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Crazy...18-10-2019 22:17
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
https://www.wftv.com/news/national-news/ap-top-news/climate-has-fonda-picking-up-where-she-left-off-in-the-1970s/999055809

Guess using children isn't having the impact they hoped for, so now they are raiding the nursing homes... Could have sworn she died years ago, maybe it was just her career... Story doesn't say what she was doing, to warrant the arrest of an 81 year old protester. You'd figure that law enforcement would have handle civil disobedience with the same sense of amusement, as with the children a couple weeks ago...
19-10-2019 13:14
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://www.wftv.com/news/national-news/ap-top-news/climate-has-fonda-picking-up-where-she-left-off-in-the-1970s/999055809

Guess using children isn't having the impact they hoped for, so now they are raiding the nursing homes... Could have sworn she died years ago, maybe it was just her career... Story doesn't say what she was doing, to warrant the arrest of an 81 year old protester. You'd figure that law enforcement would have handle civil disobedience with the same sense of amusement, as with the children a couple weeks ago...


Old people can be concerned about the environment too.


IBdaMann wrote:
"Air" is not a body in and of itself. Ergo it is not a blackbody.


Planck's law describes the spectral density of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a black body in thermal equilibrium at a given temperature T.
19-10-2019 15:22
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
https://www.wftv.com/news/national-news/ap-top-news/climate-has-fonda-picking-up-where-she-left-off-in-the-1970s/999055809

Guess using children isn't having the impact they hoped for, so now they are raiding the nursing homes... Could have sworn she died years ago, maybe it was just her career... Story doesn't say what she was doing, to warrant the arrest of an 81 year old protester. You'd figure that law enforcement would have handle civil disobedience with the same sense of amusement, as with the children a couple weeks ago...


Old people can be concerned about the environment too.


But, to go out and get arrested? Seems more like a publicity stunt, like what killed her career. Doubt she actual cares, or even knows what she was protesting, just wanted to let people know she was still alive. Personally, I think most of the people who 'care', only want the attention for themselves, but don't actually care enough to actually do anything, beside talk. It's not fun and trending, when it gets down to carbon-taxing, or personal sacrifices. Several counties have already found that out, though they still push the taxes. A lot of people in France, Canada, Germany, California, aren't happy about it, just to name a few.
19-10-2019 17:12
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real and action must be taken or people will suffer. As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care
19-10-2019 21:45
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
spot wrote:
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real and action must be taken or people will suffer. As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care


I care too, but from the economic/financial threat, not the environmental phantom. The battle plan is very expensive, beyond the means of any country, and is going to have a huge negative economic impact on everyone. Replacing, want took centuries to develop and build, with renewable technology, in just a few decades, is reckless, and greatly increases the cost. You order something online, postage is reasonable, if you can wait 5-7 days. If you want next day delivery, it'll cost a whole lot more. Sometimes, you have no choice, maybe a part for your car, so your job isn't at risk, or you have to spend about the same on a rental, or alternative transportation. The trade wars tariffs/agreements is having a huge economic impact. The House is holding up the North American agreement, which would solve a lot of problems, but not during an election year (bastards). The China agreement would go smoother, but the House's presidential investigations, never-ending, gives China hope of a different, softer president, and no change, or better agreement for them. We change economics more drastically than the environmental conditions.

Climate change alternatives are more expensive, we need at least three different 'renewable' generating schemes, to replace on fossil fuel plant. Solar and wind only produce, when the sun is shining, the wind blowing, have to add one more, to fill in the gaps, or simple shut down section of the power grid, and let people fend for themselves during blackouts.
19-10-2019 23:34
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
HarveyH55 wrote:
spot wrote:
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real and action must be taken or people will suffer. As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care


I care too, but from the economic/financial threat, not the environmental phantom. The battle plan is very expensive, beyond the means of any country, and is going to have a huge negative economic impact on everyone. Replacing, want took centuries to develop and build, with renewable technology, in just a few decades, is reckless, and greatly increases the cost. You order something online, postage is reasonable, if you can wait 5-7 days. If you want next day delivery, it'll cost a whole lot more. Sometimes, you have no choice, maybe a part for your car, so your job isn't at risk, or you have to spend about the same on a rental, or alternative transportation. The trade wars tariffs/agreements is having a huge economic impact. The House is holding up the North American agreement, which would solve a lot of problems, but not during an election year (bastards). The China agreement would go smoother, but the House's presidential investigations, never-ending, gives China hope of a different, softer president, and no change, or better agreement for them. We change economics more drastically than the environmental conditions.

