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Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for


Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for quant17-12-2023 17:24
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
17-12-2023 22:54
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the **** of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

All aboard the crazy train?


RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for17-12-2023 22:54
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train.



Edited on 17-12-2023 23:14
18-12-2023 02:29
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train.


Says the looney tune who claims that the Earth is a terrarium


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for18-12-2023 03:38
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
https://youtu.be/LD2lFLyjGAY?si=4hcj84CcRU1QkVR0



Edited on 18-12-2023 03:38
18-12-2023 03:59
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:

Says the looney tune who claims that the Earth is a terrarium


Behold The Golden Looney




18-12-2023 03:59
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:

Says the looney tune who claims that the Earth is a terrarium


Behold The Golden Looney




18-12-2023 10:36
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:

Says the looney tune who claims that the Earth is a terrarium


Behold The Golden Looney



Whatever you say Daffy



IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for20-12-2023 04:33
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train


Most people think the Sun is greater than the Moon. But this is not correct.

The moon produces gamma radiation.

The sun produces ultraviolet radiation.

Gamma is greater than ultraviolet radiation.

Still, you can't grow tomatoes with moon light.

And rumor says, it makes you go blind.



Edited on 20-12-2023 04:54
RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for20-12-2023 04:33
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Removing double post



Edited on 20-12-2023 04:35
RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for20-12-2023 07:39
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train


Most people think the Sun is greater than the Moon. But this is not correct.

The moon produces gamma radiation.

The sun produces ultraviolet radiation.

Gamma is greater than ultraviolet radiation.

Still, you can't grow tomatoes with moon light.

And rumor says, it makes you go blind.


Oh I remembered some evidence I have of these real world optical tweezers.

I took the following picture on Halloween night, 2019, when there were lots of adults and children walking on the city sidewalks.

There must have been some kind of glitch, cuz the camera pretty much just picked up on these real world optical tweezers.

They look like winding power lines, hooked into people, running up the sky.

You can tell which power lines are sun light. They are red (well more like orange). These lines are hooked into children.

You can tell which power lines are moon light. They are white. These lines are hooked into adults.

Are You Hungred or Hungwhite?





Edited on 20-12-2023 07:52
20-12-2023 14:00
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train


Most people think the Sun is greater than the Moon. But this is not correct.

The moon produces gamma radiation.

The sun produces ultraviolet radiation.

Gamma is greater than ultraviolet radiation.

Still, you can't grow tomatoes with moon light.

And rumor says, it makes you go blind.


Most people do not have detailed conversations with themselves like you just did


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
20-12-2023 14:04
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
https://www.princeton.edu/news/2023/12/08/physicists-entangle-individual-molecules-first-time-hastening-possibilities-quantum

In a noteworthy first, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically "entangled." In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other — and can interact simultaneously — even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the current issue of the journal Science.

"This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement," said Lawrence Cheuk, an assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, the senior author of the paper and a graduate of Princeton's Class of 2010. "But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications."

These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.

"One of the motivations in doing quantum science is that in the practical world it turns out that if you harness the laws of quantum mechanics, you can do a lot better in many areas," said Connor Holland, a graduate student in the physics department and a co-author on the work.

The ability of quantum devices to outperform classical ones is known as "quantum advantage." And at the core of quantum advantage are the principles of superposition and quantum entanglement. While a classical computer bit can assume the value of either 0 or 1, quantum bits, called qubits, can simultaneously be in a superposition of 0 and 1.

The latter concept, entanglement, is a major cornerstone of quantum mechanics. It occurs when two particles become inextricably linked with each other so that this link persists, even if one particle is light-years away from the other particle. It is the phenomenon that Albert Einstein, who at first questioned its validity, described as "spooky action at a distance." Since then, physicists have demonstrated that entanglement is, in fact, an accurate description of the physical world and how reality is structured.

"Quantum entanglement is a fundamental concept," said Cheuk, "but it is also the key ingredient that bestows quantum advantage."

But building quantum advantage and achieving controllable quantum entanglement remain a challenge, not least because engineers and scientists are still unclear about which physical platform is best for creating qubits. In the past decades, many different technologies — such as trapped ions, photons, superconducting circuits, to name only a few — have been explored as candidates for quantum computers and devices. The optimal quantum system or qubit platform could very well depend on the specific application.

Until this experiment, however, molecules had long defied controllable quantum entanglement. But Cheuk and his colleagues found a way, through careful manipulation in the laboratory, to control individual molecules and coax them into these interlocking quantum states. They also believed that molecules have certain advantages — over atoms, for example — that made them especially well-suited for certain applications in quantum information processing and quantum simulation of complex materials. Compared to atoms, for example, molecules have more quantum degrees of freedom and can interact in new ways.

"What this means, in practical terms, is that there are new ways of storing and processing quantum information," said Yukai Lu, a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering and a co-author of the paper. "For example, a molecule can vibrate and rotate in multiple modes. So, you can use two of these modes to encode a qubit. If the molecular species is polar, two molecules can interact even when spatially separated."

