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THE FUTURE OF HYDROGEN POWER


THE FUTURE OF HYDROGEN POWER07-02-2021 18:04
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3189)
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.
07-02-2021 22:23
James___
★★★★★
(4150)
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.



The paste doesn't burn. You should've read the article. I did. What they also say is that a viable source of clean energy needs to be realized to allow that idea to be feasible.
The paste itself is safe and can store more energy than a li-ion battery. What the paste needs to cause a reaction is water. No water, no reaction.
07-02-2021 22:37
joseph369
☆☆☆☆☆
(5)
I don't see that hydrogen has much of a future. We still need fossil fuels to economically extract hydrogen. Why not just burn the fossil fuels directly?
07-02-2021 23:21
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8621)
joseph369 wrote:I don't see that hydrogen has much of a future. We still need fossil fuels to economically extract hydrogen. Why not just burn the fossil fuels directly?

Because fossils don't burn.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
08-02-2021 01:15
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3189)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.



The paste doesn't burn. You should've read the article. I did. What they also say is that a viable source of clean energy needs to be realized to allow that idea to be feasible.
The paste itself is safe and can store more energy than a li-ion battery. What the paste needs to cause a reaction is water. No water, no reaction.


Too bad it's so hard to find water... The paste also releases hydrogen, when heated to 250 F, not the difficult to achieve either. Basically, it's an energy dense material, waiting to be used, and abused...

Guess you didn't click the link, and read through the comments. Most didn't care about the cost, efficiency, or if any of it could be reused. Though some brought those points up, it wasn't a deal breaker, as long as it's not petroleum. Thought it was kind of telling, about what going 'green' really means.
08-02-2021 01:57
James___
★★★★★
(4150)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.



The paste doesn't burn. You should've read the article. I did. What they also say is that a viable source of clean energy needs to be realized to allow that idea to be feasible.
The paste itself is safe and can store more energy than a li-ion battery. What the paste needs to cause a reaction is water. No water, no reaction.


Too bad it's so hard to find water... The paste also releases hydrogen, when heated to 250 F, not the difficult to achieve either. Basically, it's an energy dense material, waiting to be used, and abused...

Guess you didn't click the link, and read through the comments. Most didn't care about the cost, efficiency, or if any of it could be reused. Though some brought those points up, it wasn't a deal breaker, as long as it's not petroleum. Thought it was kind of telling, about what going 'green' really means.



I'm glad that you're not the person who's been leading technological change.
We'd still be using the horse and buggy.
08-02-2021 03:11
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3189)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.



The paste doesn't burn. You should've read the article. I did. What they also say is that a viable source of clean energy needs to be realized to allow that idea to be feasible.
The paste itself is safe and can store more energy than a li-ion battery. What the paste needs to cause a reaction is water. No water, no reaction.


Too bad it's so hard to find water... The paste also releases hydrogen, when heated to 250 F, not the difficult to achieve either. Basically, it's an energy dense material, waiting to be used, and abused...

Guess you didn't click the link, and read through the comments. Most didn't care about the cost, efficiency, or if any of it could be reused. Though some brought those points up, it wasn't a deal breaker, as long as it's not petroleum. Thought it was kind of telling, about what going 'green' really means.



I'm glad that you're not the person who's been leading technological change.
We'd still be using the horse and buggy.


Technology is for make our lives better, less labor. What benefits do I get out of electric car? Higher price, operating cost? Stranded along side of the road for hours, charging my dead battery. I drive a Ford Explorer. Would a Mercedes get me to work any better? Just because it's new, doesn't make it better.

mRNA vaccines are new technology, have you gotten yours yet? I hear that if you hang out at a vaccination site, near closing time, they'll stab anybody, rather than throw doses in the trash...
08-02-2021 03:28
James___
★★★★★
(4150)
HarveyH55 wrote:

Technology is for make our lives better, less labor. What benefits do I get out of electric car? Higher price, operating cost? Stranded along side of the road for hours, charging my dead battery. I drive a Ford Explorer. Would a Mercedes get me to work any better? Just because it's new, doesn't make it better.

mRNA vaccines are new technology, have you gotten yours yet? I hear that if you hang out at a vaccination site, near closing time, they'll stab anybody, rather than throw doses in the trash...



