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Will Warm Winters Balance Out The Effects Of Greenhouse Gases?


Will Warm Winters Balance Out The Effects Of Greenhouse Gases?21-12-2015 20:58
thenerdyone314
☆☆☆☆☆
(2)
Disclaimer: I do not study anything on this topic. This is just a theory I developed based on a limited knowledge.

It seems to me that these warm winters may actually be a self defense system being deployed by our beloved planet in order to try and balance out the massive amount of greenhouse gases that we are pumping into the atmosphere. It is believed that the warm temperatures are due to the ozone layer being destroyed and more UV light reaching the Earth's surface, or something along those lines, but maybe there is another reason for the increase in temperatures.

Think about it, with an increase in temperatures, there will be less snow/ice. Less snow/ice will result in more plants being open to the sun and air. By the wonderful process of photosynthesis and the exchange of gases that plants need to survive, more CO2 will be eaten up by the plants that are now active during times that they normally wouldn't be. This would lead to lower greenhouse gas levels than what there would be if these plants were covered in snow and not eating up the harmful gases.

I don't believe that this will be the sole cure for climate change, because I don't think that this self defense mechanism is large enough to counter-balance the insane amount of gases that humans pump into the air every year, but I do believe that it will help some and that if humans took more of an effort to help reduce the greenhouse gas output, that the Earth would be capable of balancing itself out by changing temperatures and dictating how much CO2 the plants are able to eat up each year.
21-12-2015 21:05
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1081)
The greenhouse effect tends to moderate. That's why the Earth has cool days and warm nights whereas the Moon, which has no greenhouse effect, has boiling days and freezing nights. The greenhouse effect makes summers cool, winters warm, days cool, nights warm, and it has a greater effect towards the poles and very little effect towards the equator.
Edited on 21-12-2015 21:06
21-12-2015 21:08
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1081)
But you know, CO2 is a trace gas, only 0.04% of the atmosphere. Methane is measured in parts per billion and it changed by a far larger percentage than CO2 has. Ye, humans changed CO2 by 40 something %, but CO2 is a trace gas. As a trace gas, CO2 is not important.
Edited on 21-12-2015 21:11
21-12-2015 21:21
thenerdyone314
☆☆☆☆☆
(2)
Based on the information you provided, would you then say that killing the rainforests and such is not a factor of the global warming?
21-12-2015 21:55
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(11793)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
The greenhouse effect tends to moderate. That's why the Earth has cool days and warm nights whereas the Moon, which has no greenhouse effect, has boiling days and freezing nights. The greenhouse effect makes summers cool, winters warm, days cool, nights warm, and it has a greater effect towards the poles and very little effect towards the equator.


Interesting statement. Why would the moderative effect of an atmosphere have a greater effect towards the poles? Or are you just attributing this to 'greenhouse' gases?


The Parrot Killer
21-12-2015 21:58
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1081)
Into the Night wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
The greenhouse effect tends to moderate. That's why the Earth has cool days and warm nights whereas the Moon, which has no greenhouse effect, has boiling days and freezing nights. The greenhouse effect makes summers cool, winters warm, days cool, nights warm, and it has a greater effect towards the poles and very little effect towards the equator.


Interesting statement. Why would the moderative effect of an atmosphere have a greater effect towards the poles? Or are you just attributing this to 'greenhouse' gases?


That is beyond my expertise. During the Little Ice Age, for example, the equator experienced essentially no cooling while Europe and North America for example, were greatly affected. I think because there is thicker atmosphere towards the poles and thinner atmosphere towards the equator, that's why the greenhouse effect has more effect towards the poles and less effect towards the equator.
21-12-2015 23:08
still learning
★★☆☆☆
(244)
[quote]Tai Hai Chen wrote:

I think because there is thicker atmosphere towards the poles and thinner atmosphere towards the equator/quote]

Thicker-thinner atmosphere as one moves from the pole to the equator? Bizarre notion. Where did you get it?
21-12-2015 23:15
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1081)
still learning wrote:
[quote]Tai Hai Chen wrote:

I think because there is thicker atmosphere towards the poles and thinner atmosphere towards the equator/quote]

Thicker-thinner atmosphere as one moves from the pole to the equator? Bizarre notion. Where did you get it?