Nonetheless, molecules have proven notoriously difficult to control in the laboratory because of their complexity. The very degrees of freedom that make them attractive also make them hard to control, or corral, in laboratory settings. Cheuk and his team addressed many of these challenges through a carefully thought-out experiment involving a sophisticated experimental platform known as a "tweezer array," in which individual molecules were picked up by a complex system of tightly focused laser beams, so-called "optical tweezers."

"Using molecules for quantum science is a new frontier and our demonstration of on-demand entanglement is a key step in demonstrating that molecules can be used as a viable platform for quantum science," said Cheuk.

In a separate article published in the same issue of Science, an independent research group led by John Doyle and Kang-Kuen Ni at Harvard University and Wolfgang Ketterle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology achieved similar results.

"The fact that they got the same results verify the reliability of our results," Cheuk said. "They also show that molecular tweezer arrays are becoming an exciting new platform for quantum science."

"On-Demand Entanglement of Molecules in a Reconfigurable Optical Tweezer Array," by Connor M. Holland, Yukai Lu, and Lawrence W. Cheuk was published in Science on December 8, 2023, (DOI: 10.1126/science.adf4272). The work was supported by Princeton University, the National Science Foundation (2207518) and the Sloan Foundation (FG-2022-19104).


Oh I have an idea for qubit platforms...

Parasites can hold hold the qubits, infect through the genitals of every Jackass, feed energy through Moon beams, and power Hell.

AND

Bacteria can hold the qubits, pass through the a$$hole of every aboriginal, feed energy through Sun beams, and power Heaven.

Lunatics aboard the crazy train


Most people think the Sun is greater than the Moon. But this is not correct.

The moon produces gamma radiation.

The sun produces ultraviolet radiation.

Gamma is greater than ultraviolet radiation.

Still, you can't grow tomatoes with moon light.

And rumor says, it makes you go blind.


Oh I remembered some evidence I have of these real world optical tweezers.

I took the following picture on Halloween night, 2019, when there were lots of adults and children walking on the city sidewalks.

There must have been some kind of glitch, cuz the camera pretty much just picked up on these real world optical tweezers.

They look like winding power lines, hooked into people, running up the sky.

You can tell which power lines are sun light. They are red (well more like orange). These lines are hooked into children.

You can tell which power lines are moon light. They are white. These lines are hooked into adults.

Are You Hungred or Hungwhite?



Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
21-12-2023 01:16
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:

Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


I don't have the answer to your question. And I'm not sure what you mean.

But you started this thread, and I responded with my talking points on this subject in a series of posts.

I can't think of anymore talking points on this subject at the moment.


21-12-2023 03:21
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:

Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


I don't have the answer to your question. And I'm not sure what you mean.

But you started this thread, and I responded with my talking points on this subject in a series of posts.

I can't think of anymore talking points on this subject at the moment.


Well at least you know that you can't think, that's a start.

130


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
21-12-2023 06:06
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Swan wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:

Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


I don't have the answer to your question. And I'm not sure what you mean.

But you started this thread, and I responded with my talking points on this subject in a series of posts.

I can't think of anymore talking points on this subject at the moment.


Well at least you know that you can't think, that's a start.

130


I think you are talking gibberish.

618


RE: Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for21-12-2023 06:57
Spongy IrisProfile picture★★★★☆
(1643)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:

Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


I don't have the answer to your question. And I'm not sure what you mean.

But you started this thread, and I responded with my talking points on this subject in a series of posts.

I can't think of anymore talking points on this subject at the moment.


Well at least you know that you can't think, that's a start.

130


I think you are talking gibberish.

618


Sigh.... I find gibberish worse than word games!

Are you talking to me, or are you talking about YOU?

No not you... YOU!

You know what I am talking about? LOL

YOU are the Hell's angels of the moon light.

Here I spotted a picture. It says: LIFT UP. I'M YOU.



Lift up means cause an erection.

This pic kept popping up when I opened a new tab, and my most visited websites were displayed. I saved it around 2015. I didn't make a note of the date.

Why do they call them selfs YOU?

Maybe some psycho kind of reason that has to do with being alter ego...



Edited on 21-12-2023 06:58
21-12-2023 13:02
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(5740)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Swan wrote:

Seriously, if no one stopped you, how long would you talk to yourself and would you invent new friends to say hello to?

Well we actually have the answer to that now


I don't have the answer to your question. And I'm not sure what you mean.

But you started this thread, and I responded with my talking points on this subject in a series of posts.

I can't think of anymore talking points on this subject at the moment.


Well at least you know that you can't think, that's a start.

130


I think you are talking gibberish.

618


I know that your belief that the Earth is encased in glass is gibberish. So, think less and know more.

130


IBdaMann claims that Gold is a molecule, and that the last ice age never happened because I was not there to see it. The only conclusion that can be drawn from this is that IBdaMann is clearly not using enough LSD.

According to CDC/Government info, people who were vaccinated are now DYING at a higher rate than non-vaccinated people, which exposes the covid vaccines as the poison that they are, this is now fully confirmed by the terrorist CDC

This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

"Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat." MOTHER THERESA OF CALCUTTA

So why is helping to hide the murder of an American president patriotic?


It's time to dig up Joseph Mccarthey and show him TikTok, then duck.


Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL




Join the debate Physicists 'entangle' individual molecules for the first time, bringing about a new platform for :

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