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The Fastest Way To Solve Climate Change Problem Is Making Plant Trees Become A Competitive Sport


The Fastest Way To Solve Climate Change Problem Is Making Plant Trees Become A Competitive Sport26-01-2021 06:41
SaviorLife
☆☆☆☆☆
(24)
The Fastest Way To Solve Climate Change Problem Is Making Plant Trees Become A Competitive Sport
Source: https://saviorjoy.livejournal.com/; http://freejoy.aimoo.com

The two most popular signal of climate change is sea level raising and much more CO2 emission release on the air. You cannot avoid it, you must deal with it.
You must "capture/using" water and CO2 as much as possible at the fastest speed as possible.

The only one human activity can do both things is planting trees, because trees is the only one thing can capture both CO2 and water at the same time.

In order to raise public awareness and have a reason for all kind of military weapon can be used, you must making plant trees as a real competitive sport. And in this sport you can have a lot of different categories but the first one must be planting as many trees as possible in any location on Earth.

By doing that, you can allow other countries go into very hash weather location such as dessert to planting trees legally.
If you look at the planet Earth map, the best places to plant trees are Australia and the Africa, since they are have a lot of sunshine but lack of water from rivers/lakes.
But in order to use all kind of military tools to create rivers which connect direct to the ocean, you must have a public legal reason.

The contest could be all team/nations have a same desert area like 10000 square km2, within 1 year which team can have the most quantity/quality of tree who capture the most amount of CO2 + Water will become the winner and receive a lot of prize wealth.

Of course you need to pay the citizens in those planting tree nations (Australia, Africa) a fair amount of money from $1000 to $5000 per year depend on their location/GDP.

To summary, the best and fastest solution to solve the global climate change problems is planting as many tree as possible and in order to do that with public agreement you must make it like a competitive sport.

The formula to planting tree is creating as many rivers/lakes as possible first (you should use bomb), then drop the seeds/leafs from above (aircraft). Water + Sunshine = Trees.

Over the last 50 years, the population is increase at rapid speed, but the trees/forest area is not, and that is one of main reason you have what so called climate change global warming.

I do believe that my solution/strategy is the best one to save this civilization from the natural catastrophe and climate change/global warming problem, so you can send the reward/donation to my cryptocurrency wallets below:

Bitcoin

1GihDtqz2JeTHekX5C7DxzyoBMgyL9sNiC

1MFGJ2u4BTY6T5323HF3fEMpcg4akxoVQw

1L2gaW1gHhP8j7goHkdyQ7XAtst4ncxUCu

1FfAtQWJCEeNwCn6mpmL61miSK3nE8Pg5y

1PZv3iB2MF25FbBs51aVAPvb1pxr5Le5Cz

Ethereum

0x11348E48f8Dd43493D75D49ac2358849A5A0919A

0x4C8fFA3A0c78D6e60EF1E6351F49be0cCFeC62ed

0xaC2E83E2cD6BC15b0c1b9426bbe749D32061a40d

0x31eA6c71A255155386896F333919CCddC9096cB6

0x5619FAeA81d621d9DCE831D3C2E19b0238b2FA17

Litecoin

LRU55KzZtJ1ViqCpFBVygRXsZJCMrCC3Mg

LcWoEwzGEQBpkLVAk32whr76v6ZLo7UUiH

LXdDZLvoxf3Qq5X8pvaro1xAdBXJ7tui9u

LbjWtntp1Lef4YFL8cVxguXVABcTCwSTvM

LbjvKbbSDFAZdfrQY4KEegDws4q8Cq86Yb

Dogecoin

D7hd9tZgvbfFPb17kdwiKcgPEYpHSJz7wk

DHaofih9U7UK47zYesoHhArCiEP6vDj8hi

DU7jGUZjxVzxetjqBvuBpWhgxu8L3KyWuN

DBVr92TgqrLgH7x3pdsditxPm6qxcNrjQC

DQX1BjgHwgetwVWYqYh5JTPQsFF2B8hRr1

Monero

48R9otZW8UrJoGZ3JdtUjTQr9fgVsx9zsGNNETGGmm8vGXRw8sjeSwbNJT1c3ypmNFRcSDBcKG51fKkeBYSahpuRBgYQ4k8

49fcN7YU6xnfq8xAGejTicL3PcQvhYwLKHBwneDPvsEUTdFkbQvrinrJL4y4kpKRDjDM4WPsQAW58QDgLJWyRazZ5Xq3jzc

