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driving with headlights on


driving with headlights on08-11-2019 02:42
tyler9
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(2)
if you drive, don't start driving in the daytime with your headlights on. headlights switched on causes more fuel to be used which causes more pollution. turn off your headlights at every opportunity. and also disable the daytime running lights if you have them
08-11-2019 03:07
GasGuzzler
★★★★☆
(1467)
tyler9 wrote:
if you drive, don't start driving in the daytime with your headlights on. headlights switched on causes more fuel to be used which causes more pollution. turn off your headlights at every opportunity. and also disable the daytime running lights if you have them


1. The fuel burned to run headlights is a fraction of a percent, depending on the vehicle. Newer LEDs would be a fraction of a fraction of a percent.

2. Define pollution. I suspect you mean CO2, which is NOT pollution. It is essential for life.

3. I will leave my lights on, especially when visibility is reduced. People can see me better. Da?

4. I think those 18 wheelers look so sweet at night when they are lit up like a Christmas tree and the entire trailer box is outlined in marker lights. Looks great and safety added value. No question that's a big rig and use caution around it.


spot-
Into the Night is also has delusions of comptance
08-11-2019 18:10
Harry C
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(43)
Irrespective of AGW/CC, minimizing fuel consumption is a worthy goal. There are some very sensible solutions to that goal. One would be to minimize the amount of time that vehicles idle, which is especially profound in traffic. Besides productivity losses, I can't imagine how much fuel is wasted in traffic. Nobody seems to care! The "consensus" is to get people out of private transportation ergo no more traffic.
08-11-2019 19:38
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9807)
Harry C wrote:
Irrespective of AGW/CC, minimizing fuel consumption is a worthy goal. There are some very sensible solutions to that goal. One would be to minimize the amount of time that vehicles idle, which is especially profound in traffic. Besides productivity losses, I can't imagine how much fuel is wasted in traffic. Nobody seems to care! The "consensus" is to get people out of private transportation ergo no more traffic.


Paradox. If the consensus is to get out of private vehicles, why is there so much traffic? Seems to me the consensus is to drive private vehicles.


The Parrot Killer
09-11-2019 05:40
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
tyler9 wrote:
if you drive, don't start driving in the daytime with your headlights on. headlights switched on causes more fuel to be used which causes more pollution. turn off your headlights at every opportunity. and also disable the daytime running lights if you have them


Lights on, are a safety/viability feature, sometimes, it's the law (might be why it's the default in many newer vehicles). In Florida, it's the law, when you use your windshield wipers, your headlights must be on. We are required to have them one hour before sunset as well. Not sure if those ever get enforced.

Lights don't really effect fuel efficiency in any significant manner, not sure if it can be measured. It has been proven that changing your driving habits, can have a significant effect. Pretty simple to check, use the same car, just swap out the drivers.

Cars don't create pollution anymore, our government passed a law...
09-11-2019 19:55
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9807)
HarveyH55 wrote:
tyler9 wrote:
if you drive, don't start driving in the daytime with your headlights on. headlights switched on causes more fuel to be used which causes more pollution. turn off your headlights at every opportunity. and also disable the daytime running lights if you have them


Lights on, are a safety/viability feature, sometimes, it's the law (might be why it's the default in many newer vehicles). In Florida, it's the law, when you use your windshield wipers, your headlights must be on. We are required to have them one hour before sunset as well. Not sure if those ever get enforced.

Lights don't really effect fuel efficiency in any significant manner, not sure if it can be measured. It has been proven that changing your driving habits, can have a significant effect. Pretty simple to check, use the same car, just swap out the drivers.

Cars don't create pollution anymore, our government passed a law...


Heh. It all depends on what someone calls 'pollution'.

Gasoline cars put out primary CO2 and water as their exhaust. Inefficient burns (such as carburetors running a tad outside their optimum such as when you are accelerating, or FADEC engine running with some crappy sensor) means CO will also result. Unburned fuel might also result. You're just pushing unburned gasoline vapor out the exhaust.

Some fuels are somewhat sour (they contain sulfur). Much of it is processed out these days. When a sour fuel is burned, SO2 can also be emitted. The sulfur they extract out is valuable, and is sold to industry.

Using the brake a lot means wasted fuel. You are just converting it into useless heat. Drivers that are heavy on the brake are wasting fuel.

Allow plenty of time to stop. Coast as much as possible before using the brake. Adjust to traffic flow several cars ahead. Don't tailgate. Stay off the phone. You will no only save fuel, you will be a much safer driver! You can anticipate the multiple morons on the road immediately ahead of you better too!

