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What is Biogeochemistry?



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22-05-2024 02:23
Im a BM
★★★☆☆
(921)
Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning about 1/2 way down page 3.

"Sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist whose published research is often cited in peer-reviewed scientific papers about carbon and nitrogen cycling, and implications for climate change.


duncan61 wrote:
Biogeochemistry is a relatively new scientific discipline that explores the physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes and reactions that govern the composition of and changes to the natural environment. In particular, biogeochemistry studies the cycles of crucial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen, and their interactions with other substances and organisms as they move through Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere (water and ice), biosphere (life), and lithosphere (rock). The field focuses especially on the diverse and interlinked chemical cycles that are either driven by or have an impact on biological activity, in particular carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus.

A prime example is carbon, the building block of life on Earth, and the planet-encompassing carbon cycle. Photosynthetic plants on land and sea take carbon dioxide (a form of inorganic carbon) from the atmosphere and convert it into the organic forms of carbon they need to live and grow. Animals that consume the plants incorporate the organic carbon into their own bodies.

Microbes eventually decompose dead plants and animals, and their carbon is recycled into soils and groundwater or swept into the oceans, where it becomes available to microbes and phytoplankton at the base of the marine food chain or it sinks and is buried in seafloor sediments. Over millions of years, carbon that is buried on land or at the bottom of the ocean becomes incorporated into rocks or hydrocarbons, where it might remain for tens to hundreds of millions of years. Ultimately, volcanoes return some of this carbon to the air as gas, where its heat-trapping properties affect Earth's climate, or else the rocks containing carbon are uplifted onto continents and gradually weathered, releasing their carbon back to the environment and making it available to organisms once again.

Why is it Important?
In a sense, chemicals are like currency, and biogeochemistry is the study of the nearly limitless "transactions" that drive the entire planetary system, including life on Earth. Understanding these fundamental processes provides crucial insights into how life formed, has evolved, is sustained, and is threatened on our planet, and how the various chemical cycles govern and regulate Earth's climate and environment.

Such knowledge enhances our ability to find ways to adapt to climate change and its impacts, enhance agriculture and food production, manage fisheries, mitigate pollution, develop alternative and renewable energy, prevent diseases and create new drugs, and spur innovations that can drive economic prosperity and improve our quality of life.

Straight copy and paste.Have at it


Relevant posts of thread are compiled, beginning 1/2 way down page 3.

FACT: There IS such a thing as "biogeochemistry"
22-05-2024 03:13
keepit
★★★★★
(3286)
itn,
A funny example of einstein's quotes was "doing the same thing repetitively even in the face of disappointing results is one definition of insanity". For example, constantly repeating the phrase "stop spamming" even the it doesn't change anything fits the definition perfectly.
22-05-2024 06:15
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14652)
Im a BM wrote: Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

Nope. There is no such thing as biogleeclubministry.

There is chemistry.

Im a BM wrote: FACT: There IS such a thing as "biogeochemistry"

There is no such thing as bigcolostomy.
22-05-2024 06:20
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14652)
keepit wrote:itn, A funny example of einstein's quotes was "doing the same thing repetitively even in the face of disappointing results is one definition of insanity". For example, constantly repeating the phrase "stop spamming" even the it doesn't change anything fits the definition perfectly.

keepit, a funny example of Einstein's quotes was "People with down syndrome think 1 + 1 = 1. For example, thinking that $1 + $1 = $1 fits the definition perfectly.
23-05-2024 02:54
sealover
★★★★☆
(1681)
Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning about 1/2 way down page 3.

"Sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist whose published research is often cited in peer-reviewed scientific papers about carbon and nitrogen cycling, and implications for climate change.


duncan61 wrote:
Biogeochemistry is a relatively new scientific discipline that explores the physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes and reactions that govern the composition of and changes to the natural environment. In particular, biogeochemistry studies the cycles of crucial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen, and their interactions with other substances and organisms as they move through Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere (water and ice), biosphere (life), and lithosphere (rock). The field focuses especially on the diverse and interlinked chemical cycles that are either driven by or have an impact on biological activity, in particular carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus.

A prime example is carbon, the building block of life on Earth, and the planet-encompassing carbon cycle. Photosynthetic plants on land and sea take carbon dioxide (a form of inorganic carbon) from the atmosphere and convert it into the organic forms of carbon they need to live and grow. Animals that consume the plants incorporate the organic carbon into their own bodies.

Microbes eventually decompose dead plants and animals, and their carbon is recycled into soils and groundwater or swept into the oceans, where it becomes available to microbes and phytoplankton at the base of the marine food chain or it sinks and is buried in seafloor sediments. Over millions of years, carbon that is buried on land or at the bottom of the ocean becomes incorporated into rocks or hydrocarbons, where it might remain for tens to hundreds of millions of years. Ultimately, volcanoes return some of this carbon to the air as gas, where its heat-trapping properties affect Earth's climate, or else the rocks containing carbon are uplifted onto continents and gradually weathered, releasing their carbon back to the environment and making it available to organisms once again.