43RxCt1QnRhSQhiD9emuxgGFEbr2B8qAqEEBQyHiEqXteXVM6nMz8xHV2pCHeqf3kybtMSw2tcRteZZAryVF7HPjN4RJEr9

42wJPQy2kTXGMGrVwr9XcxjMfegehVw9Rbbe6HUnwbK9SvdtuK8Mqa4AHPq2SwV9oMM2mJWcqksN3dwhguM4kbHFKrFTvTE

45p2MBpoAc9L5oz95gKR7Q62seV1hLauJZ4azropCgv4XhL7n7kmGUEShxi98wbt7aSdrjw9w3quggEsdDseREeEJLJy7DH

Digibyte

DHNMsFVQQruZscnPZ39b2cuQy5AQnwwW97

DHyRrst5LmSKQR9draJ8YKNLoTCBUJX8sj

DRXj1hnH6r8wBjWtjygYVwrNXFoAVuHiJe

DL4CAfLNSqNWU9AqrxHdstQgJr9ktV4uph

D6P9LtSKFtLvxHLuRajbcv29Npfht82Uj9

Best Regard,
The Savior Messiah Mahdi Maitreya Kalki Christ Saoshyant Buddha

Source: https://saviorjoy.livejournal.com/; http://freejoy.aimoo.com
26-01-2021 07:08
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
Define 'climate change'. Define 'global warming'. There is no such thing as a global climate. Earth contains many climates.
26-01-2021 10:32
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3195)
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...
26-01-2021 14:22
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
26-01-2021 17:26
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3195)
I was figuring it would be simple enough to remember, like logon passwords for websites. Be kind of tough to spend cryptocurrency, if you have to carry around, and type in a bunch of characters... I sort of thought the long stings, were like account numbers, like above, the 'wallet', and there was a simple password to access. Considering the repetitious nature of his posts, figure there was a pattern, and likely a few keywords, that were also passwords. Couldn't be too hard to copy the wallet numbers, and write a script to try some of the unique choice of words, common in the posts.
26-01-2021 22:12
James___
★★★★★
(4159)
SaviorLife wrote:
The Fastest Way To Solve Climate Change Problem Is



Just get rid of the people. Problem solved.
27-01-2021 00:12
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was figuring it would be simple enough to remember, like logon passwords for websites. Be kind of tough to spend cryptocurrency, if you have to carry around, and type in a bunch of characters... I sort of thought the long stings, were like account numbers, like above, the 'wallet', and there was a simple password to access. Considering the repetitious nature of his posts, figure there was a pattern, and likely a few keywords, that were also passwords. Couldn't be too hard to copy the wallet numbers, and write a script to try some of the unique choice of words, common in the posts.


For traveling, one can buy and use 'hardware wallets'. These you carry with you, like real wallets. They contain a private and public key just like any wallet, but your private key is stored in the device itself. They look like a glorified USB stick or perhaps a bit like the old MP3 players.




The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 27-01-2021 00:12
27-01-2021 03:15
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8625)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was figuring it would be simple enough to remember, like logon passwords for websites. Be kind of tough to spend cryptocurrency, if you have to carry around, and type in a bunch of characters... I sort of thought the long stings, were like account numbers, like above, the 'wallet', and there was a simple password to access. Considering the repetitious nature of his posts, figure there was a pattern, and likely a few keywords, that were also passwords. Couldn't be too hard to copy the wallet numbers, and write a script to try some of the unique choice of words, common in the posts.


For traveling, one can buy and use 'hardware wallets'. These you carry with you, like real wallets. They contain a private and public key just like any wallet, but your private key is stored in the device itself. They look like a glorified USB stick or perhaps a bit like the old MP3 players.

All right, I'll jump in.

The tech world now provides key management services that allow people to swim in keys while keeping them organized, all in the cloud so you never need to carry them around with you. Of course one may maintain responsibility for one's keys via hardened encrypted cloud storage. Additionally, for those who are paranoid about anyone getting any of their keys, they may connect a server to the internet and hang a Hardware Security Module (HSM) off it which manages keys while providing the highest-level encryption.



Again, no one really walks around with crypto-keys. They are always stored a repository that can be accessed wherever needed.

The one (but common) exception to this is the user token, such as the DOD's CAC or the Federal government's PIV. These contain chips that carry asymmetric public and private keys (or certificates) along with a personal ID key, but these tokens are meant to enable encrypted email, document signing and network authentication.