Climate change alternatives are more expensive, we need at least three different 'renewable' generating schemes, to replace on fossil fuel plant. Solar and wind only produce, when the sun is shining, the wind blowing, have to add one more, to fill in the gaps, or simple shut down section of the power grid, and let people fend for themselves during blackouts.


Why should I listen to someone who doesn't understand basic physics when it comes to economics?


IBdaMann wrote:
"Air" is not a body in and of itself. Ergo it is not a blackbody.


Planck's law describes the spectral density of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a black body in thermal equilibrium at a given temperature T.
20-10-2019 02:36
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
spot wrote:
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real and action must be taken or people will suffer. As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care


I care too, but from the economic/financial threat, not the environmental phantom. The battle plan is very expensive, beyond the means of any country, and is going to have a huge negative economic impact on everyone. Replacing, want took centuries to develop and build, with renewable technology, in just a few decades, is reckless, and greatly increases the cost. You order something online, postage is reasonable, if you can wait 5-7 days. If you want next day delivery, it'll cost a whole lot more. Sometimes, you have no choice, maybe a part for your car, so your job isn't at risk, or you have to spend about the same on a rental, or alternative transportation. The trade wars tariffs/agreements is having a huge economic impact. The House is holding up the North American agreement, which would solve a lot of problems, but not during an election year (bastards). The China agreement would go smoother, but the House's presidential investigations, never-ending, gives China hope of a different, softer president, and no change, or better agreement for them. We change economics more drastically than the environmental conditions.

Climate change alternatives are more expensive, we need at least three different 'renewable' generating schemes, to replace on fossil fuel plant. Solar and wind only produce, when the sun is shining, the wind blowing, have to add one more, to fill in the gaps, or simple shut down section of the power grid, and let people fend for themselves during blackouts.


Why should I listen to someone who doesn't understand basic physics when it comes to economics?


Physics and economics are two different topics. See, I already understand more than you... But why bother, you would never admit your ignorance.
20-10-2019 11:53
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
HarveyH55 wrote:

Physics and economics are two different topics. See, I already understand more than you... But why bother, you would never admit your ignorance.


They both require competence in math and discrimination between useful and useless information Understanding the basics of global warming theory is relatively simple. If you are unable to understand it it undermines your economic arguments IMHO.


IBdaMann wrote:
"Air" is not a body in and of itself. Ergo it is not a blackbody.


Planck's law describes the spectral density of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a black body in thermal equilibrium at a given temperature T.
20-10-2019 16:36
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:

Physics and economics are two different topics. See, I already understand more than you... But why bother, you would never admit your ignorance.


They both require competence in math and discrimination between useful and useless information Understanding the basics of global warming theory is relatively simple. If you are unable to understand it it undermines your economic arguments IMHO.



Why should I listen to someone who doesn't understand basic physics when it comes to economics?


Nothing wrong with my reading, and you were quite specific. Global Warming only make sense, if you don't think about it, you just accept. I think, and I question everything that doesn't make sense. I look into it further, to try and gain some understanding. The math and physic might work on paper, the lab, the computer, but it doesn't scale up well, and it's huge planet. All those small things, dismissed as unimportant, actually do serve a purpose, on a global scale. CO2 is vitally important to all life on this planet. It's the source of every carbon molecule, that makes every living thing. THAT is the basic truth, you can find anywhere. CO2 makes up only 0.04% of the total volume of the atmosphere, very tiny amount. Fossil Fuels are what made the modern world, and people are heavily dependent. Global warming is about shifting the dependence, and the wealth. None of the IPCC projections are true, since we've never been through global warming before. It's entirely speculation and consensus, mass marketed as factual. It nothing more than belief and acceptance.
20-10-2019 19:31
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
CO2 only makes up a small portion of of the atmosphere. You think I don't know that? John Tyndell knew that as well.

As I said your argument is unconvincing you seem emotionally attached to fossil fuels but other things have been found harmful and abandoned and civilisation is still here
20-10-2019 23:38
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(5011)
spot wrote:
CO2 only makes up a small portion of of the atmosphere. You think I don't know that? John Tyndell knew that as well.

