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Can UV light affect Coronavirus?


Can UV light affect Coronavirus?14-03-2020 10:34
Nobi
☆☆☆☆☆
(15)
I've read some articles that the UV light might render the coronavirus to be ineffective.
Shanghai has started to use man-made UV light to disinfect their busses:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqytOuYfsnA

What do you guys think? Is UV light effective at all, or this is just another way for UV light lamp manufacturers to make money?

How different is the light from manmade UV lamp and UV light from the sun?
14-03-2020 19:38
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12427)
UV kills most any virus. Yes, it is effective against coronavirus.

UV lamps tend to be a narrower spectrum of UV than what the Sun puts out.

UV light is generally categorized into three sub-bands, called UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. Different sub-bands are filtered out differently by the atmosphere of Earth.

The higher frequency (UV-C) are absorbed by the atmosphere more than the lower frequency (UV-A) light.

UV-C is absorbed by ozone pretty high up, and completely, by the atmosphere. When absorbed, ozone is destroyed and becomes oxygen.

UV-B is absorbed by oxygen a bit lower down. When absorbed, oxygen is destroyed and becomes ozone. Some of this light is not absorbed and reaches the surface. When we are exposed to it, it will cause skin damage (sunburn).

UV-A is absorbed by oxygen too, but not nearly as much. Most of it reaches the surface. When we are exposed to it, it will cause tanning, but little skin damage for already tanned skin.

We can build lights for any band of UV.

For example, we use UV-C lights for printing and etching metal plates. Such machines have protective covers over them and safety interlocks, since exposure to UV-C is extremely dangerous.

We use UV-B for processing making silicon chips, and for some ink hardening, and silk screening. UV-B is not as dangerous, but you can be harmed by it in higher intensity. Do no stare at it long. You will get sunburned eyes (snow blindness).

We use UV-A for things like tanning beds. Some UV-B is also produced by the cheaper beds, and can cause problems. We also use it for silk screening, stamp identification and gates, finding scorpions at night, and looking for biological contaminants on sheets, bedding, and other surfaces.

UV-A light can kill some viruses, but UV-B light is better at it. UV-C is extremely effective at it, but it's a dangerous light to use. Hospitals sterilize their equipment with UV-B and UV-C light. Some swimming pools sterilize their water with UV-B or even UV-A light, and food is sometimes treated this way to remove (kill) contaminants.
Edited on 14-03-2020 19:52
16-03-2020 12:43
Nobi
☆☆☆☆☆
(15)
Into the Night wrote:
UV kills most any virus. Yes, it is effective against coronavirus.

UV lamps tend to be a narrower spectrum of UV than what the Sun puts out.

UV light is generally categorized into three sub-bands, called UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. Different sub-bands are filtered out differently by the atmosphere of Earth.

The higher frequency (UV-C) are absorbed by the atmosphere more than the lower frequency (UV-A) light.

UV-C is absorbed by ozone pretty high up, and completely, by the atmosphere. When absorbed, ozone is destroyed and becomes oxygen.

UV-B is absorbed by oxygen a bit lower down. When absorbed, oxygen is destroyed and becomes ozone. Some of this light is not absorbed and reaches the surface. When we are exposed to it, it will cause skin damage (sunburn).

UV-A is absorbed by oxygen too, but not nearly as much. Most of it reaches the surface. When we are exposed to it, it will cause tanning, but little skin damage for already tanned skin.

We can build lights for any band of UV.

For example, we use UV-C lights for printing and etching metal plates. Such machines have protective covers over them and safety interlocks, since exposure to UV-C is extremely dangerous.

We use UV-B for processing making silicon chips, and for some ink hardening, and silk screening. UV-B is not as dangerous, but you can be harmed by it in higher intensity. Do no stare at it long. You will get sunburned eyes (snow blindness).

We use UV-A for things like tanning beds. Some UV-B is also produced by the cheaper beds, and can cause problems. We also use it for silk screening, stamp identification and gates, finding scorpions at night, and looking for biological contaminants on sheets, bedding, and other surfaces.

UV-A light can kill some viruses, but UV-B light is better at it. UV-C is extremely effective at it, but it's a dangerous light to use. Hospitals sterilize their equipment with UV-B and UV-C light. Some swimming pools sterilize their water with UV-B or even UV-A light, and food is sometimes treated this way to remove (kill) contaminants.


Thank you Into the Night for your extensive explanation! I surely learn alot here.




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