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Global warming will increases grain production



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28-01-2019 19:10
Into the Night
★★★★★
(7133)
littleendian wrote:
Yes, water in the atmosphere is the biggest player in the greenhouse gas game. However, it is very volatile and varies strongly. CO2 is a more "consistent" player in that game, albeit its effect being smaller than water vapor, its effect still being significant. Of course changing average temperatures through CO2 will have an effect on water in the atmosphere.


Nope. There is no such thing as a 'greenhouse' gas. You are again ignoring science. See the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics and the Stefan-Boltzmann law.


The Parrot Killer
28-01-2019 19:13
Into the Night
★★★★★
(7133)
littleendian wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Floods and droughts, and all of the other doomsday prophecies, are fortune-cookie predictions.

No, they are a very real scenario under present climate change:
...deleted Holy Link...

Define 'climate change'. A meaningless buzzword is not a scenario at all.
littleendian wrote:
I know you guys are really not fond of those damn scientists and their conclusions. I've heard nothing so far that makes me think that these doubts are founded on real issues in the science. I suspect it is because you are resisting being inconvenienced by lifestyle changes.

So you now openly deny the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics and the Stefan-Boltzmann law.

No, you can't just discard theories of science, dude.


The Parrot Killer
28-01-2019 19:40
Wake
★★★★★
(3952)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Ever notice how the IPCC avoids water vapor, and quickly changes the subject when it comes into play? I truly believe that it plays a very key role in regulating the temperature down here on the surface. I guess here in Florida, we tend to notice the humidity, more than the northern folks. Another effect of our warm climate, is the storms. Fortunately, during our 'rainy' season and hurricane season, the storms don't usually last long. When we do get the bad storms though, the clouds darken the sky pretty good, most definitely feels like a cooler climate too. Sure, a rather small area, compared to the entire planet, but most of the planet it covered with water, and with sufficient heat, it can become water vapor, and clouds. Seems like CO2 can't do much, if there is no infrared to get it excited, and do it's evil work. Water evaporating also carries off heat from the surface, heat rises, so does the water vapor.

We really haven't had a chance to observe everything the atmosphere does, because it hasn't happened in our existence. It's entirely possible there are other cooling mechanism, some much more powerful than man-made CO2, since we the planet gets brutally cold occasionally, for long periods of time. I really don't see a few degrees increase as an issue to argue about, and I've seen some mighty hot days. A few hundred parts per million is a none issue as well, since there are a lot of volume in the atmosphere, it's not contained either, it expands and contracts.


Water vapor does indeed absorb infrared light just like CO2 does. There is a lot more of it too. However, absorption of surface infrared light does not warm the Earth.

It actually cools the surface.


When are you going to give up passing out stupidities? Not only is there about a world wide average humidity of about 2% all the time but it absorbs almost entirely across the Infrared spectrum whereas CO2 only absorbs in three very narrow bands which are at the very bottom of the Sun's emissions and at the very top of the Earth's emission and hence there is very little energy there.

In case you are unaware of it - the way in which heat is absorbed and moved through either radiation or conduction cools the surfaces from which the heat is extracted.

Is there anything at all that you understand?
28-01-2019 20:49
Into the Night
★★★★★
(7133)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Ever notice how the IPCC avoids water vapor, and quickly changes the subject when it comes into play? I truly believe that it plays a very key role in regulating the temperature down here on the surface. I guess here in Florida, we tend to notice the humidity, more than the northern folks. Another effect of our warm climate, is the storms. Fortunately, during our 'rainy' season and hurricane season, the storms don't usually last long. When we do get the bad storms though, the clouds darken the sky pretty good, most definitely feels like a cooler climate too. Sure, a rather small area, compared to the entire planet, but most of the planet it covered with water, and with sufficient heat, it can become water vapor, and clouds. Seems like CO2 can't do much, if there is no infrared to get it excited, and do it's evil work. Water evaporating also carries off heat from the surface, heat rises, so does the water vapor.