It pays to take care of the car. Burning oil helps no one. Burning coolant helps no one. Old oil contains carbon particulates and acids. It also loses it's lubricating properties. Keep your oil changed (do it as soon as looks like a darkening caramel color, new oil looks like honey). Your owners' manual is a good guide too. If your oil looks like creamed coffee, you have a head gasket leak and you are burning coolant. Get it fixed. You might notice a white smoke from the tailpipe.

If you get bluish smoke, you have an oil leak. Get it fixed. It might be the rings or a valve seal. You are burning oil.

Between all these things, you can improve your gas mileage considerably.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 09-11-2019 20:02
11-11-2019 19:37
tyler9
☆☆☆☆☆
(2)
https://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/fuel-economy/drl-gas-consumption.htm

--------------------------------------------------

How much extra gasoline would Americans use if daytime running lights were mandatory?

by Jennifer Horton

When gasoline prices climb, people will do just about anything to improve their car's fuel consumption. Articles touting the top 10 ways to improve fuel efficiency pop up daily on Web sites and in news publications. For example, methods include keeping your tires inflated, not driving with the windows rolled down, and turning off your headlights.

That last one may be a tad extreme if you're driving at night, but when it comes to daytime running lights, or DRLs, one of the arguments that come up is their consumption of precious gasoline. Daytime running lights, required in many countries for decades, are headlights that run any time the car is on (the taillights and other lights remain off). Countries like Canada, Denmark and Sweden mandate these lights in an effort to prevent daytime accidents.

DRL laws have garnered mixed results. Some people claim the law reduces accidents by making motorists more visible -- Transport Canada, part of Canada's Transport, Infrastructure and Communities portfolio, claims an 11.3 percent reduction in daytime collisions. Others argue that the lights distract oncoming drivers and make people who don't have daytime running lights even less visible and therefore more prone to wrecks. Some detractors also complain that requiring people to drive with their lights always on is a drain on fuel and contributes to air pollution [source: Transport Canada, NMA].

But how much gasoline do the headlights really use? Could they really be affecting the quality of the air? And if the United States -- already the world's top consumer of gasoline -- jumped on the mandatory DRL bandwagon, how much more gasoline would the country consume in a year? The answer may surprise you.

ust as there are several theories concerning the impact of DRLs in car accidents, there are different estimates of how much fuel the headlights actually use. There's no question they consume gasoline -- headlights require power, and the only way your car can produce power is by drawing from the gasoline in your fuel tank. The difficulty comes in figuring out just how much of that gasoline they use and how that number would be impacted if DRLs were mandatory. Like regular light bulbs, you can find headlights in a variety of styles and wattages. You could get some low-beam headlights capable of 160 watts per vehicle, or you could opt for the more economical LED-based lamps that use only 16 watts per vehicle [source: AllQuality, California Energy Commission].

If there were a national standard requiring all cars to use a certain lamp wattage, this daytime running lights dilemma would be a lot easier to figure out. As it is, the actual fuel consumption is going to depend a lot on the brightness of the bulb -- you might see a noticeable difference in your car's thirst for gas with the really bright lamps, or you may not notice any change at all. Transport Canada estimated that DRLs could add anywhere from $3 to more than $40 each year in extra fuel costs -- which was back before fuel prices climbed to record heights in 2008 -- while other government bodies, like the United States National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, state that DRLs decrease fuel efficiency by only a "fraction of a mile per gallon" [source: IIHS]. A European study adds to the confusion with its estimated fuel penalty between 0.5 and 1.5 percent [source: California Energy Commission].

To figure out how much extra gasoline the United States would use if all 244 million cars on its roads were equipped with mandatory DRLs, we'll have to make a few assumptions [source: DOT]. First, we'll assume that DRLs would average out at about 90 watts total -- roughly between the low and the high wattage capabilities, and that the fuel penalty therefore would probably be mid-range as well: about 1 percent. With the help of a graph provided by the Federal Highway Administration, we can see that of the 7 billion miles (11.3 billion kilometers) Americans drive every day, approximately 70 percent of those are driven during daylight hours, which equals about 4.9 billion miles (7.9 billion kilometers) driven during the time when DRLs would be in use. [source: EIA, DOT].

