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Septic tanks and water pollution



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28-11-2020 10:10
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Really should consider a roof, that can take a few solar panels, unless you plan on running a line out from the house. Lights, a fan, maybe some heat, would all be reasonable comforts, using 'green' energy though.


I am considering it. I am not sure how efficient is natural ventilation through ventilation pipes so an electrical fan could be needed. I initially though about installing whirly birds on vent pipes but I also do not know how effective are those. I guess if there is no wind they do not work.
So for the solar setup I need a couple of solar panels and that is it? Or do I need a battery also?
28-11-2020 11:47
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
Xadoman wrote:
Really should consider a roof, that can take a few solar panels, unless you plan on running a line out from the house. Lights, a fan, maybe some heat, would all be reasonable comforts, using 'green' energy though.


I am considering it. I am not sure how efficient is natural ventilation through ventilation pipes so an electrical fan could be needed. I initially though about installing whirly birds on vent pipes but I also do not know how effective are those. I guess if there is no wind they do not work.
So for the solar setup I need a couple of solar panels and that is it? Or do I need a battery also?


Solar's major malfunction, is that it only works during daytime hours... But, your power needs aren't going to be much, just occasionally at night, so not much of a battery, or charge controller, and panels.
28-11-2020 12:24
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
Xadoman wrote:
Really should consider a roof, that can take a few solar panels, unless you plan on running a line out from the house. Lights, a fan, maybe some heat, would all be reasonable comforts, using 'green' energy though.


I am considering it. I am not sure how efficient is natural ventilation through ventilation pipes so an electrical fan could be needed. I initially though about installing whirly birds on vent pipes but I also do not know how effective are those. I guess if there is no wind they do not work.
So for the solar setup I need a couple of solar panels and that is it? Or do I need a battery also?


No power at night from solar. Batteries can ballast solar power so you have power at night, but you won't have a lot of power. Maybe enough to run a light in the place for awhile. Fans require more power.

The whirly birds do work. It doesn't take much wind to run them. They don't have to run all the time either.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
28-11-2020 18:38
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
Into the Night wrote:
Xadoman wrote:
Really should consider a roof, that can take a few solar panels, unless you plan on running a line out from the house. Lights, a fan, maybe some heat, would all be reasonable comforts, using 'green' energy though.


I am considering it. I am not sure how efficient is natural ventilation through ventilation pipes so an electrical fan could be needed. I initially though about installing whirly birds on vent pipes but I also do not know how effective are those. I guess if there is no wind they do not work.
So for the solar setup I need a couple of solar panels and that is it? Or do I need a battery also?


No power at night from solar. Batteries can ballast solar power so you have power at night, but you won't have a lot of power. Maybe enough to run a light in the place for awhile. Fans require more power.

The whirly birds do work. It doesn't take much wind to run them. They don't have to run all the time either.


Wouldn't need to run the lights, the fan, or anything all the time, just when the outhouse is occupied. Could be on a motion detector and a timer. Just something to consider. Deep cycle marine batteries work pretty good, and living on a lake, should be able to 'borrow' one out of a boat...
28-11-2020 19:47
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Xadoman wrote:
Really should consider a roof, that can take a few solar panels, unless you plan on running a line out from the house. Lights, a fan, maybe some heat, would all be reasonable comforts, using 'green' energy though.


I am considering it. I am not sure how efficient is natural ventilation through ventilation pipes so an electrical fan could be needed. I initially though about installing whirly birds on vent pipes but I also do not know how effective are those. I guess if there is no wind they do not work.
So for the solar setup I need a couple of solar panels and that is it? Or do I need a battery also?


No power at night from solar. Batteries can ballast solar power so you have power at night, but you won't have a lot of power. Maybe enough to run a light in the place for awhile. Fans require more power.

The whirly birds do work. It doesn't take much wind to run them. They don't have to run all the time either.


Wouldn't need to run the lights, the fan, or anything all the time, just when the outhouse is occupied. Could be on a motion detector and a timer. Just something to consider. Deep cycle marine batteries work pretty good, and living on a lake, should be able to 'borrow' one out of a boat...

