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US Water Shortaages


US Water Shortaages17-04-2021 21:55
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
This is a new one. The agency that oversees water in the US might have to declare there isn't enough water in the Colorado River to support current levels of usage.

The agency's models project Lake Mead will fall below 1,075 feet (328 meters) for the first time in June 2021. That's the level that prompts a shortage declaration under agreements negotiated by seven states that rely on Colorado River water: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.
https://apnews.com/article/arizona-colorado-lakes-water-shortages-colorado-river-09302e61c5e0ef051f50459f3dcb771f
18-04-2021 01:50
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
Oh NO! Global Warming, Global Warning... The climate is changing, from winter to spring MELTING. All that snow accumulation in the mountains, will start melting, over the next month or two. Along with the usual spring showers. The reservoirs will fill rapidly enough, like they do every year. They would be a 'water' shortage, if California quit wasting so much, fighting wildfires, they could have stopped/minimized. And, of course, the rich folks watering their precious yards, even though the lived out of state, most of the pandemic.
18-04-2021 02:08
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Oh NO! Global Warming, Global Warning... The climate is changing, from winter to spring MELTING. All that snow accumulation in the mountains, will start melting, over the next month or two. Along with the usual spring showers. The reservoirs will fill rapidly enough, like they do every year. They would be a 'water' shortage, if California quit wasting so much, fighting wildfires, they could have stopped/minimized. And, of course, the rich folks watering their precious yards, even though the lived out of state, most of the pandemic.



The issue is, this isn't happening.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=953PkxFNiko
18-04-2021 08:24
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Oh NO! Global Warming, Global Warning... The climate is changing, from winter to spring MELTING. All that snow accumulation in the mountains, will start melting, over the next month or two. Along with the usual spring showers. The reservoirs will fill rapidly enough, like they do every year. They would be a 'water' shortage, if California quit wasting so much, fighting wildfires, they could have stopped/minimized. And, of course, the rich folks watering their precious yards, even though the lived out of state, most of the pandemic.

It's not even waste. The simply don't collect it.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
18-04-2021 17:21
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Oh NO! Global Warming, Global Warning... The climate is changing, from winter to spring MELTING. All that snow accumulation in the mountains, will start melting, over the next month or two. Along with the usual spring showers. The reservoirs will fill rapidly enough, like they do every year. They would be a 'water' shortage, if California quit wasting so much, fighting wildfires, they could have stopped/minimized. And, of course, the rich folks watering their precious yards, even though the lived out of state, most of the pandemic.

It's not even waste. The simply don't collect it.


True, they could collect a lot more, and save it, as they tend to run short often. California dumps millions of gallons of it on the ground, every year, to water lawns of the rich, and dowse wildfires. Both are wasteful, since both could easily be reduced. They'd rather complain about drought, rather than see grass die, or replace it with a more drought-friendly ground cover. The wildfires can be easily mitigated, as several other states share the same conditions, but don't let them get out of control, as often. Access roads, fire breaks, prescribed burns to remove underbrush, cost money to maintain, and aren't visual appealing. So California prefers to burn, and waste water resources, and complain about it every year, begging for federal emergency relief money, that they miss-spend on non-emergency projects.
18-04-2021 19:37
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Oh NO! Global Warming, Global Warning... The climate is changing, from winter to spring MELTING. All that snow accumulation in the mountains, will start melting, over the next month or two. Along with the usual spring showers. The reservoirs will fill rapidly enough, like they do every year. They would be a 'water' shortage, if California quit wasting so much, fighting wildfires, they could have stopped/minimized. And, of course, the rich folks watering their precious yards, even though the lived out of state, most of the pandemic.

It's not even waste. The simply don't collect it.


True, they could collect a lot more, and save it, as they tend to run short often.

Bingo.
HarveyH55 wrote:
California dumps millions of gallons of it on the ground, every year, to water lawns of the rich,

There is enough water for this, if they bothered to collect it in the first place.
HarveyH55 wrote:
and dowse wildfires.

Not a lot of water is used here. Wildfires are typically fought by building firebreaks and letting it burn itself out. Water is used to quell anything that escapes.
HarveyH55 wrote:
Both are wasteful, since both could easily be reduced.