Since the average consumer car in the United States gets about 20.3 miles (32.6 kilometers) per gallon, that means Americans currently use about 241.4 million gallons of gas for driving during daylight hours. To get that number, we divided the number of miles driven throughout the day by the average car's fuel efficiency (4.9 billion miles divided by 20.3 mpg) [source: DOT]. Now, when we factor in the 1 percent reduction in fuel efficiency, that usage increases to 243.9 million gallons -- a difference of more than 2 million gallons.

­

At current U.S. prices ($3.81 per gallon as of August 2008), that would be a total of more than $7.62 million every day [source: EIA]. Of course, when you divide that by the number of cars on the road, it's not even a penny per car. So if you want to contest the purpose of a DRL law, you're going to need more up your sleeve than fuel consumption.


Sources

"Frequently asked questions (Road)." Transport Canada. Nov. 7, 2006. (Aug. 1, 2008) http://www.tc.gc.ca/road/faq.htm#daytimerunninglights
"Highway Statistics 2006." U.S. Department of Transportation: Federal Highway Administration. Feb. 27, 2008. (Aug. 7, 2008) http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/ohim/hs06/index.htm
"Lane Courtesy." National Motorists Association. (Aug. 1, 2008) http://www.motorists.org/drl/
"Low Beam Headlight DRLs." AllQuality Custom Auto Accessories. 2008. (Aug. 7, 2008) http://www.daytime-running-lights.com/Headlight_DRLs.html
"Option 1G: Limiting the Use of Daytime Running Lights and Optional Lamps." California Energy Commission. (Aug. 7, 2008) http://www.energy.ca.gov/2005publications/CEC-600-2005-024/addendum_individual_files/ CEC-600-2005-024-AD-1G.pdf
"Q&As: Daytime Running Lights." Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. January 2008. (Aug. 1, 2008) http://www.iihs.org/research/qanda/drl.html
"U.S. Retail Gasoline Prices." Energy Information Association. Aug. 11, 2008. (Aug. 14, 2008) http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/wrgp/mogas_home_page.html
"Where does my gasoline come from?" Energy Information Administration. April 2008. (Aug. 7, 2008) http://www.eia.doe.gov/bookshelf/brochures/gasoline/index.html
Edited on 11-11-2019 19:38
11-11-2019 22:12
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
Obviously a very rough estimate, base on estimates and assumptions. Which is consistent with the calculations used for anything climate change. The total number of vehicles, and miles driven, are just a guess. Even if you went with vehicle registration, not all of them are driven daily, some not driven at all. Quite a few cars in America already have daytime driving lights, might be the law in some states, don't know, but likely, since the car manufacturers thought it a good idea to add the feature. My 2000 Grand Prix had automatic headlights, never looked to see if I had any control over the daylight headlights.

Seems like less than a penny a day, for a slightly better chance of not getting slammed into, is pretty cheap...
11-11-2019 22:41
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9807)
tyler9 wrote:
...deleted Holy Link...
How much extra gasoline would Americans use if daytime running lights were mandatory?

by Jennifer Horton

Since Jennifer Horton isn't here, and you are just copying and pasting You are using her arguments and reasoning, and not yours. Apparently you can't think for yourself. However, since you decided to swipe her arguments as yours, I will answer them as if they were from you. Unfortunately, since you did not originate any of these arguments, you are in no position to make any counterarguments. Jennifer isn't here.
tyler9 wrote:
When gasoline prices climb, people will do just about anything to improve their car's fuel consumption.

Gasoline is extraordinarily cheap right now. Do not mistake the falling dollar for more expensive gasoline.
tyler9 wrote:
Articles touting the top 10 ways to improve fuel efficiency pop up daily on Web sites and in news publications. For example, methods include keeping your tires inflated, not driving with the windows rolled down, and turning off your headlights.

Some of these make sense, others don't.
tyler9 wrote:
That last one may be a tad extreme if you're driving at night, but when it comes to daytime running lights, or DRLs, one of the arguments that come up is their consumption of precious gasoline.

Not particularly precious. Gasoline is cheap right now. However, we will address the issue of gasoline consumed by headlights in a moment anyway.
tyler9 wrote:
Daytime running lights, required in many countries for decades, are headlights that run any time the car is on (the taillights and other lights remain off). Countries like Canada, Denmark and Sweden mandate these lights in an effort to prevent daytime accidents.

The do help prevent accidents, particularly head-on collision accidents on two way roads...the worse kind.
tyler9 wrote:
DRL laws have garnered mixed results. Some people claim the law reduces accidents by making motorists more visible

It does.
tyler9 wrote:
Others argue that the lights distract oncoming drivers and make people who don't have daytime running lights even less visible and therefore more prone to wrecks.