Quite true, but I don't know if they allow boats on that lake. It's basically a swamp.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
29-11-2020 04:00
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
Start watching at 2:00 minutes. With a 2 room shed, support can be added in the middle if there's a wall there. No reply necessary.

https://youtu.be/eryBwS2hJOM
29-11-2020 11:03
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
I found a quite funny video how to walk on the tiles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-pQSHk_S7I&ab_channel=MichaelSchojer
29-11-2020 15:24
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
clay; 1.702 gram per cubic centimeter
cement; 2.8 g/cm³

Why cement tiles can be walked on. And ridges increase surface area which increases strength. Basic engineering fact.

There is a significant difference in the weight of concrete and clay tiles. Concrete tiles weigh almost 40 percent more than clay tiles. While concrete can weigh anywhere from 820 to 1,100 pounds per 100 square feet, clay only weighs about 600 to 650 pounds. Therefore, homes looking to use concrete tiles need to ensure that their roof is structurally able to handle the weight.

https://www.cedur.com/clay-vs-concrete-roof-tiles



Au Revoir
Edited on 29-11-2020 15:46
29-11-2020 19:04
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Another beautiful tile roof from the same guy. Turns out (from the comments) he is not in business anymore because nobody wants to learn this job anymore.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AyrMRM5kmo&ab_channel=MichaelSchojer
10-12-2020 19:47
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
The superstructure is ready for the rafters. I used wooden boards over the frame for rigidity. Here are some pictures:





I also took some pictures of the lake. Notice the ice on the lake. We have -5 degrees Celsius here. I had some trouble to get the water pump out of the lake because of it.


31-01-2021 22:18
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Today I lifted and fastened the rafters onto the wall plate.




The roof tiles also arrived last week. I made a small roof to try how the tiles would sit on the ridge.


I will eventually install a king post to support the ridge. The ceiling joists should have enough meat to whithstand the load from the roof.
24-02-2021 20:14
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
The underlayment and battens are finally in place.


24-02-2021 20:44
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
@Xadoman, will take me a day or 2 to go over your updates. I might have a lot of questions for you about the local environment and how your project allows for that.
26-02-2021 19:10
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Half of the roof is finally done. That was the easy side. The other side is going to take longer to get ready because there will be two ventilation pipes that pass through the roof.
26-02-2021 19:44
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
I noticed that you used some math on the interior. With the vent pipes, it might be simple enough to calculate the ellipse that you need to cut for them to pass through the roof.
What you might try is having a bolt or round dowel going through a piece of plywood. But at the pitch of your roof. The drawing should give you and idea of what I'm talking about. Then you could have a template to work with.
With the drawing, the round opening is for whatever you would want to use to either scribe or draw a line. About all it really requires is drilling a hole through a block of wood and then cutting that block at the same angle as your roof.

p.s., if a tall block is used, it could be screwed onto the plywood.
Am sorry about going away from math. I feel like I've sinned or something.

Attached image:


Edited on 26-02-2021 19:47
26-02-2021 20:42
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Thanks James, I appreciate your wisdom and math skills. It looks like you have a quick and elegant solution to every problem. Have you worked as an engineer?
26-02-2021 21:02
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
Xadoman wrote:
Thanks James, I appreciate your wisdom and math skills. It looks like you have a quick and elegant solution to every problem. Have you worked as an engineer?



You're welcome. I've been exposed to a lot of engineering in my life and have some projects that I'm pursuing that does involve engineering.
With cutting tiles for your roof, just not something easily done. And if they're expensive, mistakes could cost you a lot of money. I expect you have some room to play with on dimensions. Basically when the pipe goes through the roof, you have some means of covering any gap between the roof and the pipe.
If things work out well for you, others might want to know what you did so they could follow your example. You know, YouTube. It might get you a lot of views.

p.s., and some people just might like watching you do it. A guy east of Italy got millions of views for building a log cabin. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_6b_cwuB6A
I actually have watched a lot of what he did.
Edited on 26-02-2021 21:07
26-02-2021 21:29
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Basically when the pipe goes through the roof, you have some means of covering any gap between the roof and the pipe.