You seem to think that you are the embodiment of a famous chemist. You are not.

You keep pointing to the one aspect of his research that has been discarded by science for not passing the scrutiny of the scientific method.

As I said your argument is unconvincing as you seem emotionally attached to the idea of a substance having magickal superpowers to defy the laws of physics even though civilization is still here after billions of years of CO2's existence.

.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

When the alt-physics birds sing about "indivisible bodies," we've got pure BS. - VernerHornung

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
20-10-2019 23:44
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
spot wrote:
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real
Define 'climate change'.
spot wrote:
and action must be taken or people will suffer.
What action? Define 'climate change'.
spot wrote:
As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care

Stern didn't define 'climate change' either. Define 'climate change'.


The Parrot Killer
20-10-2019 23:45
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
spot wrote:
What do you suggest we do.

Whilst I have not joined a protest and feel that disrupting commuters using public transport is counter productive climate change is real and action must be taken or people will suffer. As for the economic impacts many economists have looked into the the effects of climate change its not good look up the Stern report.

I care


I care too, but from the economic/financial threat, not the environmental phantom. The battle plan is very expensive, beyond the means of any country, and is going to have a huge negative economic impact on everyone. Replacing, want took centuries to develop and build, with renewable technology, in just a few decades, is reckless, and greatly increases the cost. You order something online, postage is reasonable, if you can wait 5-7 days. If you want next day delivery, it'll cost a whole lot more. Sometimes, you have no choice, maybe a part for your car, so your job isn't at risk, or you have to spend about the same on a rental, or alternative transportation. The trade wars tariffs/agreements is having a huge economic impact. The House is holding up the North American agreement, which would solve a lot of problems, but not during an election year (bastards). The China agreement would go smoother, but the House's presidential investigations, never-ending, gives China hope of a different, softer president, and no change, or better agreement for them. We change economics more drastically than the environmental conditions.

Climate change alternatives are more expensive, we need at least three different 'renewable' generating schemes, to replace on fossil fuel plant. Solar and wind only produce, when the sun is shining, the wind blowing, have to add one more, to fill in the gaps, or simple shut down section of the power grid, and let people fend for themselves during blackouts.


Why should I listen to someone who doesn't understand basic physics when it comes to economics?


Okay. You just admitted that you don't understand economics either.


The Parrot Killer
20-10-2019 23:49
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:

Physics and economics are two different topics. See, I already understand more than you... But why bother, you would never admit your ignorance.


They both require competence in math

No more than algebra and statistical mathematics. The part you deny is both.
spot wrote:
and discrimination between useful and useless information

You can't. You deny statistical mathematics and algebra.
spot wrote:
Understanding the basics of global warming theory is relatively simple.

Define 'global warming'. No theory is possible until you define the phrase 'global warming'.
spot wrote:
If you are unable to understand it it undermines your economic arguments IMHO.

Since you have not yet define either 'global warming' or 'climate change', you are obviously not able to understand it. Therefore, by your own arguments, you do not understand economics either.


The Parrot Killer
21-10-2019 00:53
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
HarveyH55 wrote:
spot wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:

Physics and economics are two different topics. See, I already understand more than you... But why bother, you would never admit your ignorance.


They both require competence in math and discrimination between useful and useless information Understanding the basics of global warming theory is relatively simple. If you are unable to understand it it undermines your economic arguments IMHO.



Why should I listen to someone who doesn't understand basic physics when it comes to economics?


Nothing wrong with my reading, and you were quite specific. Global Warming only make sense, if you don't think about it, you just accept. I think, and I question everything that doesn't make sense. I look into it further, to try and gain some understanding. The math and physic might work on paper, the lab, the computer, but it doesn't scale up well, and it's huge planet. All those small things, dismissed as unimportant, actually do serve a purpose, on a global scale. CO2 is vitally important to all life on this planet. It's the source of every carbon molecule, that makes every living thing. THAT is the basic truth, you can find anywhere. CO2 makes up only 0.04% of the total volume of the atmosphere, very tiny amount. Fossil Fuels are what made the modern world, and people are heavily dependent. Global warming is about shifting the dependence, and the wealth. None of the IPCC projections are true, since we've never been through global warming before. It's entirely speculation and consensus, mass marketed as factual. It nothing more than belief and acceptance.