Wildfire is certainly wasteful if it burns into communities. It is not wasteful otherwise. It actually helps to fertilize the soil.
HarveyH55 wrote:
They'd rather complain about drought,

That's self imposed, so their complaint tends to hit deaf ears.
HarveyH55 wrote:
rather than see grass die,

A lot of grass does die. That's the fuel in the wildfires. A nice wet spring causes more wild grasses to grow, which blond out in the summer. Doesn't take much of a spark to set it off. A hot exhaust, a spark from a tractor or chainsaw, a careless campfire, careless use of fireworks, lightning, arson, a downed power line, anything. Most wildfire in the SOTC is caused by arson.
HarveyH55 wrote:
or replace it with a more drought-friendly ground cover.

The wild grasses of the SOTC are a natural and normal. It IS the ground cover. The 'drought' in the SOTC is self induced.
HarveyH55 wrote:
The wildfires can be easily mitigated,

Yes. Keep brush cut back away from your house. Find and lock up the arsonists.
HarveyH55 wrote:
as several other states share the same conditions,

That they do...and you are right. They don't have the same problem as the SOTC does.
HarveyH55 wrote:
Access roads, fire breaks, prescribed burns to remove underbrush, cost money to maintain, and aren't visual appealing.

It's about the money. The SOTC is broke.
HarveyH55 wrote:
So California prefers to burn,

Apparently.
HarveyH55 wrote:
and waste water resources,

Can't waste what you don't collect.
HarveyH55 wrote:
and complain about it every year, begging for federal emergency relief money, that they miss-spend on non-emergency projects.

Bingo.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
19-04-2021 17:07
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★★
(2332)
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.
19-04-2021 18:10
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
gfm7175 wrote:
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.



The topic of this thread is water shortages in the west. It is well known that fresh water "supplies" around the globe are becoming scarce.
Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region.

It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/water_scarcity.htm
19-04-2021 18:54
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★★
(2332)
James___ wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.



The topic of this thread is water shortages in the west. It is well known that fresh water "supplies" around the globe are becoming scarce.
Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region.

It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/water_scarcity.htm

... and that topic was adequately addressed, so I didn't feel the need to repeat what has already been said. But if you wish for that, I'll do so.

The SOTC has issues with water (that are self-imposed) because they choose not to collect enough of it. Heck, my grandma (who was a young child at the tail end of FDR's Great Depression) regularly collects and makes use of rainwater. She also regularly re-purposes anything that she can, such as food containers.

I think that the SOTC needs to quit whining and get off of their asses and put in the required effort.
19-04-2021 19:02
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
I really don't get the scarce fresh water thing. We just got a lot of fresh water this morning, fill right out of the sky. Good chance of getting a second helping this afternoon.
19-04-2021 19:12
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I really don't get the scarce fresh water thing. We just got a lot of fresh water this morning, fill right out of the sky. Good chance of getting a second helping this afternoon.



The American southwest is not in Florida. Maybe you could learn some geography? I know, you live in Panem, right? May the odds be ever in your favor.
19-04-2021 19:32
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
I lived out west for a while, rained a lot, day and night, sucked. California gets rain too. After the wildfire season, they have the wet season, and mudslides, because the killed of a lot of the vegetation, that kept the soil anchored.
19-04-2021 21:37
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I lived out west for a while, rained a lot, day and night, sucked. California gets rain too. After the wildfire season, they have the wet season, and mudslides, because the killed of a lot of the vegetation, that kept the soil anchored.




You should learn to understand Engleske Harvey. You're saying that the seasons have become more extreme. The dry season drier and the wet season even more so. That describes an environment that is changing.
And like GFM, you have gone off topic. How much has water usage increased in the American Southwest?
This is funny in a way because there is more industry and agriculture in the southwest. And if you look at the graph of annual precipitation, the West Coast and the South West receive the least annual precipitation. And as for Florida? Miami receives about 74 inches of precipitation a year to Little Rock, Arkansas' 37 inches per year. Guess which one is in the Sunshine State. And to give you a hint, it's not Arkansas.

I found out about the fun factoid when I was working on a field job (installing a steam turbine) in Arkansas at a mill. I was living in Jacksonville, Fl. at the time. And in Jacksonville, you could see the double thunder heads rolling in, one on top of the other. That's how long someone could stay at the beach.
Why do households in arid Utah use so much more water than in, say, Maine? The main factor, the authors note, is outdoor watering for lawns and gardens. "Whereas residents in wetter states in the East can often rely on rainwater for their landscaping, the inhabitants of Western states must rely on sprinklers."
https://www.vox.com/2014/10/17/6994811/map-household-water-use-american-west-drought

Attached image:


Edited on 19-04-2021 21:43
19-04-2021 22:51
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I really don't get the scarce fresh water thing. We just got a lot of fresh water this morning, fill right out of the sky. Good chance of getting a second helping this afternoon.