I am going to use some special chimney pass throughs made of plastic and metal sheet. Those will cover the area around the pipes and the metal sheet will go all the way up under the ridge tile.
26-02-2021 22:38
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
Xadoman wrote:
Basically when the pipe goes through the roof, you have some means of covering any gap between the roof and the pipe.


I am going to use some special chimney pass throughs made of plastic and metal sheet. Those will cover the area around the pipes and the metal sheet will go all the way up under the ridge tile.


Will their be any caulking around the pipe? With boats and a lapstrake hull, cotton and then caulking will be used to keep water out. Have done it before is why I know how to do it. Will you be doing anything similar to prevent moisture from going below the top of the tiles?

p.s., with waterproofing a lapstrake hull, I think it's actually cotton batting that is used. It fills
the gap caused by overlapping planks/boards. Then the caulk is pressed into the cotton batting creating a seal.
I just wonder if that might help to keep moisture out of your roof.
Attached image:


Edited on 26-02-2021 23:04
27-02-2021 06:26
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
James___ wrote:
Xadoman wrote:
Basically when the pipe goes through the roof, you have some means of covering any gap between the roof and the pipe.


I am going to use some special chimney pass throughs made of plastic and metal sheet. Those will cover the area around the pipes and the metal sheet will go all the way up under the ridge tile.


Will their be any caulking around the pipe? With boats and a lapstrake hull, cotton and then caulking will be used to keep water out. Have done it before is why I know how to do it. Will you be doing anything similar to prevent moisture from going below the top of the tiles?

p.s., with waterproofing a lapstrake hull, I think it's actually cotton batting that is used. It fills
the gap caused by overlapping planks/boards. Then the caulk is pressed into the cotton batting creating a seal.
I just wonder if that might help to keep moisture out of your roof.

Caulking is not necessary or desirable around chimneys.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
27-02-2021 16:26
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.
27-02-2021 18:24
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.



Is there a reason they couldn't? And I think Xadoman is designing it the way he wants so what he does would be up to him, right?
If you notice, his tiles do not have a flat surface on top. I posted it as something he might consider. And if he does, then he could paint the caulking to match his tiles.
That could help to prevent water (melted snow) from getting underneath his tiles and then refreezing by the eave of his roof. That could cause water to collect underneath his tiles and then eventually leak into the interior walls.
Check the exhausts. Make sure all ducts from bathrooms, kitchens or other living areas exhaust to the outside, not the attic.
Check the flashing around the chimney. Over time, the flashing may crack and separate from the roof, causing hot air to potentially escape and allowing water to trickle in along the chimney.
https://www.allstate.com/tr/home-insurance/icicles-sign-ice-dams.aspx


Kind of why I mentioned it Harvey. Am aware of ice dams and the potential damage that they could cause. With concrete, it's damage is usually caused by water getting into cracks and crevices and then freezing. Why concrete is sealed. Even warm water will expand so same thing. It's about preventing water damage.
Edited on 27-02-2021 18:25
27-02-2021 19:38
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.

Harvey is correct.
James___ wrote:
Is there a reason they couldn't?

Not necessary.
James___ wrote:
And I think Xadoman is designing it the way he wants so what he does would be up to him, right?

True.
James___ wrote:
If you notice, his tiles do not have a flat surface on top. I posted it as something he might consider. And if he does, then he could paint the caulking to match his tiles.

Caulking is not necessary.
James___ wrote:
That could help to prevent water (melted snow) from getting underneath his tiles and then refreezing by the eave of his roof.

You can't. Ice dams happen.
James___ wrote:
That could cause water to collect underneath his tiles and then eventually leak into the interior walls.

Nope. That's the purpose of the tar paper.
James___ wrote:
[quote]Check the exhausts. Make sure all ducts from bathrooms, kitchens or other living areas exhaust to the outside, not the attic.
Check the flashing around the chimney. Over time, the flashing may crack and separate from the roof, causing hot air to potentially escape and allowing water to trickle in along the chimney.
...deleted redundant link to Allstate...