That's funny. That's like Republicans saying prove us wrong. If not, then they're right. As McConnell and the Republican party has shown, the law only matters if you have the power to enforce it. Why McConnell is shaping the legal system to support the Republican party and not the law nor the constitution.
The Republican party does not support innovation if they cannot control it and profit from it. That's all they're about, making people about serving corporate America and the wealthy. Sounds like another recession is coming because that's what Republicans bring to the table when all they want is to keep America's wealth for themselves. If they bring another depression, America will never be what it was.
21-10-2019 01:23
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
Where in the Constitution, does it guaranty free money, and free stuff, to those to lazy to work for it themselves? Use to be, when folks fell on hard times, family, friends, neighbors helped out. That help was generally for a lifetime, freeloaders weren't tolerated long, so there was strong incentive to get your life back on track. Government handouts killed that, since they don't care, and the people enjoying the hard work and high taxes, aren't as generous, since the government is taking care of it. You don't think the socialist profit from government, or re-writing the constitution to better serve their agenda? Nancy declared the House's intent to move forward on impeachment, with the inquiry, but withheld the vote to officially start the process. This denies President Trump rights to a proper defense. Witnesses are interrogated behind closed doors, denied council. The results of the interrogations, are kept secret, except a few politically damaging points leaked out, to influence the 2020 election. And you believe it's the republicans abusing the constitution? Are you sure you didn't receive some sort of service related, sight disability, with the rest of your long list?
21-10-2019 01:32
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Are you sure you didn't receive some sort of service related, sight disability, with the rest of your long list?


That's real classy Harvey, attacking a disabled Veteran based on their service connected disabilities. That's how you prove your point? Kind of makes me think that you are nothing more than a loser who needs to get a life. But that is what America's become.
21-10-2019 06:14
spot
★★★★☆
(1102)
IBdaMann wrote:
spot wrote:
CO2 only makes up a small portion of of the atmosphere. You think I don't know that? John Tyndell knew that as well.

You seem to think that you are the embodiment of a famous chemist. You are not.

You keep pointing to the one aspect of his research that has been discarded by science for not passing the scrutiny of the scientific method.

As I said your argument is unconvincing as you seem emotionally attached to the idea of a substance having magickal superpowers to defy the laws of physics even though civilization is still here after billions of years of CO2's existence.

.


No I'm just pointing out that what I claim is not novel or some arcane secret. Unlike your Gnostic physics. I have got you pair of clowns excited.


IBdaMann wrote:
"Air" is not a body in and of itself. Ergo it is not a blackbody.


Planck's law describes the spectral density of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a black body in thermal equilibrium at a given temperature T.
21-10-2019 16:53
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
Looking at the temperature graphs, the only steady rise, is that of the computer generated projections. The graphs with actually temperature readings rise and fall. We are constantly producing CO2, in larger quantities, each year, or so we are told, even with all the renewable online. If CO2 was causing warming, there would be a steady rise, year after year. Seems like an obvious flaw. Where are the signs that the end is near? 40 years, we've been threatened with unbearable heat, droughts, melting ice, rising seas, extreme weather, flooding. I notice no clear signs that anything has change, we've always had extreme environmental events occasionally, all the way back to biblical times, and likely beyond. Some of the worst events happened long before we burned fossil fuels, and fortunately haven't repeat since. It doesn't live up to the hype, the urgency. Plausible, doesn't make it real. There thousands of works of fiction, which sold well, because the story was plausible, believable.
21-10-2019 17:32
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(5011)
HarveyH55 wrote:we've always had extreme environmental events occasionally, all the way back to biblical times, and likely beyond.

... and there are extreme weather events on other planets.

Maybe tmiddles can explain Venus which has no anthropogenic anything ... or does it?


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

When the alt-physics birds sing about "indivisible bodies," we've got pure BS. - VernerHornung

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
21-10-2019 17:47
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
IBdaMann wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:we've always had extreme environmental events occasionally, all the way back to biblical times, and likely beyond.

... and there are extreme weather events on other planets.

Maybe tmiddles can explain Venus which has no anthropogenic anything ... or does it?