.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-01-2021 04:38
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
IBdaMann wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was figuring it would be simple enough to remember, like logon passwords for websites. Be kind of tough to spend cryptocurrency, if you have to carry around, and type in a bunch of characters... I sort of thought the long stings, were like account numbers, like above, the 'wallet', and there was a simple password to access. Considering the repetitious nature of his posts, figure there was a pattern, and likely a few keywords, that were also passwords. Couldn't be too hard to copy the wallet numbers, and write a script to try some of the unique choice of words, common in the posts.


For traveling, one can buy and use 'hardware wallets'. These you carry with you, like real wallets. They contain a private and public key just like any wallet, but your private key is stored in the device itself. They look like a glorified USB stick or perhaps a bit like the old MP3 players.

All right, I'll jump in.

The tech world now provides key management services that allow people to swim in keys while keeping them organized, all in the cloud so you never need to carry them around with you. Of course one may maintain responsibility for one's keys via hardened encrypted cloud storage. Additionally, for those who are paranoid about anyone getting any of their keys, they may connect a server to the internet and hang a Hardware Security Module (HSM) off it which manages keys while providing the highest-level encryption.



Again, no one really walks around with crypto-keys. They are always stored a repository that can be accessed wherever needed.

The one (but common) exception to this is the user token, such as the DOD's CAC or the Federal government's PIV. These contain chips that carry asymmetric public and private keys (or certificates) along with a personal ID key, but these tokens are meant to enable encrypted email, document signing and network authentication.



.


There is the problem of the cloud itself.

Clouds are servers managed by someone else. Sure, you have nice encryption on clouds and encryption of the data path, but it IS on someone else's machine. The cloud can fail. Companies can go out of business, change what is available on the cloud (effectively rendering your old data unusable), etc. You have no control over that. What you DO get in AWS is great duplication of storage services and reliable up time for that storage. Storage is essentially 'holographic' on AWS, spreading duplicate bits across many servers and even server centers.

Microsoft's Azure is not nearly so good at it. It is Windows, after all.

Google Cloud sucks green tidewater. Very few services are available and they are extremely hard to use.

Of course, if you have your own private wallet on your computer or on a hardware device, YOU are responsible for it...utterly. Yes, it's as secure as you want to make it, but YOU are responsible for maintaining the keys.

So here we sit:

Currencies are used by morons that can't even balance their checkbook. Few people know or understand anything about cryptography. The safe use of Bitcoin requires more knowledge than most of the population has. After, most people have difficulty getting their browser to work reliably and rely on others to build their computers for them, repair them, and correct problems in the software on them.

This is the biggest reason Bitcoin and any other block chain currency isn't really going to make it in the end. All it's going to take is someone not properly storing their Coins, and someone else ripping them off or they lose their Coins because their storage was lost or made unusable for some reason.

Imagine, for example, if you had a wallet stored on Parler.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
27-01-2021 05:38
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3195)
Don't those cloud servers generate a lot of heat? Is it possible, for the climate change models running on the cloud servers, being effected by the heat generated by the servers, and being biased toward global warming. Maybe we could just shut down the cloud servers for 30 days, and see if that clears up the simulated warming trend.
27-01-2021 15:41
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Don't those cloud servers generate a lot of heat?

Yes. All those machines get quite warm. They are generally cooled by forced air and convection. Some are cooled with water systems, but generally it's mostly forced air cooling. That is used to heat either the building or the outside air.
HarveyH55 wrote:
Is it possible, for the climate change models running on the cloud servers, being effected by the heat generated by the servers, and being biased toward global warming.

Maybe we could just shut down the cloud servers for 30 days, and see if that clears up the simulated warming trend.

The word is 'affect', not 'effect' (an easy mistake).

In interesting idea! I like this line of thinking!



The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 27-01-2021 15:41
27-01-2021 18:55
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8625)
Into the Night wrote: The word is 'affect', not 'effect' (an easy mistake).

Remember, the servers are affected by the heat but the climate change models are effected by the servers.


I happen to be a fan of the word "effected," especially when I have already used the word "implemented" and I don't want to appear repetitive.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-01-2021 21:10
SwanProfile picture★★☆☆☆
(395)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place
28-01-2021 01:29
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 28-01-2021 01:31
28-01-2021 02:09
SwanProfile picture★★☆☆☆
(395)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes. Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point. I'll stick with Google and Apple.