Good advice. Indeed, it's a good idea to check the condition of the roof each year.
James___ wrote:
Kind of why I mentioned it Harvey. Am aware of ice dams and the potential damage that they could cause.

With concrete, it's damage is usually caused by water getting into cracks and crevices and then freezing.

Concrete does not have ice dams.
James___ wrote:
Why concrete is sealed. Even warm water will expand so same thing.

Xadoman is not building a concrete roof.
James___ wrote:
It's about preventing water damage.

You are wandering aimlessly again.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
27-02-2021 20:25
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.



Is there a reason they couldn't? And I think Xadoman is designing it the way he wants so what he does would be up to him, right?
If you notice, his tiles do not have a flat surface on top. I posted it as something he might consider. And if he does, then he could paint the caulking to match his tiles.
That could help to prevent water (melted snow) from getting underneath his tiles and then refreezing by the eave of his roof. That could cause water to collect underneath his tiles and then eventually leak into the interior walls.
Check the exhausts. Make sure all ducts from bathrooms, kitchens or other living areas exhaust to the outside, not the attic.
Check the flashing around the chimney. Over time, the flashing may crack and separate from the roof, causing hot air to potentially escape and allowing water to trickle in along the chimney.
https://www.allstate.com/tr/home-insurance/icicles-sign-ice-dams.aspx


Kind of why I mentioned it Harvey. Am aware of ice dams and the potential damage that they could cause. With concrete, it's damage is usually caused by water getting into cracks and crevices and then freezing. Why concrete is sealed. Even warm water will expand so same thing. It's about preventing water damage.


How much of that plant-fiber caulking you mentioned, was used on the Navy cruise ship, that you rode around on? I only remember seeing it used on wood hull boats. Aluminum hulls got some thick, nasty goo. Fiberglass used two-part resin, also nasty to work with. Yeah, spent a couple summers at a boat rental place on the lake, cleaning, maintenance, light repairs and patch jobs...

He obviously isn't looking to go cheap, and using the best materials available for the project. I would have gone with a solar panel roof solution. Could have been some emergency, backup power, but mostly, it could have easily powered lights, fans, negative ion/ozone generator, to keep it fresh, bug and germ free all year long.
27-02-2021 21:58
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.



Is there a reason they couldn't? And I think Xadoman is designing it the way he wants so what he does would be up to him, right?
If you notice, his tiles do not have a flat surface on top. I posted it as something he might consider. And if he does, then he could paint the caulking to match his tiles.
That could help to prevent water (melted snow) from getting underneath his tiles and then refreezing by the eave of his roof. That could cause water to collect underneath his tiles and then eventually leak into the interior walls.
Check the exhausts. Make sure all ducts from bathrooms, kitchens or other living areas exhaust to the outside, not the attic.
Check the flashing around the chimney. Over time, the flashing may crack and separate from the roof, causing hot air to potentially escape and allowing water to trickle in along the chimney.
https://www.allstate.com/tr/home-insurance/icicles-sign-ice-dams.aspx


Kind of why I mentioned it Harvey. Am aware of ice dams and the potential damage that they could cause. With concrete, it's damage is usually caused by water getting into cracks and crevices and then freezing. Why concrete is sealed. Even warm water will expand so same thing. It's about preventing water damage.


How much of that plant-fiber caulking you mentioned, was used on the Navy cruise ship, that you rode around on? I only remember seeing it used on wood hull boats.



My dad's friend had a double ender, lapstraked boat. We helped him re-caulk his hull. The cotton batting wouldn't be to absorb water as you claimed. It would be to help prevent the caulking being damaged if the wood hull expands or contracts. Also because with a lapstrake configuration, what happens if the boards move? So you see, the cotton batting actually keeps the caulking positioned so if it moves, it won't tear.
Haven't you ever worked on a boat before? This is where your lack of experience shows. And with what Xadoman is doing, if he likes the idea, it'd be a cheap way to help protect his investment. You know, just keep all of the snow and water on top of his tiles.

p.s., the boat I helped to re-caulk was a 65 footer Harvey. The hull will flex some on any boat.
Edited on 27-02-2021 22:23
28-02-2021 02:02
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
The caulking absorbs moisture quicker than the wood, and expands, and provides a decent seal. Wood also absorbs moisture and swells. Just takes longer. The caulking shouldn't just fall out, if you did it right. I does dry, and shrink, and can get pulled out. Ideally, it's not allowed to dry out completely.