The American southwest is not in Florida. Maybe you could learn some geography? I know, you live in Panem, right? May the odds be ever in your favor.


Washington IS in the West. We've had a LOT of fresh water lately. Just fell right out of the sky. Good chance at getting plenty more next week. Our snow pack is in excellent condition too.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
19-04-2021 23:46
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I really don't get the scarce fresh water thing. We just got a lot of fresh water this morning, fill right out of the sky. Good chance of getting a second helping this afternoon.



The American southwest is not in Florida. Maybe you could learn some geography? I know, you live in Panem, right? May the odds be ever in your favor.


Washington IS in the West. We've had a LOT of fresh water lately. Just fell right out of the sky. Good chance at getting plenty more next week. Our snow pack is in excellent condition too.




My parents had a friend that me and him would debate a cloud. If a cumulus cloud could be seen from Lake City, I'd be calling it a serious (cirrus) looking cloud.
You guys remind me of that.
20-04-2021 03:14
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
James___ wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.



The topic of this thread is water shortages in the west. It is well known that fresh water "supplies" around the globe are becoming scarce.
Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region.

It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/water_scarcity.htm


I understand English, better than you spell it... You obviously opened the the thread, to include the entire planet, which is what I responded to.

Landscaping only requires watering, if you plant non-native, and less drought-friendly grass and shrubs. Lot of people want to keep the same landscaping they had, in wetter climates, before moving south.
20-04-2021 04:11
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.



The topic of this thread is water shortages in the west. It is well known that fresh water "supplies" around the globe are becoming scarce.
Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region.

It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/water_scarcity.htm


I understand English, better than you spell it... You obviously opened the the thread, to include the entire planet, which is what I responded to.

Landscaping only requires watering, if you plant non-native, and less drought-friendly grass and shrubs. Lot of people want to keep the same landscaping they had, in wetter climates, before moving south.



South is a relative term. Do you know that there is more mass at the bottom of a sphere? It shows the directional flow of energy within a field. Continents like Australia and Africa are actually "up there" while we're "Down Under".
So what you're actually saying is that when people move to a northern state like Florida......

Edited on 20-04-2021 04:26
20-04-2021 20:49
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Apparently we've had plenty of wildfires here in Wisconsin this Spring (or so I hear). Down where I am, we've mainly just been doing prescribed burns on days that aren't too windy. A prescribed burn was done at one of the marshes where I hike (along the Ice Age Trail). The underbrush in the forested areas was also burned. It all looked quite beautiful.



The topic of this thread is water shortages in the west. It is well known that fresh water "supplies" around the globe are becoming scarce.
Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region.

It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/terms/water_scarcity.htm


I understand English, better than you spell it... You obviously opened the the thread, to include the entire planet, which is what I responded to.

Landscaping only requires watering, if you plant non-native, and less drought-friendly grass and shrubs. Lot of people want to keep the same landscaping they had, in wetter climates, before moving south.



South is a relative term. Do you know that there is more mass at the bottom of a sphere? It shows the directional flow of energy within a field. Continents like Australia and Africa are actually "up there" while we're "Down Under".
So what you're actually saying is that when people move to a northern state like Florida......

Either half of a sphere of the same material has the same mass. Earth is no different.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
21-04-2021 17:11
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
It is estimated that 68% of the Earth's land exists in the Northern Hemisphere, while 32% is located in the Southern Hemisphere. All of North America and continental Europe is situated in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as parts of Asia, Africa, and South America.
Attached image:

22-04-2021 02:52
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
James___ wrote:
It is estimated that 68% of the Earth's land exists in the Northern Hemisphere, while 32% is located in the Southern Hemisphere. All of North America and continental Europe is situated in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as parts of Asia, Africa, and South America.

So?


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
22-04-2021 04:49
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
It is estimated that 68% of the Earth's land exists in the Northern Hemisphere, while 32% is located in the Southern Hemisphere. All of North America and continental Europe is situated in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as parts of Asia, Africa, and South America.

So?



