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How can more CO2 inthe air go into ocean?


How can more CO2 inthe air go into ocean?07-02-2019 01:04
Tai Hai Chen
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(944)
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? I think that is not scientific, or else CO2 in the air go into ocean now which is not true because temperature has not changed.
07-02-2019 01:50
Into the Night
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(7175)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? I think that is not scientific, or else CO2 in the air go into ocean now which is not true because temperature has not changed.


Water can hold a hell of a lot more CO2 than any measurement we may have taken of open air or ocean water.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 07-02-2019 01:52
07-02-2019 03:55
still learning
★★☆☆☆
(244)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? .....


The solubility of a gas in water depends on both temperature and pressure.

Higher temperature, lower solubility.

Higher pressure of solute, greater solubility. Increasing the ppm level increases the partial pressure.

This concept is (or was) introduced in high-school chemistry.

That's for gasses generally, including CO2.

CO2 though also undergoes reversible chemical reaction with water to carbonic acid and reversibly on to bicarbonate ion (with H+) and reversibly on to carbonate ion (another H+). This way more solubility for CO2 compared with other gasses.
Edited on 07-02-2019 04:48
07-02-2019 09:35
Into the Night
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(7175)
still learning wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? .....


The solubility of a gas in water depends on both temperature and pressure.

True. However, that is the saturation point. 0.04% of CO2 dissolved in ocean water is not anywhere near the saturation point.
still learning wrote:
Higher temperature, lower solubility.

Higher pressure of solute, greater solubility. Increasing the ppm level increases the partial pressure.

This concept is (or was) introduced in high-school chemistry.

That's for gasses generally, including CO2.

True. But only at the saturation point.
still learning wrote:
CO2 though also undergoes reversible chemical reaction with water to carbonic acid and reversibly on to bicarbonate ion (with H+) and reversibly on to carbonate ion (another H+). This way more solubility for CO2 compared with other gasses.

Only about 1% of the dissolved CO2 becomes carbonic acid at all. Most simply stays as dissolved CO2.


The Parrot Killer
07-02-2019 18:29
Tai Hai Chen
★★★☆☆
(944)
still learning wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? .....


The solubility of a gas in water depends on both temperature and pressure.

Higher temperature, lower solubility.

Higher pressure of solute, greater solubility. Increasing the ppm level increases the partial pressure.

This concept is (or was) introduced in high-school chemistry.

That's for gasses generally, including CO2.

CO2 though also undergoes reversible chemical reaction with water to carbonic acid and reversibly on to bicarbonate ion (with H+) and reversibly on to carbonate ion (another H+). This way more solubility for CO2 compared with other gasses.


Has there been a change in pressure?
07-02-2019 19:08
Into the Night
★★★★★
(7175)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
still learning wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
I think it's pretty well established how much CO2 ocean can hold depends on temperature. For example in 1998 CO2 increased nearly 3 ppm because it was a hot year. Considering there is no change to temperature, why would increasing CO2 in the air cause more CO2 in ocean? .....


The solubility of a gas in water depends on both temperature and pressure.

Higher temperature, lower solubility.

Higher pressure of solute, greater solubility. Increasing the ppm level increases the partial pressure.

This concept is (or was) introduced in high-school chemistry.

That's for gasses generally, including CO2.

CO2 though also undergoes reversible chemical reaction with water to carbonic acid and reversibly on to bicarbonate ion (with H+) and reversibly on to carbonate ion (another H+). This way more solubility for CO2 compared with other gasses.


Has there been a change in pressure?

Pressures change every hour of every day as the weather moves around. Does not affect the solubility significantly. There simply isn't enough CO2 in the atmosphere or the oceans to come anywhere near saturating ocean water.


The Parrot Killer
08-02-2019 03:46
still learning
★★☆☆☆
(244)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:


,,,,,,Has there been a change in pressure?


Yes.
The partial pressure of CO2. The solubility of each gas in water depends, in part on the partial pressure of each. The solubility of nitrogen will depend on it's partial pressure, that is, essentially, it's percentage of the atmospheric composition times the total atmospheric pressure. Likewise CO2. A 3 ppm increase is tiny, but real. In principle, oxygen partial pressure would have decreased by a like amount.




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