Wish you would have asked Harvey this one. It's why math and science can be so interesting. What would explain Venus is that the Sun's gravity is that much greater in that orbit than it is 1 au from the Sun. This gets into astrophysics though and that's largely ignored.
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.
Kind of like the everglades isn't as large as it used to be. Anthropogenic change.
This is a strange aspect of Christians in the US. They support the Republican party yet don't care what happens to the land and what's on it when the Bible says that we're supposed to be it's caretakers.
21-10-2019 17:54
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
James___ wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


spot-
Into the Night is also has delusions of comptance
21-10-2019 21:03
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Most of the SOTC is a desert climate. Even coastal cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles are affected by this environment.

During the winter and spring rains, these grasses grow quickly all over the SOTC. As the season turns to summer, these grasses dry out. This is normal for this type of environment.

As the season turns to fall, winds that are the reverse of the usual onshore breezes begin to appear and can become quite strong. In each place such winds occur, they are given different names. In Hawaii, for example, they are called the Kona winds. Here in Washington, they are called the Chinook winds. In the SOTC, they are called the Santa Ana winds.

Offshore winds around areas with mountain ranges can set up what is called a compression wave. The mountains force the winds up. As they come down the leeward side, the air actually compresses quite a bit. Like any compressing air, it gets hot. This normally happens on the east side of such a mountain range, but when the winds reverse, it happens on the west side; where all these grasses, now dried out, are standing.

Even a dewdrop can start a fire. Being autumn approaching, upper air is cooling off faster than surface air, and lightning storms become common. One stroke on the ground is all it takes to start a brush fire. Other causes are auto accidents, idiots chucking cigarette butts out the window, downed power lines caused by winds, etc. Once it gets going, there is little to stop it. It goes up almost like gasoline soaked paper.

In the past, California didn't have as many homes built out in brush prone areas. Today, in the SOTC, that's changed. Also in the past, California would go around and thin or reduce these grasses near houses so they wouldn't be such a fire hazard. Each community contributed to this work simply to protect themselves. Today, in the SOTC, environmentalists have prohibited this practice, stating that the grasses offer a unique environment for various critters that live in it. So the grasses stay untouched.

Another brush is also involved, the creosote bush. These normally withstand minor burns from grass but their normal lifecycle involves dying to spread its seeds. These become the so-called 'tumbleweeds' of the West. Blown by the winds, the dead brush scatters its seeds as it rolls around. They can become quite prevalent in some areas, and even produce mountains of tumbleweeds stacked against houses by the winds. You can imagine the fire hazard so many tumbleweeds stacked against stuff can be.

This weed too, has become protected by environmentalists.

So, fires have become more a problem, and because of the houses spreading outward into brush prone areas, have become more damaging to homes.

Life in the SOTC.


The Parrot Killer
22-10-2019 00:13
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(5011)
spot wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:You keep pointing to the one aspect of his research that has been discarded by science for not passing the scrutiny of the scientific method.

No I'm just pointing out that what I claim is not novel or some arcane secret.

You are specifically clinging to something that has been discarded by the scientific method. That makes your claim wrong until you develop some new science to support it.


.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

When the alt-physics birds sing about "indivisible bodies," we've got pure BS. - VernerHornung

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
22-10-2019 04:47
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
Into the Night wrote:
Even a dewdrop can start a fire.

Interesting. Never thought about a water droplet causing a fire. Acting like a magnifying glass I assume?

Into the Night wrote:In the past, California didn't have as many homes built out in brush prone areas. Today, in the SOTC, that's changed. Also in the past, California would go around and thin or reduce these grasses near houses so they wouldn't be such a fire hazard. Each community contributed to this work simply to protect themselves. Today, in the SOTC, environmentalists have prohibited this practice, stating that the grasses offer a unique environment for various critters that live in it. So the grasses stay untouched.

Another brush is also involved, the creosote bush. These normally withstand minor burns from grass but their normal lifecycle involves dying to spread its seeds. These become the so-called 'tumbleweeds' of the West. Blown by the winds, the dead brush scatters its seeds as it rolls around. They can become quite prevalent in some areas, and even produce mountains of tumbleweeds stacked against houses by the winds. You can imagine the fire hazard so many tumbleweeds stacked against stuff can be.

This weed too, has become protected by environmentalists.

Just disgusting how liberals will literally put weeds in front of human life.

Into the Night wrote:Life in the SOTC.

OK, dumb question...still can't figure out SOTC! What is it?