After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors. Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now. It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme only they were open about what is being sold. LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own
28-01-2021 04:03
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(8625)
Into the Night wrote:
It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

You are, of course, completely correct. Currency is simply a statement of faith, in this case, faith in the value of the currency.

I'm sure you've heard the phrase "put your money where your mouth is." It is a call to demonstrate that you actually believe, or have full faith, in what you purport/preach/proclaim, i.e. prove that you are not being a hypocrite.

Well, acceptance of a currency is a demonstration of one's very real faith that he will be able, in turn, to purchase from others with that currency.

Swan is simply expressing his lack of faith in cryptocurrencies, which is fine; he is not required to hold any faith in any currency, but he cannot deny the very real faith that others have in cryptocurrencies.

The cryptographic security aspect of a cryptocurrency is meant to bolster/solidify faith in the currency and thus make it more competitive against other currencies, especially against fiat currencies in which faith is tied to a nebulous concept of a "country" as opposed to any confidence level in a specific technology.

People all over the world use the internet every day without giving it a second thought. People are inclined to believe that the technology they use every day works because they see it work every day. People all over the world are naturally distrustful of governments and lose faith regularly.

Faith in cryptocurrency is absolutely real, as you have stated. I'm not sure how that can be denied.


.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
28-01-2021 13:37
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes.

Why would it vanish?
Swan wrote:
Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point.

Yes it is.
Swan wrote:
I'll stick with Google and Apple.

If you want to. I figure you want to invest in censorship.
Swan wrote:
After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors.

Depends on the outcome of lawsuits and customers leaving Apple and Google.
Swan wrote:
Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now.

Yes there is.
Swan wrote:
It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme

Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
only they were open about what is being sold.

They have a value, determined by market price, just like any other commodity or stock.
Swan wrote:
LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own

Bitcoins are not shares.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
28-01-2021 15:51
SwanProfile picture★★☆☆☆
(395)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes.

Why would it vanish?
Swan wrote:
Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point.

Yes it is.
Swan wrote:
I'll stick with Google and Apple.

If you want to. I figure you want to invest in censorship.
Swan wrote:
After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors.

Depends on the outcome of lawsuits and customers leaving Apple and Google.
Swan wrote:
Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now.

Yes there is.
Swan wrote:
It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme

Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
only they were open about what is being sold.

They have a value, determined by market price, just like any other commodity or stock.
Swan wrote:
LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own

Bitcoins are not shares.


Bitcoins have no practical value. However since I am wrong can you tell me what one bitcoin is worth? Have you ever held one? Do you know anyone who has ever held one?

Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme, it is legal because the schemers are not hiding anything. Just like a pet rock, people bought them who could not have dogs and cats, it was literally just a rock in a box with a pedigree saying that it was a pet rock. The owner made millions off of literally nothing, just like bitcoin

There are only 21 million bitcoins that can be mined in total. Once bitcoin miners have unlocked all the bitcoins, the planet's supply will essentially be tapped out. Currently, around 18.5 million bitcoin have been mined; this leaves less than three million that have yet to be introduced into circulation.

What happens to your stock when you do not actually own a bitcoin and everyone sells because there is not actually anything there?

You lose
Edited on 28-01-2021 15:55
29-01-2021 00:32
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes.

Why would it vanish?
Swan wrote:
Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point.

Yes it is.
Swan wrote:
I'll stick with Google and Apple.

If you want to. I figure you want to invest in censorship.
Swan wrote:
After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors.

Depends on the outcome of lawsuits and customers leaving Apple and Google.
Swan wrote:
Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now.

Yes there is.
Swan wrote:
It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme

Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
only they were open about what is being sold.

They have a value, determined by market price, just like any other commodity or stock.
Swan wrote:
LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own

Bitcoins are not shares.


Bitcoins have no practical value.

Sure they do. There can only so many of them. People can't print them like the government prints all the dollars it wants to. Governments have no control over bitcoin.

You can currently buy hotel rooms and even food in Las Vegas with Bitcoin. You can buy clothing,, cars, pizza, hamburgers, aircraft, TVs, furniture, video game consoles and games, website hosting, computer equipment, and even gold and silver. You can also convert it to most any fiat currency in the world, just like you can with gold.
Swan wrote:
However since I am wrong can you tell me what one bitcoin is worth?

One bitcoin is currently worth $32855.10, as of 21.1.28.r.0648Z.
One oz of gold is currently worth $1842.40 as of 21.1.28.r.0651Z.
That's currently about 17.8 the price of gold.