They are not a distraction. They make a car more visible, particularly at distance. Cars running without them have a greater risk of a head-collision from passing traffic.
tyler9 wrote:
Some detractors also complain that requiring people to drive with their lights always on is a drain on fuel and contributes to air pollution [source: Transport Canada, NMA].

It doesn't do either. You will see why in a moment.
tyler9 wrote:
But how much gasoline do the headlights really use? Could they really be affecting the quality of the air? And if the United States -- already the world's top consumer of gasoline -- jumped on the mandatory DRL bandwagon, how much more gasoline would the country consume in a year? The answer may surprise you.

Now we come to the meat of the issue. Let's look at the math, shall we? It's easily calculated.

A gallon of gasoline contains about 120MJ of energy. This translates into 120MW/second of power. This power is available for generating heat, running an alternator, and for moving the car.

An older style headlamp consumes about 80W. The two are indeed about 160W. These are the worse case, so I will use them. Newer cars that have automatic headlights tend toward the 16W LEDs, so I will also use those in a second example (32W total).

The old headlamps are 160W. This means they are consuming 160 joules per second.

Most older cars with these headlamps get about 25mpg, so I will use this number. This means, that traveling at 60mph, you will consume a gallon of gasoline in about 25 minutes. This is 25*60 seconds or 1560 seconds total. In that 25 minutes, you have used 120MJ of energy to move a car 25 miles, and used 250KJ to light the headlamps. This amounts to about 0.0002% of the total energy in that gasoline was used to light the headlamps for that 25 minutes.

Newer cars with LED headlamps can typically get 30mpg (due to the use of FADEC), so I will use that number for those. The LED headlamps tend to have circuits more automated for daytime headlights.

This car, again traveling at 60mph, will consume a gallon of gasoline in about 30 minutes (or 1800 seconds). During that time, the LED lamps will have consumed 57.6KJ of energy out of that gallon of gasoline, or 0.00005% of that energy.

On the plus side, you are more visible, particularly at distance, which can be a real bonus on high speed two way roads. People attempting to pass slow traffic will see you a lot easier. Preventing head-on crashes this way is the goal of daytime lights.

Just as there are several theories concerning the impact of DRLs in car accidents, there are different estimates of how much fuel the headlights actually use.[/quote]
No estimate necessary. It all comes down to pretty simple math, which I just showed you.
tyler9 wrote:
The difficulty comes in figuring out just how much of that gasoline they use and how that number would be impacted if DRLs were mandatory.

No difficulty required. I did it right here in this post.
tyler9 wrote:
Like regular light bulbs, you can find headlights in a variety of styles and wattages. You could get some low-beam headlights capable of 160 watts per vehicle, or you could opt for the more economical LED-based lamps that use only 16 watts per vehicle [source: AllQuality, California Energy Commission].

Any statistics from the SOTC are summarily dismissed.
tyler9 wrote:
If there were a national standard requiring all cars to use a certain lamp wattage, this daytime running lights dilemma would be a lot easier to figure out.

It is easy to figure out. I just did it right here in this post.
tyler9 wrote:
As it is, the actual fuel consumption is going to depend a lot on the brightness of the bulb

Brightness of the bulb (or LED) is irrelevant. They will consume what they consume regardless of the actual brightness. Watts is not lumens.
tyler9 wrote:
-- you might see a noticeable difference in your car's thirst for gas with the really bright lamps, or you may not notice any change at all. Transport Canada estimated that DRLs could add anywhere from $3 to more than $40 each year in extra fuel costs -- which was back before fuel prices climbed to record heights in 2008

Gas prices are extraordinarily cheap right now. The dollar has fallen, not gas prices going up. The Canadian dollar has fallen too.
tyler9 wrote:
-- while other government bodies, like the United States National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, state that DRLs decrease fuel efficiency by only a "fraction of a mile per gallon" [source: IIHS]. A European study adds to the confusion with its estimated fuel penalty between 0.5 and 1.5 percent [source: California Energy Commission].