This is because of the shape of the world.
22-12-2015 01:25
still learning
★★☆☆☆
(244)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:

This is because of the shape of the world.


Bizarre.

How do you mean "because of the shape of the world?"
Air pressure is a result of gravity acting on the mass of air, a result of the weight of the air.
See http://nova.stanford.edu/projects/mod-x/id-pres.html
Gravity is about 0.5% less at the equator compared to the poles, so I guess about the same air pressure difference.
See http://geophysics.ou.edu/solid_earth/notes/potential/igf.htm
22-12-2015 04:12
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(11793)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
The greenhouse effect tends to moderate. That's why the Earth has cool days and warm nights whereas the Moon, which has no greenhouse effect, has boiling days and freezing nights. The greenhouse effect makes summers cool, winters warm, days cool, nights warm, and it has a greater effect towards the poles and very little effect towards the equator.


Interesting statement. Why would the moderative effect of an atmosphere have a greater effect towards the poles? Or are you just attributing this to 'greenhouse' gases?


That is beyond my expertise. During the Little Ice Age, for example, the equator experienced essentially no cooling while Europe and North America for example, were greatly affected. I think because there is thicker atmosphere towards the poles and thinner atmosphere towards the equator, that's why the greenhouse effect has more effect towards the poles and less effect towards the equator.


I would agree. It's beyond your expertise. So is the Milankovich cycle, which would produce the same effects.

Current conditions at Nome, AK is showing a pressure of 29.39 inches, overcast but no precipitation.
Current conditions at Monteria, Colombia is showing a pressure of 29.72 inches, partly cloudy and no precipitation.

Doesn't seem to be much difference to me in air pressure. If anything, the equator is showing higher pressure.


The Parrot Killer
22-12-2015 12:35
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1318)
thenerdyone314 wrote:
Disclaimer: I do not study anything on this topic. This is just a theory I developed based on a limited knowledge.

It seems to me that these warm winters may actually be a self defense system being deployed by our beloved planet in order to try and balance out the massive amount of greenhouse gases that we are pumping into the atmosphere. It is believed that the warm temperatures are due to the ozone layer being destroyed and more UV light reaching the Earth's surface, or something along those lines, but maybe there is another reason for the increase in temperatures.

Think about it, with an increase in temperatures, there will be less snow/ice. Less snow/ice will result in more plants being open to the sun and air. By the wonderful process of photosynthesis and the exchange of gases that plants need to survive, more CO2 will be eaten up by the plants that are now active during times that they normally wouldn't be. This would lead to lower greenhouse gas levels than what there would be if these plants were covered in snow and not eating up the harmful gases.

I don't believe that this will be the sole cure for climate change, because I don't think that this self defense mechanism is large enough to counter-balance the insane amount of gases that humans pump into the air every year, but I do believe that it will help some and that if humans took more of an effort to help reduce the greenhouse gas output, that the Earth would be capable of balancing itself out by changing temperatures and dictating how much CO2 the plants are able to eat up each year.


1, Cut the mysticism. This is a science type area of debate.

2, The warming we have seen so far is indeed mostly the warming of night time temperatures and winter minimums. The hype about over heating is bogus.

3, Yes the more CO2 there is the more life will eat it and sequestrate it in the for of limestone deposited on the sea floor.

4, This will continue after we have moved onto better technologies to make electricity. These new technologies will be happening in the next few decades and will mean that we stop digging up coal or pumping up oil. Just as soon as they are cheaper than the fossil fuels they will replace.
10-02-2020 00:42
CzarnyZajaczek
☆☆☆☆☆
(23)
First, if you believe that global warming is caused by more UV due to reduced ozone layer and not CO2, it is weird that you propose that plants assimilating more CO2 would reduce this warming...