Bitcoins are easily subdivided into millcoins and microcoins (or any other fraction) for practical use.
Swan wrote:
Have you ever held one?

Not an entire coin. The most bitcoin I have ever held is one centibitcoin. Hardware wallets are common. You can walk around with any amount of bitcoin that fits easily in your pocket.
Swan wrote:
Do you know anyone who has ever held one?

Sure. I know about a dozen people who have held one, personally.
Swan wrote:
Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme,

Nope. No pyramid. No ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
it is legal because the schemers are not hiding anything.

No ponzi scheme is legal except government sponsored ones, like the Social Security system.
Swan wrote:
Just like a pet rock,

I remember those! I usually went out and captured and tamed wild rocks rather than buy one.
Swan wrote:
people bought them who could not have dogs and cats, it was literally just a rock in a box with a pedigree saying that it was a pet rock.

Well, people really have no idea how easy it is to train a wild rock.
Swan wrote:
The owner made millions off of literally nothing, just like bitcoin

Rocks exist. So does bitcoin. There is no owner of bitcoin. The originators of the block chain do own some bitcoin of course, but no one owns the block chain.
Swan wrote:
There are only 21 million bitcoins that can be mined in total. Once bitcoin miners have unlocked all the bitcoins, the planet's supply will essentially be tapped out.

This is actually why Bitcoin has value. People can't just print 'em like the government prints all the dollars it wants. Bitcoins are easily subdivided, making them ideal for transactions of any size with a single currency.
Swan wrote:
Currently, around 18.5 million bitcoin have been mined; this leaves less than three million that have yet to be introduced into circulation.

That's about right. Mining bitcoins is a LOT of intensive CPU time. Better CPUs make it a bit easier, but GPUs are better suited to the task. Even then, a new bitcoin introduced into the block chain is not very common, since it's so difficult to produce a bitcoin.
Swan wrote:
What happens to your stock when you do not actually own a bitcoin and everyone sells because there is not actually anything there?

Nothing. I have still have the bitcoin I purchased. Why would everyone sell them off?
Swan wrote:
You lose


Nah. If you invest in fiat currency, you lose. Governments can print all the money they want any time they want. As money is printed with no corresponding wealth increase in society, it becomes worth less and less, until it's no longer practical to use them as currency.

This happened to the Mark after WW1 and before WW2, it's also happened to the Peso in Mexico (they use a New Peso now, worth 1000 times what the Old Peso is worth). Currently, the Old Peso is worth 49 micro dollars. The New Peso is currently worth 4.9 cents (Mexican Peso <-> USD as of 21.1.28.r.0749Z).

The Japanese Yen is currently worth 0.96 cents. (Yen<->USD as of 21.1.28.r.0722Z). It has effectively collapsed. It won't be long before the government of Japan will have to reset it with a New Yen AGAIN. Oh, and Bitcoin is popular in Japan (for a reason).

Fiat currencies are losing value all over the world. Things cost more in these currencies because of it. That's called inflation.

Bitcoin is attractive to more and more people, precisely because fiat currencies around the world are in a race to the bottom. What happened to Mexico can happen here. What happened to Japan can happen here. What happened to Brazil can happen here. What happened in Weimar Germany can happen here.

It can't happen to Bitcoin. No one can just print them. Like gold, there is a limited supply.


Now, having said all that, there IS a downside to Bitcoin, and that is this:

Wallets (what Bitcoins are stored in) are made up of pairs of crypto keys, using the public/private key encryption system. One key is published (this becomes your 'storefront' for people to pay you in Bitcoin) and the other is private. The block chain is also encrypted, but the other way. This effectively forms a double pair public/private key encryption systems, capable of guaranteeing who the sender is, AND who the recipient is. ONLY the sender could've originated the transaction. ONLY the recipient can receive the transaction.

The block chain itself maintains the list of all transactions, and thus where all the Bitcoins and fractions of them are.

There are two problems. The first is losing your private key. This is effectively like forgetting where you stored your gold (I buried it SOMEWHERE around here!). The Coins are lost. You cannot recover them. They are still valuable, but ONLY if you can recover them.

The other is the block chain itself. Since it keeps a list of all transactions in encrypted form, this block chain gets longer and longer. Passing this thing around in its entirety is getting slower and slower. Fortunately, there IS a solution to this, since this sort of thing has happened before, with Internet IP addresses.