The VA called me and made me an appt. I got my first shot last week.
What you're missing with the paste is that could lower the cost of owning an EV.
It'd be an inexpensive way to store energy. In the article they did mention that the goal is to recycle the materials used in the paste.
The article that I had read went into more detail. And with the paste it can be dispensed from a service station. If so, then the spent paste could be collected and recycled. So am not sure what you're on about. If small scale power plants are built, then it would be a source of clean energy.
As for what you drive, like myself, you are only one person. And with what I am pursuing, some of it is about advancing a technology that is already in use. Basically a better solar panel. Kind of why I'd need the experiment that I'm pursuing to be successful Then as a disabled Veteran I could finally have a life. Discrimination because of my service connected disabilities got old a couple of decades ago. Kind of why I have goals that I've been pursuing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCy-a_E2I3s
08-02-2021 04:06
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15047)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.



The paste doesn't burn. You should've read the article. I did. What they also say is that a viable source of clean energy needs to be realized to allow that idea to be feasible.
The paste itself is safe and can store more energy than a li-ion battery. What the paste needs to cause a reaction is water. No water, no reaction.


Too bad it's so hard to find water... The paste also releases hydrogen, when heated to 250 F, not the difficult to achieve either. Basically, it's an energy dense material, waiting to be used, and abused...

Guess you didn't click the link, and read through the comments. Most didn't care about the cost, efficiency, or if any of it could be reused. Though some brought those points up, it wasn't a deal breaker, as long as it's not petroleum. Thought it was kind of telling, about what going 'green' really means.



I'm glad that you're not the person who's been leading technological change.
We'd still be using the horse and buggy.


Technology is for make our lives better, less labor. What benefits do I get out of electric car? Higher price, operating cost? Stranded along side of the road for hours, charging my dead battery. I drive a Ford Explorer. Would a Mercedes get me to work any better? Just because it's new, doesn't make it better.

mRNA vaccines are new technology, have you gotten yours yet? I hear that if you hang out at a vaccination site, near closing time, they'll stab anybody, rather than throw doses in the trash...

Technology has no purpose, unless it succeeds in the marketplace.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
08-02-2021 05:45
SwanProfile picture★★☆☆☆
(393)
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2021/02/06/the-future-of-hydrogen-power-is-paste/

Saw this article, and figured I'd share... I didn't dig in deep, and click the source link, for which the article was written. Mostly, it was the comment section, after the article, that should give a good chuckle.

We've been promised hydrogen-powered engines for some time now. One downside though is the need for hydrogen vehicles to have heavy high-pressure tanks. While a 700 bar tank and the accompanying fuel cell is acceptable for a city bus or a truck, it becomes problematic with smaller vehicles, especially ones such as scooters or even full-sized motorcycles. The Fraunhofer Institute wants to run smaller vehicles on magnesium hydride in a paste form that they call POWERPASTE.

The idea is that the paste effectively stores hydrogen at normal temperature and pressure. At 250C, the paste decomposes and releases its hydrogen. While your motorcycle may seem hot when parked in the sun, it isn't getting quite to 250C.


Interestingly, the paste only provides half the available hydrogen. The rest is from water added start a reaction to release the hydrogen. Fraunhofer claims the energy density available is greater than that of a 700 bar tank in a conventional hydrogen system and ten times more than current battery technology.

One thing that's attractive is that the paste is easy to store and pump. A gas station, for example, could invest $20-30,000 and dispense the paste from a metal drum to meet low demand and then scale up as needed. A hydrogen pumping setup starts at about $1.2 million. Fraunhofer is building a pilot production plant that will produce about four tons of the material a year.

This isn't a totally new idea, of course. Using metal hydrides to store hydrogen chemically has other proponents, including French company McPhy energy. There have also been schemes to use other hydrides in powder form as well as chemical hydrogen carriers like formic acid and ammonia.


Obviously, they aren't concerned about cost, or efficiency. Not to mention safety, or probable alternative uses of this fuel paste. Got a hunch this paste would be hard to extinguish, if set on fire, and it would burn pretty hot, explosively as well. With the 'greens' also being anti-gun, this paste might also be used in place of gunpowder, for a new generation of firearms. Pretty cool of them, mess with one tool, but hand us something that can work just as well...

I didn't leave a comment, which usually gets deleted anyway... My comments are automatically moderated, since I'm a frequent offender. These people are totally absorb in the 'green' thing.