Statistics from the SOTC are summarily dismissed. Studies aren't data. Guessing is guessing. They didn't do the math, obviously.
tyler9 wrote:
To figure out how much extra gasoline the United States would use if all 244 million cars on its roads were equipped with mandatory DRLs, we'll have to make a few assumptions [source: DOT]. First, we'll assume that DRLs would average out at about 90 watts total -- roughly between the low and the high wattage capabilities, and that the fuel penalty therefore would probably be mid-range as well: about 1 percent. With the help of a graph provided by the Federal Highway Administration, we can see that of the 7 billion miles (11.3 billion kilometers) Americans drive every day, approximately 70 percent of those are driven during daylight hours, which equals about 4.9 billion miles (7.9 billion kilometers) driven during the time when DRLs would be in use. [source: EIA, DOT].
Argument from randU fallacy. I dismiss FHA figures. They are guessing, and did not do the math. It is not anywhere near 1%. It is, in the worse case scenario, 0.0002%. I suspect the FHA figures are politically motivated.

tyler9 wrote:
Since the average consumer car in the United States gets about 20.3 miles (32.6 kilometers) per gallon, that means Americans currently use about 241.4 million gallons of gas for driving during daylight hours. To get that number, we divided the number of miles driven throughout the day by the average car's fuel efficiency (4.9 billion miles divided by 20.3 mpg) [source: DOT]. Now, when we factor in the 1 percent reduction in fuel efficiency, that usage increases to 243.9 million gallons -- a difference of more than 2 million gallons.

Bad math. You can't use assumptions and call it mathematics.
tyler9 wrote:
At current U.S. prices ($3.81 per gallon as of August 2008), that would be a total of more than $7.62 million every day [source: EIA]. Of course, when you divide that by the number of cars on the road, it's not even a penny per car. So if you want to contest the purpose of a DRL law, you're going to need more up your sleeve than fuel consumption.

You might try the actual math involved. It really is pretty simple.

1 gallon of gasoline contains 120MJ of energy. When a car burns that gallon of gasoline, it moves forward, runs the alternator (powering things like headlights, your music system, etc), and the rest goes into heat (taken away by your exhaust system and cooling system.

As I just showed you, 0.0002% of that gallon goes into lighting the headlamps (and that's on an older car, with the incandescent headlamps!). It only gets better with newer cars and LED lamps.

If you are driving on a two way street above 45mph, turn your daytime headlights on. You just might save your life and the life of both a guy passing slow traffic, and the slow traffic he is passing!

Is that really worth a few drops of gasoline out of a gallon? Yes.


The Parrot Killer
12-11-2019 00:37
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1459)
Driving with headlights on discourages a lot of passing, because it's very difficult to estimate time, speed and distance. You don't know how bright the head lights are, screws up the distance, and the estimated amount of time you have to pass safely.

I don't think climate change is really that important any more. They over marketed it for the past 40 years. It's not new or trendy anymore, none of the prediction even came close. Ice caps are still there, glaciers are still there, polar bears are still knocking over trash cans. The weather, is still as unpredictable as ever, and some people get screwed over by it every year, mostly because they were a little negligent in preventative measures. California wildfires, well it's California...
12-11-2019 02:03
Harry C
☆☆☆☆☆
(43)
Into the Night wrote:
Harry C wrote:
Irrespective of AGW/CC, minimizing fuel consumption is a worthy goal. There are some very sensible solutions to that goal. One would be to minimize the amount of time that vehicles idle, which is especially profound in traffic. Besides productivity losses, I can't imagine how much fuel is wasted in traffic. Nobody seems to care! The "consensus" is to get people out of private transportation ergo no more traffic.


Paradox. If the consensus is to get out of private vehicles, why is there so much traffic? Seems to me the consensus is to drive private vehicles.


I had put the word in quotes to distinguish it. That was the consensus of progressive, leftists, socialist Marxist. I agree the consensus of the public at large is to drive private, and in some cases, large vehicles.


You learn something new every day if you are lucky!
12-11-2019 03:11
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9807)
Harry C wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Harry C wrote:
Irrespective of AGW/CC, minimizing fuel consumption is a worthy goal. There are some very sensible solutions to that goal. One would be to minimize the amount of time that vehicles idle, which is especially profound in traffic. Besides productivity losses, I can't imagine how much fuel is wasted in traffic. Nobody seems to care! The "consensus" is to get people out of private transportation ergo no more traffic.


Paradox. If the consensus is to get out of private vehicles, why is there so much traffic? Seems to me the consensus is to drive private vehicles.


I had put the word in quotes to distinguish it. That was the consensus of progressive, leftists, socialist Marxist. I agree the consensus of the public at large is to drive private, and in some cases, large vehicles.


Okay. Seems we agree. We have reached consensus.



The Parrot Killer




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