Originally, people kept the entire list of IP addresses and names on each computer (usually in a file called /etc/hosts). As new IP's came on line, this larger and larger file had to be downloaded to keep up. It soon became impractical to maintain a list of IP's and names this way.

Today, this database is stored across multiple machines in a master bindery using a protocol called DNS (Domain Name Service). Now, only a few copies of all IP's and Names need be maintained. Other systems obtain the portion they are interested in. You no longer need to load the whole thing into your computer. Just the tiny bit of it that you actually use. This is slower per transaction, but much faster overall. You don't need to load the whole Hosts file.

The same thing could conceivably be applied to a block chain. A few master copies, and people only load the bits that they are interested in to conduct a transaction. This is slower per transaction, but you don't need to load the entire block chain anymore and the slightly slower transaction speed doesn't increase with block chain size.

The Bitcoin block chain is currently getting rather large. Transactions are getting slower and slower as a result. Putting this thing into a distributed database similar to the bindery would speed up overall transaction speed by an order of magnitude.

So the downsides can be dealt with.

Don't ever lose your private key (password) to your wallet. There is no one to get it back from.

Distributed databases can handle the block chain itself as it grows in length.

All in all, Bitcoin has value. You can conduct transactions with it to buy most anything you want. You can freely convert it to most any fiat currency you want anywhere in the world and back again. Governments have no power over it. You can put a Wallet in your pocket and take bitcoin anywhere you want to travel. Just don't lose your private key.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 29-01-2021 00:57
29-01-2021 00:42
SwanProfile picture★★☆☆☆
(395)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes.

Why would it vanish?
Swan wrote:
Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point.

Yes it is.
Swan wrote:
I'll stick with Google and Apple.

If you want to. I figure you want to invest in censorship.
Swan wrote:
After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors.

Depends on the outcome of lawsuits and customers leaving Apple and Google.
Swan wrote:
Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now.

Yes there is.
Swan wrote:
It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme

Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
only they were open about what is being sold.

They have a value, determined by market price, just like any other commodity or stock.
Swan wrote:
LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own

Bitcoins are not shares.


Bitcoins have no practical value.

Sure they do. There can only so many of them. People can't print them like the government prints all the dollars it wants to. Governments have no control over bitcoin.

You can currently buy hotel rooms and even food in Las Vegas with Bitcoin. You can buy clothing,, cars, pizza, hamburgers, aircraft, TVs, furniture, video game consoles and games, website hosting, computer equipment, and even gold and silver. You can also convert it to most any fiat currency in the world, just like you can with gold.
Swan wrote:
However since I am wrong can you tell me what one bitcoin is worth?

One bitcoin is currently worth $32855.10, as of 21.1.28.r.0648Z.
One oz of gold is currently worth $1842.40 as of 21.1.28.r.0651Z.
That's currently about 17.8 the price of gold.

Bitcoins are easily subdivided into millcoins and microcoins (or any other fraction) for practical use.
Swan wrote:
Have you ever held one?

Not an entire coin. The most bitcoin I have ever held is one centibitcoin. Hardware wallets are common. You can walk around with any amount of bitcoin that fits easily in your pocket.
Swan wrote:
Do you know anyone who has ever held one?

Sure. I know about a dozen people who have held one, personally.
Swan wrote:
Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme,

Nope. No pyramid. No ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
it is legal because the schemers are not hiding anything.

No ponzi scheme is legal except government sponsored ones, like the Social Security system.
Swan wrote:
Just like a pet rock,

I remember those! I usually went out and captured and tamed wild rocks rather than buy one.
Swan wrote:
people bought them who could not have dogs and cats, it was literally just a rock in a box with a pedigree saying that it was a pet rock.

Well, people really have no idea how easy it is to train a wild rock.
Swan wrote:
The owner made millions off of literally nothing, just like bitcoin

Rocks exist. So does bitcoin. There is no owner of bitcoin. The originators of the block chain do own some bitcoin of course, but no one owns the block chain.
Swan wrote:
There are only 21 million bitcoins that can be mined in total. Once bitcoin miners have unlocked all the bitcoins, the planet's supply will essentially be tapped out.

This is actually why Bitcoin has value. People can't just print 'em like the government prints all the dollars it wants. Bitcoins are easily subdivided, making them ideal for transactions of any size with a single currency.
Swan wrote:
Currently, around 18.5 million bitcoin have been mined; this leaves less than three million that have yet to be introduced into circulation.