Hydrogen is damn near useless or too dangerous as fuel as every aspect has been tried

08-02-2021 08:34
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3189)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:

Technology is for make our lives better, less labor. What benefits do I get out of electric car? Higher price, operating cost? Stranded along side of the road for hours, charging my dead battery. I drive a Ford Explorer. Would a Mercedes get me to work any better? Just because it's new, doesn't make it better.

mRNA vaccines are new technology, have you gotten yours yet? I hear that if you hang out at a vaccination site, near closing time, they'll stab anybody, rather than throw doses in the trash...



The VA called me and made me an appt. I got my first shot last week.
What you're missing with the paste is that could lower the cost of owning an EV.
It'd be an inexpensive way to store energy. In the article they did mention that the goal is to recycle the materials used in the paste.
The article that I had read went into more detail. And with the paste it can be dispensed from a service station. If so, then the spent paste could be collected and recycled. So am not sure what you're on about. If small scale power plants are built, then it would be a source of clean energy.
As for what you drive, like myself, you are only one person. And with what I am pursuing, some of it is about advancing a technology that is already in use. Basically a better solar panel. Kind of why I'd need the experiment that I'm pursuing to be successful Then as a disabled Veteran I could finally have a life. Discrimination because of my service connected disabilities got old a couple of decades ago. Kind of why I have goals that I've been pursuing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCy-a_E2I3s


Cost money and energy to produce the hydrogen for the paste. Unsure of how recyclable, just because it could be, doesn't mean it's practical, or cost effective. If the waste paste isn't recycled, it's not really clean energy.
08-02-2021 16:26
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8621)
Swan wrote:Hydrogen is damn near useless or too dangerous as fuel as every aspect has been tried

The Hindenberg wasn't using hydrogen as fuel, and the Zeppelin program proved the usefulness of hydrogen if you ignore its dangers.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
08-02-2021 17:20
James___
★★★★★
(4150)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Cost money and energy to produce the hydrogen for the paste. Unsure of how recyclable, just because it could be, doesn't mean it's practical, or cost effective. If the waste paste isn't recycled, it's not really clean energy.



Cost money and energy to produce the hydrogen for the paste.


You mean it can create jobs?

If the waste paste isn't recycled, it's not really clean energy.



Since the paste dissolves in water meaning that it is water soluble, in a magnetic field, magnesium becomes paramagnetic. It will be attracted to metal.
Processes can be developed by understanding the materials properties.
08-02-2021 21:27
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3189)
It's not metallic magnesium, both the paste, and the waste, are salts.
09-02-2021 00:09
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15047)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Hydrogen is damn near useless or too dangerous as fuel as every aspect has been tried

The Hindenberg wasn't using hydrogen as fuel, and the Zeppelin program proved the usefulness of hydrogen if you ignore its dangers.

.


The Hindenberg didn't burn from the hydrogen. As soon as the enveloped was breached, the hydrogen was vented.

It burned because the envelope was covered in a flammable dope, commonly used in aircraft. The burning hydrogen is what started the dope on fire.

Static electricity is what started the initial fire.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
09-02-2021 00:17
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8621)
Into the Night wrote:The Hindenberg didn't burn from the hydrogen.

I'm thinking that Pete Rogers is correct. The Hindenberg experienced a Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction which converted it into a fusion reactor and it became thermally enhanced.

When people started jumping from the flying ball of flame, they were performing negative work.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
09-02-2021 01:03
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15047)
IBdaMann wrote:
Into the Night wrote:The Hindenberg didn't burn from the hydrogen.

I'm thinking that Pete Rogers is correct. The Hindenberg experienced a Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction which converted it into a fusion reactor and it became thermally enhanced.

When people started jumping from the flying ball of flame, they were performing negative work.

.


So 'negative work' results in a splat and your body being burned by a huge hunk of aluminum and burning fabric landing on it?

That's definitely a negative outcome.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
09-02-2021 03:36
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8621)
Into the Night wrote:So 'negative work' results in a splat and your body being burned by a huge hunk of aluminum and burning fabric landing on it?

Well, I think you are being somewhat dismissive by using the oversimplified term "splat." It's more of Kelvin-Helmholtz effect when one's fluids achieve substantially differing velocities.



.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist




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