Why is it Important?
In a sense, chemicals are like currency, and biogeochemistry is the study of the nearly limitless "transactions" that drive the entire planetary system, including life on Earth. Understanding these fundamental processes provides crucial insights into how life formed, has evolved, is sustained, and is threatened on our planet, and how the various chemical cycles govern and regulate Earth's climate and environment.

Such knowledge enhances our ability to find ways to adapt to climate change and its impacts, enhance agriculture and food production, manage fisheries, mitigate pollution, develop alternative and renewable energy, prevent diseases and create new drugs, and spur innovations that can drive economic prosperity and improve our quality of life.

Straight copy and paste.Have at it


Relevant posts of thread are compiled, beginning 1/2 way down page 3.

SEE 5 OTHER THREADS ABOUT BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE
23-05-2024 03:21
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(22183)
Buzzword fallacy.

Science does not use consensus. There is not voting bloc in science.
Climate cannot change.

No gas or vapor has the capability to warm the Earth. You cannot create energy from nothing.
23-05-2024 04:25
sealover
★★★★☆
(1681)
Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning about 1/2 way down page 3.

"Sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist whose published research is often cited in peer-reviewed scientific papers about carbon and nitrogen cycling, and implications for climate change.


duncan61 wrote:
Biogeochemistry is a relatively new scientific discipline that explores the physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes and reactions that govern the composition of and changes to the natural environment. In particular, biogeochemistry studies the cycles of crucial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen, and their interactions with other substances and organisms as they move through Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere (water and ice), biosphere (life), and lithosphere (rock). The field focuses especially on the diverse and interlinked chemical cycles that are either driven by or have an impact on biological activity, in particular carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus.

A prime example is carbon, the building block of life on Earth, and the planet-encompassing carbon cycle. Photosynthetic plants on land and sea take carbon dioxide (a form of inorganic carbon) from the atmosphere and convert it into the organic forms of carbon they need to live and grow. Animals that consume the plants incorporate the organic carbon into their own bodies.

Microbes eventually decompose dead plants and animals, and their carbon is recycled into soils and groundwater or swept into the oceans, where it becomes available to microbes and phytoplankton at the base of the marine food chain or it sinks and is buried in seafloor sediments. Over millions of years, carbon that is buried on land or at the bottom of the ocean becomes incorporated into rocks or hydrocarbons, where it might remain for tens to hundreds of millions of years. Ultimately, volcanoes return some of this carbon to the air as gas, where its heat-trapping properties affect Earth's climate, or else the rocks containing carbon are uplifted onto continents and gradually weathered, releasing their carbon back to the environment and making it available to organisms once again.

Why is it Important?
In a sense, chemicals are like currency, and biogeochemistry is the study of the nearly limitless "transactions" that drive the entire planetary system, including life on Earth. Understanding these fundamental processes provides crucial insights into how life formed, has evolved, is sustained, and is threatened on our planet, and how the various chemical cycles govern and regulate Earth's climate and environment.

Such knowledge enhances our ability to find ways to adapt to climate change and its impacts, enhance agriculture and food production, manage fisheries, mitigate pollution, develop alternative and renewable energy, prevent diseases and create new drugs, and spur innovations that can drive economic prosperity and improve our quality of life.

Straight copy and paste.Have at it


Relevant posts of thread are compiled, beginning 1/2 way down page 3.

SEE 5 OTHER THREADS ABOUT BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE
23-05-2024 05:31
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14652)
Im a BM wrote: Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

Nope. There is no such thing as biogleeclubministry.

There is chemistry.

Im a BM wrote: FACT: There IS such a thing as "biogeochemistry"

There is no such thing as bigcolostomy.
23-05-2024 22:55
Im a BM
★★★☆☆
(921)
IBdaMann wrote:
Im a BM wrote: Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

Nope. There is no such thing as biogleeclubministry.

There is chemistry.

Im a BM wrote: FACT: There IS such a thing as "biogeochemistry"

There is no such thing as bigcolostomy.



After nine years of... posting, maybe you should compile some of your "greatest hits".

IBdaMann and Into the Night, I encourage both of you to find the BEST of your past posts and compile them so they can all be seen together in one place.

The posts where you make the most convincing argument to prove your... whatever your point is.

I hope that they won't all be one liners like

Define your terms.

There is no such thing as 'climate change'.

Science is not...

You are a liar.

You are a moron.

You don't even know what science is.

Stop spamming.

Surely, after eight or nine years, you have posted something that is of lasting value and you are proud to share it again.

I mean, "Biogeochemistry debunked", for example. So much to be learned from it.

Please put together an album of your greatest hits, so people will have some idea what the eff you are even trying to say.

Or at least prove that you HAVE something to say.

Other than trolling other people's posts on threads you don't even understand.
24-05-2024 00:51
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(22183)
Im a BM wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Im a BM wrote: Yes, there IS such as thing as "biogeochemistry".

Nope. There is no such thing as biogleeclubministry.

There is chemistry.