That's about right. Mining bitcoins is a LOT of intensive CPU time. Better CPUs make it a bit easier, but GPUs are better suited to the task. Even then, a new bitcoin introduced into the block chain is not very common, since it's so difficult to produce a bitcoin.
Swan wrote:
What happens to your stock when you do not actually own a bitcoin and everyone sells because there is not actually anything there?

Nothing. I have still have the bitcoin I purchased. Why would everyone sell them off?
Swan wrote:
You lose


Nah. If you invest in fiat currency, you lose. Governments can print all the money they want any time they want. As money is printed with no corresponding wealth increase in society, it becomes worth less and less, until it's no longer practical to use them as currency.

This happened to the Mark after WW1 and before WW2, it's also happened to the Peso in Mexico (they use a New Peso now, worth 1000 times what the Old Peso is worth). Currently, the Old Peso is worth 49 micro dollars. The New Peso is currently worth 4.9 cents (Mexican Peso <-> USD as of 21.1.28.r.0749Z).

The Japanese Yen is currently worth 0.96 cents. (Yen<->USD as of 21.1.28.r.0722Z). It has effectively collapsed. It won't be long before the government of Japan will have to reset it with a New Yen AGAIN. Oh, and Bitcoin is popular in Japan (for a reason).

Fiat currencies are losing value all over the world. Things cost more in these currencies because of it. That's called inflation.

Bitcoin is attractive to more and more people, precisely because fiat currencies around the world are in a race to the bottom. What happened to Mexico can happen here. What happened to Japan can happen here. What happened to Brazil can happen here. What happened in Weimar Germany can happen here.

It can't happen to Bitcoin. No one can just print them. Like gold, there is a limited supply.


Says the guy who owns 1/50,000 of one bitcoin, with a real value of about a cup of beach sand

Apple will still make phones after the next crash, the first people to get out of bitcoin will do fine. The rest will have nothing
29-01-2021 01:01
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15054)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
If someone guesses the password to a crypto wallet, do they own the contents? Is it a crime, or good fortune? Unfortunately, I wouldn't know how to submit guesses, or what to do, if successful...


Good luck with that! The 'password' is actually a long private key. You lose that and you're ****ed.

It would be easier to mine a new Coin than to try to recover that private key.


Cryptocurrency will vanish in the next true meltdown. Why? Because it is not truly real in the first place


It is completely real. In the truest sense. Proof by identity.
You can buy and sell it today. You can conduct transactions in it today.

Sure, it's just bits in a computer, but so are dollars, yen, pesos, and most other currencies. The paper money people carry around is a small part of the currency.

Maybe you need to define what 'real' means. This is defined by philosophy, in a branch of philosophy known as phenomenology.

In philosophy, you must provide your own argument. You cannot use the arguments of others as your own argument.

So let's hear your definition of 'real'.


LOL you can buy and sell bitcoin until it vanishes.

Why would it vanish?
Swan wrote:
Do you know how many bitcoins that you get in a share of stock? LOL it's not even calculable at this point.

Yes it is.
Swan wrote:
I'll stick with Google and Apple.

If you want to. I figure you want to invest in censorship.
Swan wrote:
After the crash Apple might lose over half it's value, which will make it more valuable to investors.

Depends on the outcome of lawsuits and customers leaving Apple and Google.
Swan wrote:
Once the top coin investors sell there will literally be nothing there, but there is nothing there now.

Yes there is.
Swan wrote:
It's like the Madoff Ponzi scheme

Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
only they were open about what is being sold.

They have a value, determined by market price, just like any other commodity or stock.
Swan wrote:
LOL divide 21 million bitcoin by every share to see how many thousanths of one bitcoin that you actually own

Bitcoins are not shares.


Bitcoins have no practical value.

Sure they do. There can only so many of them. People can't print them like the government prints all the dollars it wants to. Governments have no control over bitcoin.

You can currently buy hotel rooms and even food in Las Vegas with Bitcoin. You can buy clothing,, cars, pizza, hamburgers, aircraft, TVs, furniture, video game consoles and games, website hosting, computer equipment, and even gold and silver. You can also convert it to most any fiat currency in the world, just like you can with gold.
Swan wrote:
However since I am wrong can you tell me what one bitcoin is worth?

One bitcoin is currently worth $32855.10, as of 21.1.28.r.0648Z.
One oz of gold is currently worth $1842.40 as of 21.1.28.r.0651Z.
That's currently about 17.8 the price of gold.