We really haven't had a chance to observe everything the atmosphere does, because it hasn't happened in our existence. It's entirely possible there are other cooling mechanism, some much more powerful than man-made CO2, since we the planet gets brutally cold occasionally, for long periods of time. I really don't see a few degrees increase as an issue to argue about, and I've seen some mighty hot days. A few hundred parts per million is a none issue as well, since there are a lot of volume in the atmosphere, it's not contained either, it expands and contracts.


Water vapor does indeed absorb infrared light just like CO2 does. There is a lot more of it too. However, absorption of surface infrared light does not warm the Earth.

It actually cools the surface.


When are you going to give up passing out stupidities?

Inversion fallacy. I should ask you that question.
Wake wrote:
Not only is there about a world wide average humidity of about 2% all the time but it absorbs almost entirely across the Infrared spectrum
No, it does not. Not even close.
Wake wrote:
whereas CO2 only absorbs in three very narrow bands
Which are different than the narrow bands for water.
Wake wrote:
which are at the very bottom of the Sun's emissions

WRONG. The Sun emits light all the way down into the radio bands.
Wake wrote:
and at the very top of the Earth's emission

WRONG. Earth emits many different frequencies of infrared light.
Wake wrote:
and hence there is very little energy there.

Most of the Sun's energy is infrared, Wake.
Wake wrote:
In case you are unaware of it - the way in which heat is absorbed and moved through either radiation or conduction cools the surfaces from which the heat is extracted.

Try English next time. Absorption is does not cool anything, Wake.
Wake wrote:
Is there anything at all that you understand?

Bulverism fallacy.


The Parrot Killer
28-01-2019 23:36
HarveyH55
★★★☆☆
(463)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Ever notice how the IPCC avoids water vapor, and quickly changes the subject when it comes into play? I truly believe that it plays a very key role in regulating the temperature down here on the surface. I guess here in Florida, we tend to notice the humidity, more than the northern folks. Another effect of our warm climate, is the storms. Fortunately, during our 'rainy' season and hurricane season, the storms don't usually last long. When we do get the bad storms though, the clouds darken the sky pretty good, most definitely feels like a cooler climate too. Sure, a rather small area, compared to the entire planet, but most of the planet it covered with water, and with sufficient heat, it can become water vapor, and clouds. Seems like CO2 can't do much, if there is no infrared to get it excited, and do it's evil work. Water evaporating also carries off heat from the surface, heat rises, so does the water vapor.

We really haven't had a chance to observe everything the atmosphere does, because it hasn't happened in our existence. It's entirely possible there are other cooling mechanism, some much more powerful than man-made CO2, since we the planet gets brutally cold occasionally, for long periods of time. I really don't see a few degrees increase as an issue to argue about, and I've seen some mighty hot days. A few hundred parts per million is a none issue as well, since there are a lot of volume in the atmosphere, it's not contained either, it expands and contracts.


Water vapor does indeed absorb infrared light just like CO2 does. There is a lot more of it too. However, absorption of surface infrared light does not warm the Earth.

It actually cools the surface.


When are you going to give up passing out stupidities? Not only is there about a world wide average humidity of about 2% all the time but it absorbs almost entirely across the Infrared spectrum whereas CO2 only absorbs in three very narrow bands which are at the very bottom of the Sun's emissions and at the very top of the Earth's emission and hence there is very little energy there.

In case you are unaware of it - the way in which heat is absorbed and moved through either radiation or conduction cools the surfaces from which the heat is extracted.

Is there anything at all that you understand?


I don't think molecules work like heat sponges. Heat spreads out, dissipates. Where stuff can't move around, everything would eventually reach the same temperature. The gasses can move, and heat rises, surface heat, would be dissipated upward. The only warming could come from an energy source, like the Sun. For water to evaporate, it needs some heat. More heat, more vapor, the estimate is between 0% to 4%, but suspect it can go higher, if there is sufficient heat. Think around 4% is where it's blocking out much of the solar source. How come H2O isn't the bad guy here, if it's wide spectrum, and does the same as man-made CO2, and can be a thousand times more of it. CO2 would be only left with the scraps, of what H2O didn't grab up. And this isn't a science fiction story...
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