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Maximizing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Agroecosystems



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RE: Global Warming Potential (GWP) of different gases25-08-2022 21:34
Im a BM
★★☆☆☆
(197)
James_ wrote:
According to the EPA, N2O (nitrous oxide) has a 300 times greater impact on global warming than CO2 does. CO2 is 79% of GHG emissions while N2O is only 7%.
A little math tell us .79 x 1 = .79 Then
.............................07 x 300 = 21
We have a winner folks. 21 is always a winer in Vegas but what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.
If not, why go to Vegas to gamble and party? Right folks? So 21 is always a winner in Vegas.
And now we're back to ODSs and ozone depletion. And CO2 is helping the ozone layer to recover.
Kind of makes me feel like I'm in the Twilight Zone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If3SXJeZzMQ



I was surprised to see EPA saying nitrous oxide has 300 times as much global warming potential as CO2.

The people I knew who were researching it were estimating about 200, but that was more than 10 years ago.

The easy part is to use spectroscopy in a lab and compare carbon dioxide to nitrous oxide.

That will tell you, gram per gram or mole per mole, how much more capable nitrous oxide is compared to carbon dioxide to absorb and emit infrared.

You can get an exact answer out to the tenth decimal place.

But the hard part is to know how long the gases remain in the atmosphere.

To calculate global warming potential (GWP), you have to have a mean residence time for the gas in the air.

An incredibly powerful greenhouse gas will have little impact if it is removed from the atmosphere as soon as it is emitted.

For the number to have shifted from 200 to 300 means that someone has decided that either carbon dioxide has a shorter mean residence time than previously believed, or that nitrous oxide hangs around longer than they used to think.

I'm surprised if it is the second, because they were learning about new ways nitrous oxide gets removed.

At the surface, microorganisms can pull it back out of the air and reduce it to ammonia, or oxidize it to nitrate.

High above, it gets consumed through oxidation by ozone, with nitric acid as a major product.

A specific mechanism has been identified whereby this either brings about MORE ozone loss, OR prevents additional ozone loss, depending on how long the nitric acid ice crystals remain suspended.

If the nitric acid crystal just acts as a magnet upon which ozone destroying agents adsorbed, but then pulls them down toward the surface before they have time to react with much ozone, it causes short term ozone loss but then allows for robust recovery as fewer ozone destroying agents are available.

If that nitric acid ice hangs out for a long time before falling, it could be facilitating more ozone destruction than would occur in their absence.

While the simple calculation presented above suggests that nitrous oxide was doing 7% of the about of the anthropogenic global warming (not ozone destruction related), the number in the textbooks used to be more like 16%.

But I've never heard of a mechanism through which carbon dioxide could be protecting the ozone layer. Well, maybe one.

If carbon dioxide is the main gas responsible for global warming and associated stratospheric COOLING, which now permits temperatures cold enough to freeze nitric acid, maybe that how CO2 protects the ozone?

You will get a Nobel prize if you can show a plausible mechanism for CO2 protecting the ozone layer via some direct chemical interaction.

What mechanism do you propose?
26-08-2022 17:20
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Im a BM wrote:
James_ wrote:
According to the EPA, N2O (nitrous oxide) has a 300 times greater impact on global warming than CO2 does. CO2 is 79% of GHG emissions while N2O is only 7%.
A little math tell us .79 x 1 = .79 Then
.............................07 x 300 = 21
We have a winner folks. 21 is always a winer in Vegas but what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.
If not, why go to Vegas to gamble and party? Right folks? So 21 is always a winner in Vegas.
And now we're back to ODSs and ozone depletion. And CO2 is helping the ozone layer to recover.
Kind of makes me feel like I'm in the Twilight Zone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If3SXJeZzMQ



I was surprised to see EPA saying nitrous oxide has 300 times as much global warming potential as CO2.

The people I knew who were researching it were estimating about 200, but that was more than 10 years ago.

The easy part is to use spectroscopy in a lab and compare carbon dioxide to nitrous oxide.

That will tell you, gram per gram or mole per mole, how much more capable nitrous oxide is compared to carbon dioxide to absorb and emit infrared.

You can get an exact answer out to the tenth decimal place.

But the hard part is to know how long the gases remain in the atmosphere.

To calculate global warming potential (GWP), you have to have a mean residence time for the gas in the air.

An incredibly powerful greenhouse gas will have little impact if it is removed from the atmosphere as soon as it is emitted.

For the number to have shifted from 200 to 300 means that someone has decided that either carbon dioxide has a shorter mean residence time than previously believed, or that nitrous oxide hangs around longer than they used to think.

I'm surprised if it is the second, because they were learning about new ways nitrous oxide gets removed.

At the surface, microorganisms can pull it back out of the air and reduce it to ammonia, or oxidize it to nitrate.

High above, it gets consumed through oxidation by ozone, with nitric acid as a major product.

A specific mechanism has been identified whereby this either brings about MORE ozone loss, OR prevents additional ozone loss, depending on how long the nitric acid ice crystals remain suspended.

If the nitric acid crystal just acts as a magnet upon which ozone destroying agents adsorbed, but then pulls them down toward the surface before they have time to react with much ozone, it causes short term ozone loss but then allows for robust recovery as fewer ozone destroying agents are available.

If that nitric acid ice hangs out for a long time before falling, it could be facilitating more ozone destruction than would occur in their absence.

While the simple calculation presented above suggests that nitrous oxide was doing 7% of the about of the anthropogenic global warming (not ozone destruction related), the number in the textbooks used to be more like 16%.

But I've never heard of a mechanism through which carbon dioxide could be protecting the ozone layer. Well, maybe one.

If carbon dioxide is the main gas responsible for global warming and associated stratospheric COOLING, which now permits temperatures cold enough to freeze nitric acid, maybe that how CO2 protects the ozone?

You will get a Nobel prize if you can show a plausible mechanism for CO2 protecting the ozone layer via some direct chemical interaction.

What mechanism do you propose?

No gas or vapor is capable of warming or cooling the Earth. You are still ignoring the 1st law or thermodynamics.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
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