You must be Chinese. The world revolves around China just as you suggest it does.
22-04-2021 06:28
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15839)
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
It is estimated that 68% of the Earth's land exists in the Northern Hemisphere, while 32% is located in the Southern Hemisphere. All of North America and continental Europe is situated in the Northern Hemisphere, as well as parts of Asia, Africa, and South America.

So?



You must be Chinese. The world revolves around China just as you suggest it does.

I never suggested it does. You are hallucinating again.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
27-04-2021 23:31
S@ve0ur3arth
☆☆☆☆☆
(19)
James___ wrote:
This is a new one. The agency that oversees water in the US might have to declare there isn't enough water in the Colorado River to support current levels of usage.

The agency's models project Lake Mead will fall below 1,075 feet (328 meters) for the first time in June 2021. That's the level that prompts a shortage declaration under agreements negotiated by seven states that rely on Colorado River water: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.
https://apnews.com/article/arizona-colorado-lakes-water-shortages-colorado-river-09302e61c5e0ef051f50459f3dcb771f

If this is true, we're talking about a massive crisis in the coming months. I hope this never happens.
28-04-2021 05:14
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
S@ve0ur3arth wrote:
James___ wrote:
This is a new one. The agency that oversees water in the US might have to declare there isn't enough water in the Colorado River to support current levels of usage.

The agency's models project Lake Mead will fall below 1,075 feet (328 meters) for the first time in June 2021. That's the level that prompts a shortage declaration under agreements negotiated by seven states that rely on Colorado River water: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.
https://apnews.com/article/arizona-colorado-lakes-water-shortages-colorado-river-09302e61c5e0ef051f50459f3dcb771f

If this is true, we're talking about a massive crisis in the coming months. I hope this never happens.



It seems that it is slowly happening. I've been following very closely for several years the depletion of aquifers and water tables in the US. Simply put, over the next 30 years, 40% of US agricultural production is at risk.
The Ogallala Aquifer which goes from Texas to South Dakota is drying up. And if there's insufficient snow pack in western states, then the primary source of water has been reduced as well.
If things continue as they are now, in 2030 the western US might be in a severe water crisis. And then food prices will be much higher. I get into it with these guys that we can observe trends.
Surprisingly I cannot find a chart that shows a year to year snowfall in a given mountain range. There is this and they explain that snowfall and at what temperature changes the water content of the snowfall; https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090512153335.htm
and as for aquifers, there is this; http://duwaterlawreview.com/crisis-on-the-high-plains-the-loss-of-americas-largest-aquifer-the-ogallala/
28-04-2021 20:20
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3525)
Al Gore lies. Florida was suppose to be mostly under water, 8 years ago. Fresh water falls from the sky. You don't have to dig for it. Wells are for convenience. Maybe we can convince our lord, Biden, to finish the Keystone XL project, and use it for water. Then we can go back to oil, after the Biden puppet show is over. If people spend $1.50, for a bottle of filtered tap water... Think of what they could gouge desperate farmers for...
28-04-2021 21:10
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Al Gore lies. Florida was suppose to be mostly under water, 8 years ago. Fresh water falls from the sky. You don't have to dig for it. Wells are for convenience. Maybe we can convince our lord, Biden, to finish the Keystone XL project, and use it for water. Then we can go back to oil, after the Biden puppet show is over. If people spend $1.50, for a bottle of filtered tap water... Think of what they could gouge desperate farmers for...



And Al Gore lost the election for POTUS by distancing himself from Bill Clinton. Then because George W. Bush won, we went to war with Iraq because he lied to the American public. Can you really trust a politician? It's known that Trump doesn't like those who support him. He thinks they're idiots.

"The people Trump despises most love him the most," Howard Stern has said.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/10/sunday-review/trump-supporters.html
28-04-2021 23:02
James___
★★★★★
(4756)
To stay on topic, this link https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-decline-and-depletion?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects just scroll down to the first graph. It's for Umatilla County, Oregon.
The ground water has gone from 160 feet below the surface to below 260 feet between 1960 and 2010. The US population has increased by about 100 million people over the last 40 years, 1980 - 2020.
https://usafacts.org/state-of-the-union/population/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=ND-StatsData&msclkid=10a89e37a35a1e9b9998febe1d17a134
Better resource management is necessary. But it's not being discussed as the cause doesn't matter. Fewer resources do not allow for more people. A solution is not about blaming someone. It is about addressing the needs of life in the 21st Century. I also happen to like nature and our environment.
This is where innovation and common sense should intersect.
Edited on 28-04-2021 23:35




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