65 footer, Norwegian Navy Destroyer?
28-02-2021 03:50
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
HarveyH55 wrote:
The caulking absorbs moisture quicker than the wood, and expands, and provides a decent seal. Wood also absorbs moisture and swells. Just takes longer. The caulking shouldn't just fall out, if you did it right. I does dry, and shrink, and can get pulled out. Ideally, it's not allowed to dry out completely.

65 footer, Norwegian Navy Destroyer?



Considering the guy worked with my dad at Boeing...
I did take an aircraft carrier through dry dock. We were the first ship's crew to have to help with the overhaul. And out of dry dock, lots of maintenance.
I also did many FOD walks on the flight deck. If you follow the bottom of the "flying bridge" straight back, the walk way is called "Vultures Row" Watched a lot of flight ops which consist of TOLs.
Unless we were on West-Pac (deployed), a minimum number of TOLs were required before returning to port. You must be bored because you've had an easy life. I get that a lot from people.

I got one for you Harvey. At the 1:55, 1:56 time stamp, three sailors in a row on the right side getting up on stage. I'm the 3rd guy. I found a gal to dance with.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq0nswHlzKQ
And just think, somewhere they have archived footage from the camera on the stage. If things work out for me, I might ask for it. Yep, I can even say that I've been on national TV even though you can't see my face. It's just that we weren't supposed to go up on stage. A guy on the left side started up and then a lot of us followed suit. And that was when I was on the USS Ranger, the first aircraft carrier that I served aboard. And with my science experiment, it's genesis is from when I served in the US Navy. It's a kick to remember that Harvey. I sought out one of the dancers while other guys just started dancing. And if you follow the camera that rolls across the middle of the stage, I'm the 2nd sailor dancing with a dancer for the show.
Still, need a life today.

Attached image:


Edited on 28-02-2021 04:19
28-02-2021 05:07
duncan61
★★★★☆
(1378)
Nice show James.Back to the flashing for the vents.Its clay tiles you use lead sheet thats it
28-02-2021 05:20
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
Harvey, Ever serve in a Navy? No? Could you imagine a sailor dancing on stage when you're told "Do Not Go The Stage"? What was on TV was filmed from the opposite side of the stage. Where me and the other guys got up on it, we were in back.
With the science experiment, you've never been in an auxiliary space or a main engine room, have you? Or San Diego. When a ship mate pointed out how there was smog in the morning and it would burn off by noon, when coupled with using steam to flash sea water to desalinate it or to use vacuum and a main condenser to create a vacuum to pull steam through as condensate, those are interesting processes.
And if I get scientists outside of the US to work with me in seeing if CO2 + H2O > CH2O and O2,
it will be an important scientific observation. And I'll be able to say that my understanding of it started when I was in the US Navy.
And then I can ask for the film shot by the camera on the stage. I think it would be cool to be able to watch me and that dancer dancing. And I think the US Navy would like it because of the publicity that it would generate.

@Xadoman, I'm working on a German historical project. It's wood working and is math intensive. With the science experiment, some of the math would need to be done by an atmospheric chemistry scientist and some by an astrophysicist. Kind of why I post in this forum. A posting 4 years ago when I tried getting people n a physics forum interested in it.
https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/is-co2-h2o-ch2o-o2-possible.876215/
A Dr. Pöschl who is a professor of atmospheric chemistry and physics at the Max Planck Institute of Physics asked me why he should be interested. That meant that I needed a much better hypothesis. I think I have it now. Still, I can form and pour a foundation, walls, etc. but that's not me. I have a significant hearing loss in one ear so have to do more.
When I worked for Boeing in a machine shop, I took many courses. And some of them we were made aware of lines of stress. Stress in any structure has a flow. From watching educational TV,
some train trestles are pre-stressed. This means that at the top of the arch, an extra brick is placed. This prevents the trestle from vibrating when a train crosses it.
With a bridge like this, if one extra brick is placed top center, it will be rigid. Without it, then what passes over the top will send shock waves down through the bricks.
https://images.app.goo.gl/YLuSPzxT5MVR3WvE8
It's just that the stress from above can't be directed straight down. It's deflected. And this is when it can cancel itself out. 2 opposing waves of energy can negate each other.
28-02-2021 05:26
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
duncan61 wrote:
Nice show James.Back to the flashing for the vents.Its clay tiles you use lead sheet thats it