Sad Over Taxed California?



spot-
Into the Night is also has delusions of comptance
22-10-2019 04:58
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
We use to respect natural forces. and understand that we could stop or change them, just deal with the damage, and maybe take a few adaptive measures to reduce the impact. That was before insurance, and federal disaster relief funds. Rather than individuals, and communities working together, to protect what they own, they no longer have to worry about it, since they don't really lose that much in a natural disaster. Insurance and the government will pick up the tab, and buy them all new things, build them a new house. It's not that the natural disasters have gotten any worse than in the past, it's just that people got cheap and lazy about protecting their property. Part of it, is that there are more people renting, than actually owning where they live. A lot of those rental properties aren't owned by an individual, but by companies, more concerned about profit. You don't get rich, spending your own money, so they use their votes, to compel the legislation to pick up the tab, for protecting their investments. People who rent, don't really care about the building, unless it's falling apart, or infested. They aren't going out to do any preventative work, or hire people to do it, it's the property owners responsibility. Property owners feel they pay taxes, so it's the governments responsibility. Nobody wants to take personal responsibility for their own lives and property anymore. It's like James blaming all his personal problems on the government, the doctors, and everyone not from Noway, when it's his life, and his choices to accept, and do nothing to change what he doesn't like about himself.
22-10-2019 05:26
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.
22-10-2019 05:33
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.


spot-
Into the Night is also has delusions of comptance
22-10-2019 06:16
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects
Edited on 22-10-2019 06:36
22-10-2019 06:49
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects


The only thing that waters grass is rain. 2 inches of moist topsoil and it grows fine. What happens 200 feet down is meaningless to the grass.

Are you saying the topsoil would be moist for a longer period of time if no one pumped a drop from the ground? Bullshit.


spot-
Into the Night is also has delusions of comptance
22-10-2019 07:09
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects


The only thing that waters grass is rain. 2 inches of moist topsoil and it grows fine. What happens 200 feet down is meaningless to the grass.

Are you saying the topsoil would be moist for a longer period of time if no one pumped a drop from the ground? Bullshit.



GasGuzzler, it actually works that way. If you look at the data, the more the water table drops, the more fires there are. In Arizona, the valley that Phoenix sits in has sunk 20 feet since the 1950's. The link is about California.
https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-groundwater-20150318-story.html
Edited on 22-10-2019 07:10
22-10-2019 07:19
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
GasGuzzler wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Even a dewdrop can start a fire.

Interesting. Never thought about a water droplet causing a fire. Acting like a magnifying glass I assume?

Yup. That's exactly what it does.
GasGuzzler wrote:
Into the Night wrote:In the past, California didn't have as many homes built out in brush prone areas. Today, in the SOTC, that's changed. Also in the past, California would go around and thin or reduce these grasses near houses so they wouldn't be such a fire hazard. Each community contributed to this work simply to protect themselves. Today, in the SOTC, environmentalists have prohibited this practice, stating that the grasses offer a unique environment for various critters that live in it. So the grasses stay untouched.

Another brush is also involved, the creosote bush. These normally withstand minor burns from grass but their normal lifecycle involves dying to spread its seeds. These become the so-called 'tumbleweeds' of the West. Blown by the winds, the dead brush scatters its seeds as it rolls around. They can become quite prevalent in some areas, and even produce mountains of tumbleweeds stacked against houses by the winds. You can imagine the fire hazard so many tumbleweeds stacked against stuff can be.

This weed too, has become protected by environmentalists.

Just disgusting how liberals will literally put weeds in front of human life.

Very true.
GasGuzzler wrote:
Into the Night wrote:Life in the SOTC.

OK, dumb question...still can't figure out SOTC! What is it?

Sad Over Taxed California?


The SOTC: The Socialist Oligarchy of the Territory of California.

I no longer consider California a State of the Union. They ignore the Constitution of the United States and they ignore their own State constitution.


The Parrot Killer
22-10-2019 07:27
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified?
It isn't.
James___ wrote:
In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep.
A typical well in the SOTC is about 150 ft deep, same as Washington.
James___ wrote:
The problem now they say is that it's like brine.
It can be. A lot depends on the well.
James___ wrote:
I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.

You never read them anyway.


The Parrot Killer
22-10-2019 07:30
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects


Nope. Has nothing to do with dry grass and tumbleweeds.


The Parrot Killer
22-10-2019 07:31
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9806)
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects


The only thing that waters grass is rain. 2 inches of moist topsoil and it grows fine. What happens 200 feet down is meaningless to the grass.