Bitcoins are easily subdivided into millcoins and microcoins (or any other fraction) for practical use.
Swan wrote:
Have you ever held one?

Not an entire coin. The most bitcoin I have ever held is one centibitcoin. Hardware wallets are common. You can walk around with any amount of bitcoin that fits easily in your pocket.
Swan wrote:
Do you know anyone who has ever held one?

Sure. I know about a dozen people who have held one, personally.
Swan wrote:
Bitcoin is a ponzi scheme,

Nope. No pyramid. No ponzi scheme.
Swan wrote:
it is legal because the schemers are not hiding anything.

No ponzi scheme is legal except government sponsored ones, like the Social Security system.
Swan wrote:
Just like a pet rock,

I remember those! I usually went out and captured and tamed wild rocks rather than buy one.
Swan wrote:
people bought them who could not have dogs and cats, it was literally just a rock in a box with a pedigree saying that it was a pet rock.

Well, people really have no idea how easy it is to train a wild rock.
Swan wrote:
The owner made millions off of literally nothing, just like bitcoin

Rocks exist. So does bitcoin. There is no owner of bitcoin. The originators of the block chain do own some bitcoin of course, but no one owns the block chain.
Swan wrote:
There are only 21 million bitcoins that can be mined in total. Once bitcoin miners have unlocked all the bitcoins, the planet's supply will essentially be tapped out.

This is actually why Bitcoin has value. People can't just print 'em like the government prints all the dollars it wants. Bitcoins are easily subdivided, making them ideal for transactions of any size with a single currency.
Swan wrote:
Currently, around 18.5 million bitcoin have been mined; this leaves less than three million that have yet to be introduced into circulation.

That's about right. Mining bitcoins is a LOT of intensive CPU time. Better CPUs make it a bit easier, but GPUs are better suited to the task. Even then, a new bitcoin introduced into the block chain is not very common, since it's so difficult to produce a bitcoin.
Swan wrote:
What happens to your stock when you do not actually own a bitcoin and everyone sells because there is not actually anything there?

Nothing. I have still have the bitcoin I purchased. Why would everyone sell them off?
Swan wrote:
You lose


Nah. If you invest in fiat currency, you lose. Governments can print all the money they want any time they want. As money is printed with no corresponding wealth increase in society, it becomes worth less and less, until it's no longer practical to use them as currency.

This happened to the Mark after WW1 and before WW2, it's also happened to the Peso in Mexico (they use a New Peso now, worth 1000 times what the Old Peso is worth). Currently, the Old Peso is worth 49 micro dollars. The New Peso is currently worth 4.9 cents (Mexican Peso <-> USD as of 21.1.28.r.0749Z).

The Japanese Yen is currently worth 0.96 cents. (Yen<->USD as of 21.1.28.r.0722Z). It has effectively collapsed. It won't be long before the government of Japan will have to reset it with a New Yen AGAIN. Oh, and Bitcoin is popular in Japan (for a reason).

Fiat currencies are losing value all over the world. Things cost more in these currencies because of it. That's called inflation.

Bitcoin is attractive to more and more people, precisely because fiat currencies around the world are in a race to the bottom. What happened to Mexico can happen here. What happened to Japan can happen here. What happened to Brazil can happen here. What happened in Weimar Germany can happen here.

It can't happen to Bitcoin. No one can just print them. Like gold, there is a limited supply.


Says the guy who owns 1/50,000 of one bitcoin, with a real value of about a cup of beach sand

Apple will still make phones after the next crash, the first people to get out of bitcoin will do fine. The rest will have nothing

I currently do not own any Bitcoin. I prefer to store my wealth in gold and real estate.

1/50,000 of a bitcoin is worth 65 cents today. Yes, you can buy beach sand with bitcoin. You can buy the whole beach with bitcoin! Yes...you can buy real estate with bitcoin.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
RE: Investing29-01-2021 23:11
Jessica
☆☆☆☆☆
(2)
The best way is really to invest in green tech companies.
There was this funding page i found online. If you are serious you can donate a couple of dollars.

https://www.gofundme.com/f/zhhq4-green-technology?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1
29-01-2021 23:51
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★☆
(1869)
Jessica wrote:
The best way is really to invest in green tech companies.
There was this funding page i found online. If you are serious you can donate a couple of dollars.

https://www.gofundme.com/f/zhhq4-green-technology?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1

No.




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