That would be under the tiles, right? Where Xadoman lives, he might want to keep water or snow from going below the surface of the tiles. Why I'm considering this is because placing anything on top of the tiles would hurt their appearance.
And with what he's doing, ice dams under the tiles could be an issue he might want to avoid. That might be the main issue.
This link shows/explains how ice dams form under tiles/shingles.
https://home-partners.com/articles/ice-dams-quick-fixes-cure
Attached image:


Edited on 28-02-2021 05:44
28-02-2021 06:04
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
@Harvey, when you don't know what a dinghy is, I've been around boats and ships since I was 4 years old. I crossed the Atlantic Ocean on a freighter when I was 4. I started young. Do something yourself, okay?
And with Australia, have been to Perth, Australia, Hamburg, Germany and other countries. And you've been in Oregon and Florida. Get a clue, I haven't sat at home like you. This счїт gets old.

p.s., Perth can't port an aircraft carrier. This means using lft's to go ashore in Freemantle.
p.s.s., lots of different landing craft. Fault me for that, okay?

And as I mentioned, your attacks have gone stale. Please show where you've done something. You know, like dancing on stage in front of a camera with a pretty girl.
The camera sure as hell didn't stop me. If that footage is made known, you'll notice I didn't look at the camera. That's because I liked who I was dancing with even more. But you stayed at home where you were safe.


p.s., when I was 6 and 7 years old, I lived in a mansion. A classmate didn't believe me when I showed him where I lived. Even by today's standards, it was a mansion. We also lived on 5 acres in the city. But what I liked best was a friend's sandbox. He had it better than me.
The area below the child care center is the property that I lived on.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/K6aswr26C1Hhf5zM7
Can't fit in when you live in the biggest house in town. And that's for the most part literal. 2 give you a clue Harvey, my yard stretched a city block. Kids were more popular when their entire yard could fit inside of our driveway.
It was circular and had a creek running through it. And yet I plucked chickens for dinner when living with my grandmother. Get a fükken clüe.

p.s., the guys in here will say, all of the property from the road to the golf course?
That's where I lived when we moved back to the US from Norway. I even had a speech teacher tell me that Per is pronounced
per /pər/
That's wrong. It does not resemble purr. And yet it's not Pierre. You crazy Americans.

Attached image:


Edited on 28-02-2021 06:48
28-02-2021 07:04
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
Get a clue Harvey. When I lived with my American grandmother, the kitchen sink had only cold water. Just no other running water. Baths were with a wash cloth in the winter and in a rain barrel when it was warm.
Chicken dinners consisted of her pulling off their heads (me and my brothers had fun chasing them, the old saying is true about a chicken with its head cutoff) and my plucking them. Black gals have told me they weren't that poor, their mothers bought store bought chicken. Plucking a chicken is a beotch. If it hasn't been boiled long enough, it's really difficult to pluck one.
It was so bad that for a snack in the summer, we had to eat grapes off of the vine. Or worse yet, green beans and corn for dinner? You guessed it, we had to go out and take some off of the stalk or vine. That was rough. Picking and shucking both corn and green beans for dinner.
It's in a can for a reason. And most people haven't experienced the good and the difficult in America. With my grandmother, we had the neighbors dairy farm we could roam. It had more acreage. It wasn't just 5 acres.
I mean living in a mansion is nice and all but where my grandmother lived was better. The question is, which grandmother. And that I won't say. My grandmother in Norway had a better life than me and she only visited the US once.
Edited on 28-02-2021 07:06
28-02-2021 07:05
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
When you make things about ethnicity Harvey, America can't win. And yet Americans don't know that.
And to be serious, you've never seen a chicken with its head cutoff. They do run around and are fun to chase. My American grandmother never saw the fun in this.

p.s., and you guys probably have never chased a headless chicken before?
And you've never lived in a mansion before? And you've never served your country.
Notice the common theme? You haven't done. Maybe I am the lucky one.
If I were like everyone else then I would not be asking questions. And for fun's sake, why did Pocahontas become involved with the Brits for? History is so weird.

p.s.s., Thank You Harvey for making the LCD made known.