Are you saying the topsoil would be moist for a longer period of time if no one pumped a drop from the ground? Bullshit.



GasGuzzler, it actually works that way. If you look at the data, the more the water table drops, the more fires there are. In Arizona, the valley that Phoenix sits in has sunk 20 feet since the 1950's. The link is about California.
https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-groundwater-20150318-story.html


Nope. Neither grass nor tumbleweeds have roots 150 feet deep.


The Parrot Killer
22-10-2019 07:39
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James wrote:
The fires in California are anthropogenic. If water tables weren't so depleted then the grass and brush wouldn't be so dry.

I'm not familiar with California grass and brush. Must be one hell of a deep root system. My well at my house goes down 185 feet. I'm pretty sure none of the brush roots get down that far.


Why is the area around Seattle considered liquified? In California wells can be over 2,000 feet deep. The problem now they say is that it's like brine. I won't bother going into geological processes. Libraries have books. Reading them helps.


Dude, you said the grass and brush turn brown because the water table is low...as if they are nourished by the water in the water table. Overuse of water has NOTHING to do with dead brush.



It actually does. It's called the capillary effect. Water in this case is attracted to water. If you take a long bath, your skin will wrinkle. This is because water flows to the greater volume of water.
There's more water in your bath than in you, ergo, the water in your body is flowing literally into your bath tub. This can cause you to become dehydrated as well. Why limiting your time in water matters.
And with California, water through the capillary effect tries to replenish the water tables. This is why the brush and grass are a fire hazard. And it's man made climate change.
The solution is desalination which would increase the price of your fruits and vegetables about tenfold. Why it's not being done. And why draining the Great Lakes is a good thing


This link explains that water is attracted to water. You can call it an electrostatic attraction if you like. What needs to be considered is if what is between the water table and the topsoil is polarized to act as a capillary to move surface water towards the water table.
I'm of the opinion that it does. Water tables do replenish for a reason.
https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/adhesion-and-cohesion-water?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects


The only thing that waters grass is rain. 2 inches of moist topsoil and it grows fine. What happens 200 feet down is meaningless to the grass.

Are you saying the topsoil would be moist for a longer period of time if no one pumped a drop from the ground? Bullshit.



GasGuzzler, it actually works that way. If you look at the data, the more the water table drops, the more fires there are. In Arizona, the valley that Phoenix sits in has sunk 20 feet since the 1950's. The link is about California.
https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-groundwater-20150318-story.html


Nope. Neither grass nor tumbleweeds have roots 150 feet deep.


Are these the grassroots that you're talking about?
https://youtu.be/5nZnqtDdsws

To get into this is sad, gravity attracts what? Move closer towards the Earth's core and matter becomes denser. This increases its gravitational effect. Pretty boring and basic stuff. Kind of why the Earth has an iron core. It's extremely dense, hot and molten.
Why gravity draws water away from the surface and creates water tables and aquifers. But as I said, it's some pretty boring stuff.
Edited on 22-10-2019 08:06
22-10-2019 11:11
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
It's not the lack of water. The underbrush that burns so easy, is seasonal, dies off every year, preparing for the winter. The roots are generally fine, for some of them, others just die, and need to start fresh from seeds.

You do realize that California is mostly rocks and mountain terrain? The rain water mostly runs off, what seeps into the ground, isn't pulled past the roots of plants, faster tha the plants can drink their fill.
22-10-2019 15:47
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
James,
The water tables drop due to lack of rain, which is also creating wildfire conditions at the surface. Nothing to do with overuse of water. Right, boring stuff.
22-10-2019 16:33
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
GasGuzzler wrote:
James,
The water tables drop due to lack of rain, which is also creating wildfire conditions at the surface. Nothing to do with overuse of water. Right, boring stuff.


Democrats like James are away looking for something to call a problem, involving people, as an excuse to steal money, to spend fixing a non-issue.
22-10-2019 23:50
James___
★★★★☆
(1691)
Nope. I'm basically pursuing something of interest to me while the two of you are doing nothing. You guys don't even understand ecosystems or how water tables function. Doesn't leave much to talk about with the two you.
Maybe you guys pull each other's fingers to see what happens? And if something happens you say that your experiment was a success and you guys know how methane gas is produced, by eating beans the musical fruit.
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