Second, there is decreasing insolation towards poles during winter, photosynthesis on high latitudes during winter will be insignificant. This effect you've described is most prominent in temperatures range of glaciacions rather than current temperature ranges. Also starting from current climate, further warming will likely cause large deforestation on equatorial regions, so it is more likely to be exactly opposite effect...
10-02-2020 01:36
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1775)
CzarnyZajaczek wrote:
First, if you believe that global warming is caused by more UV due to reduced ozone layer and not CO2, it is weird that you propose that plants assimilating more CO2 would reduce this warming...

Second, there is decreasing insolation towards poles during winter, photosynthesis on high latitudes during winter will be insignificant. This effect you've described is most prominent in temperatures range of glaciacions rather than current temperature ranges. Also starting from current climate, further warming will likely cause large deforestation on equatorial regions, so it is more likely to be exactly opposite effect...


I live in Florida, reasonably close to the equator. Freezing temperatures kill more trees and vegetation, than the summer heat. We don't do cold well here.

Most plants prefer a warm, humid climate. Not to mention, about double the current level of CO2. Look up CO2 augmentation for indoor growing. It's no myth, it's studied, tested, and implemented. There are quite a few business that sell the equipment now, as most commercial greenhouses use them. They can grow a measurably superior product, quicker, and cheap too.
10-02-2020 18:07
gfm7175Profile picture★★★☆☆
(438)
thenerdyone314 wrote:
Disclaimer: I do not study anything on this topic. This is just a theory I developed based on a limited knowledge.

It seems to me that these warm winters may actually be a self defense system being deployed by our beloved planet in order to try and balance out the massive amount of greenhouse gases that we are pumping into the atmosphere.

Just last year in my area of the State of Wisconsin, about a couple weeks before today, temperatures dipped down to approx -25degF, and highs were still in the negatives. Was that the "self defense system" that you're talking about? Was that the "warm winters" that you're talking about? But yes, this year, around that same time frame, temperatures have quite often been at or above freezing (32degF). Sure, this winter is "warm" (compared to last year anyway), but last year was "bone cold" (compared to this year, anyway). I chalk it up to "weather being weather" rather than Climate and her battle against Global Warming.

thenerdyone314 wrote:
It is believed that the warm temperatures are due to the ozone layer being destroyed and more UV light reaching the Earth's surface, or something along those lines, but maybe there is another reason for the increase in temperatures.

The ozone layer is not being destroyed. Like I said, I chalk it up to "weather being weather".

thenerdyone314 wrote:
Think about it, with an increase in temperatures, there will be less snow/ice. Less snow/ice will result in more plants being open to the sun and air. By the wonderful process of photosynthesis and the exchange of gases that plants need to survive, more CO2 will be eaten up by the plants that are now active during times that they normally wouldn't be.

The end of January/beginning of February 'high temperatures' in my area of Wisconsin for this year (when compared to the 'high temperatures' from last year) increased by approx 35+ degF. However, our snowfall to date for both years has been rather comparable.

thenerdyone314 wrote:
This would lead to lower greenhouse gas levels than what there would be if these plants were covered in snow and not eating up the harmful gases.

What "greenhouse gases"? What makes a gas into a "greenhouse gas"? How are they "harmful"?

thenerdyone314 wrote:
I don't believe that this will be the sole cure for climate change,

Define "climate change". How do you plan to "cure" an undefined buzzword? What "cure"? How is this going to work, exactly?

thenerdyone314 wrote:
because I don't think that this self defense mechanism is large enough to counter-balance the insane amount of gases that humans pump into the air every year,

Don't worry, we'll be just fine.

thenerdyone314 wrote:
but I do believe that it will help some and that if humans took more of an effort to help reduce the greenhouse gas output, that the Earth would be capable of balancing itself out by changing temperatures and dictating how much CO2 the plants are able to eat up each year.

What "greenhouse gases"? What makes them into "greenhouse gases"? How does this work, exactly?
10-02-2020 18:23
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1775)
We never even got down to freezing this winter. Don't miss it a bit. It's actually been a fairly nice winter, just a little windy, and couldn't fly the drone much. Use to be mild winters, meant we could expect an active hurricane season, with one or more bad storms. Florida has been pretty lucky, and the really bad ones passes us up.




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