LCD is lowest common denominator and your personal attacks have grown old. You're a bigot. You should understand this.
Attached image:


Edited on 28-02-2021 07:26
28-02-2021 07:37
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
And Harvey, when it can be shown that I was in front of the camera, my attention was on the woman that I was dancing with. I basically ignored the camera. And with you in Florida, you might have to watch actual footage of my preferring to dance with a woman rather than being noticed by a camera.
And this is on national TV.

Edited on 28-02-2021 07:39
28-02-2021 07:54
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
And when you want to say caulking, in the Navy, there is labyrinth packing of steam seals. It's how a steam chest functions. If you can understand heat flow and condensation, then it's a simple matter.
A steam chest reduces pressure from 1,200 psi down to less than 400 psi. Just a basic premise of a steam chest. With steam, a packing gland is used. Moisture helps to create a seal. Kind of what you said about barriers and they leak. Easy enough to discuss if you know the parameters. And Harvey, we can discuss that, right?

I am so stupid, it's a nozzle block. I feel so stupid. A steam chest really doesn't matter. A balloon fills with hot air, right?

And Harvey, you know this, right? It is strange how you attack me for having served your country. Kind of why I think America sucks. You're patriotic, right?

You do see how this works Harvey. You don't know what a steam chest is. And for any TV show on an aircraft carrier, it's Norwegian garbage. No one will disagree with you. A TV show on an aircraft carrier is Norwegian bullshit.
You can't lose because you're an American. And these guys love you for your obvious bigotry.
Edited on 28-02-2021 08:13
28-02-2021 08:14
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
You win Harvey. You're a"pure" American.
28-02-2021 08:36
James___
★★★★★
(5118)
I would ask you to move past your bigotry, but you could never keep up with me.
You need to get a clue. My serving in the US Navy got me on national TV. And with you,
it was a show. Flip Wilson was hilarious when the cameras weren't on him.
Basically it wasn't what could be shown on TV. He showed what the cameras meant.
There was what the public saw and then there was what the public didn't see. It was an eye opener for me.
And seriously Harvey, it matters. It's not really possible to say how a comic icon can be 2 different people. You just have to hear the difference.

With Flip Wilson, there were breaks in the filming of the special and he entertained us. I just can't say how. The show did not show how funny he was. Things changed.
If you were there, you would have noticed filming and not filming. It was that obvious.

p.s., and Harvey, I like seeing me running onto the stage to dance with a girl. I went around other sailors who danced with guys. And with you, even with other guys, the video shows what it does. And if it wasn't for your "Norwegian" comment, I wouldn't have found out that this happened while I was serving on the USS Ranger and not the USS Kitty Hawk.
Edited on 28-02-2021 08:50
28-02-2021 08:50
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Boat caulking works, because it swells when it gets wet. Pretty sure that's not how they do roofs.



Is there a reason they couldn't? And I think Xadoman is designing it the way he wants so what he does would be up to him, right?
If you notice, his tiles do not have a flat surface on top. I posted it as something he might consider. And if he does, then he could paint the caulking to match his tiles.
That could help to prevent water (melted snow) from getting underneath his tiles and then refreezing by the eave of his roof. That could cause water to collect underneath his tiles and then eventually leak into the interior walls.
Check the exhausts. Make sure all ducts from bathrooms, kitchens or other living areas exhaust to the outside, not the attic.
Check the flashing around the chimney. Over time, the flashing may crack and separate from the roof, causing hot air to potentially escape and allowing water to trickle in along the chimney.
https://www.allstate.com/tr/home-insurance/icicles-sign-ice-dams.aspx


Kind of why I mentioned it Harvey. Am aware of ice dams and the potential damage that they could cause. With concrete, it's damage is usually caused by water getting into cracks and crevices and then freezing. Why concrete is sealed. Even warm water will expand so same thing. It's about preventing water damage.