Im a BM wrote: FACT: There IS such a thing as "biogeochemistry"

There is no such thing as bigcolostomy.



After nine years of... posting, maybe you should compile some of your "greatest hits".

IBdaMann and Into the Night, I encourage both of you to find the BEST of your past posts and compile them so they can all be seen together in one place.

The posts where you make the most convincing argument to prove your... whatever your point is.

I hope that they won't all be one liners like

Define your terms.

There is no such thing as 'climate change'.

Science is not...

You are a liar.

You are a moron.

You don't even know what science is.

Stop spamming.

Surely, after eight or nine years, you have posted something that is of lasting value and you are proud to share it again.

I mean, "Biogeochemistry debunked", for example. So much to be learned from it.

Please put together an album of your greatest hits, so people will have some idea what the eff you are even trying to say.

Or at least prove that you HAVE something to say.

Other than trolling other people's posts on threads you don't even understand.

Stop whining.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
24-05-2024 01:43
keepit
★★★★★
(3286)
itn,
He's not whining. He's trying to educate you. Personally, i think it's hopeless. Myself, i like to cogitate on the issues that come up here. By seeing the nonsense that comes out here, i formulate better ideas.
24-05-2024 01:43
keepit
★★★★★
(3286)
itn,
He's not whining. He's trying to educate you. Personally, i think it's hopeless. Myself, i like to cogitate on the issues that come up here. By seeing the nonsense that comes out here, i formulate better ideas.
24-05-2024 06:04
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14652)
keepit wrote: itn, He's not whining. He's trying to educate you.

keepit, you're full of baloney. squeal-over furniture has done nothing but preach Global Warming since arrival. He refuses to define his terms, which precludes him from trying to teach anything. Either he has a one-way conversation, i.e. he preaches and you listen, or he pouts like a baby all the way home.

You, on the other hand, rarely have a coherent point. When you do, it's always absurdly wrong.

You've made too many false statements, keepit. You can't be believed.

keepit wrote: Myself, i like to cogitate on the issues that come up here.

Baloney. You aren't capable of any thinking. Show me a post of yours that reflects thinking on your part.

keepit wrote: By seeing the nonsense that comes out here, i formulate better ideas.

You have never formulated an idea. You only spew baloney.
24-05-2024 06:40
keepit
★★★★★
(3286)
ibd,
You're working way too hard. Relax.
24-05-2024 18:02
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14652)
keepit wrote:ibd, You're working way too hard. Relax.

Calm down, keepit. There's no need to get all triggered.
24-05-2024 19:55
sealover
★★★★☆
(1681)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning about 1/2 way down page 3.

"Sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist whose published research is often cited in peer-reviewed scientific papers about carbon and nitrogen cycling, and implications for climate change.


duncan61 wrote:
Biogeochemistry is a relatively new scientific discipline that explores the physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes and reactions that govern the composition of and changes to the natural environment. In particular, biogeochemistry studies the cycles of crucial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen, and their interactions with other substances and organisms as they move through Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere (water and ice), biosphere (life), and lithosphere (rock). The field focuses especially on the diverse and interlinked chemical cycles that are either driven by or have an impact on biological activity, in particular carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus.

A prime example is carbon, the building block of life on Earth, and the planet-encompassing carbon cycle. Photosynthetic plants on land and sea take carbon dioxide (a form of inorganic carbon) from the atmosphere and convert it into the organic forms of carbon they need to live and grow. Animals that consume the plants incorporate the organic carbon into their own bodies.

Microbes eventually decompose dead plants and animals, and their carbon is recycled into soils and groundwater or swept into the oceans, where it becomes available to microbes and phytoplankton at the base of the marine food chain or it sinks and is buried in seafloor sediments. Over millions of years, carbon that is buried on land or at the bottom of the ocean becomes incorporated into rocks or hydrocarbons, where it might remain for tens to hundreds of millions of years. Ultimately, volcanoes return some of this carbon to the air as gas, where its heat-trapping properties affect Earth's climate, or else the rocks containing carbon are uplifted onto continents and gradually weathered, releasing their carbon back to the environment and making it available to organisms once again.

Why is it Important?
In a sense, chemicals are like currency, and biogeochemistry is the study of the nearly limitless "transactions" that drive the entire planetary system, including life on Earth. Understanding these fundamental processes provides crucial insights into how life formed, has evolved, is sustained, and is threatened on our planet, and how the various chemical cycles govern and regulate Earth's climate and environment.

Such knowledge enhances our ability to find ways to adapt to climate change and its impacts, enhance agriculture and food production, manage fisheries, mitigate pollution, develop alternative and renewable energy, prevent diseases and create new drugs, and spur innovations that can drive economic prosperity and improve our quality of life.

Straight copy and paste.Have at it


Relevant posts of thread are compiled, beginning 1/2 way down page 3.

SEE 5 OTHER THREADS ABOUT BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GLOBAL CHANGE
24-05-2024 22:44
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(22183)
Stop spamming.
Page 4 of 4<<<234





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