How much of that plant-fiber caulking you mentioned, was used on the Navy cruise ship, that you rode around on? I only remember seeing it used on wood hull boats.



My dad's friend had a double ender, lapstraked boat. We helped him re-caulk his hull. The cotton batting wouldn't be to absorb water as you claimed. It would be to help prevent the caulking being damaged if the wood hull expands or contracts. Also because with a lapstrake configuration, what happens if the boards move? So you see, the cotton batting actually keeps the caulking positioned so if it moves, it won't tear.
Haven't you ever worked on a boat before? This is where your lack of experience shows. And with what Xadoman is doing, if he likes the idea, it'd be a cheap way to help protect his investment. You know, just keep all of the snow and water on top of his tiles.

p.s., the boat I helped to re-caulk was a 65 footer Harvey. The hull will flex some on any boat.

Caulking is not necessary.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
28-02-2021 08:53
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
The caulking absorbs moisture quicker than the wood, and expands, and provides a decent seal. Wood also absorbs moisture and swells. Just takes longer. The caulking shouldn't just fall out, if you did it right. I does dry, and shrink, and can get pulled out. Ideally, it's not allowed to dry out completely.

65 footer, Norwegian Navy Destroyer?



Considering the guy worked with my dad at Boeing...
I did take an aircraft carrier through dry dock. We were the first ship's crew to have to help with the overhaul. And out of dry dock, lots of maintenance.
I also did many FOD walks on the flight deck. If you follow the bottom of the "flying bridge" straight back, the walk way is called "Vultures Row" Watched a lot of flight ops which consist of TOLs.
Unless we were on West-Pac (deployed), a minimum number of TOLs were required before returning to port. You must be bored because you've had an easy life. I get that a lot from people.

I got one for you Harvey. At the 1:55, 1:56 time stamp, three sailors in a row on the right side getting up on stage. I'm the 3rd guy. I found a gal to dance with.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq0nswHlzKQ
And just think, somewhere they have archived footage from the camera on the stage. If things work out for me, I might ask for it. Yep, I can even say that I've been on national TV even though you can't see my face. It's just that we weren't supposed to go up on stage. A guy on the left side started up and then a lot of us followed suit. And that was when I was on the USS Ranger, the first aircraft carrier that I served aboard. And with my science experiment, it's genesis is from when I served in the US Navy. It's a kick to remember that Harvey. I sought out one of the dancers while other guys just started dancing. And if you follow the camera that rolls across the middle of the stage, I'm the 2nd sailor dancing with a dancer for the show.
Still, need a life today.

I don't believe you.
You were never in the navy, never worked on any boat or ship, and you are making it all up again.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
28-02-2021 08:54
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
James___ wrote:
Get a clue Harvey. When I lived with my American grandmother, the kitchen sink had only cold water. Just no other running water. Baths were with a wash cloth in the winter and in a rain barrel when it was warm.
Chicken dinners consisted of her pulling off their heads (me and my brothers had fun chasing them, the old saying is true about a chicken with its head cutoff) and my plucking them. Black gals have told me they weren't that poor, their mothers bought store bought chicken. Plucking a chicken is a beotch. If it hasn't been boiled long enough, it's really difficult to pluck one.
It was so bad that for a snack in the summer, we had to eat grapes off of the vine. Or worse yet, green beans and corn for dinner? You guessed it, we had to go out and take some off of the stalk or vine. That was rough. Picking and shucking both corn and green beans for dinner.
It's in a can for a reason. And most people haven't experienced the good and the difficult in America. With my grandmother, we had the neighbors dairy farm we could roam. It had more acreage. It wasn't just 5 acres.
I mean living in a mansion is nice and all but where my grandmother lived was better. The question is, which grandmother. And that I won't say. My grandmother in Norway had a better life than me and she only visited the US once.

More fiction.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
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