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20-05-2022 23:24
James_
★★★☆☆
(918)
Xadoman wrote:
Hybrids are more efficient because the ice engine operates at optimal load. ICE engine ticking slowly around the town is inefficient. Simple as that. The overall efficiency is however questionable.



Does this include the electricity generated while breaking? That is a part of where electric cars get their energy from.
Also to be like the Devil, do gas motors require more energy to accelerate than an electric motor? I mean when we factor 1/2mv^2 which is actually
1/2 m(d/t)^2, aren't combustion engines less efficient when accelerating?
I could have so much fun with this getting into valve time, compression and spark
gap timing but too many variables reduce efficiency.
21-05-2022 00:33
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(835)
Does this include the electricity generated while breaking? That is a part of where electric cars get their energy from.


ICE-s running a wide range of rpm-s are not efficient. It is more efficient to occasionally turn on an ICE and run it at optimal load to load a battery bank and then to use the stored energy to move the car with an electric motor. The ICE cylinder deactivation system also uses the same principle - shutting down cylinders rises the load in other cylinders closer to the optimal load. The difference however is probably minuscule. Some eco freaks might like those systems .Not me.
21-05-2022 00:45
James_
★★★☆☆
(918)
Xadoman wrote:
Does this include the electricity generated while breaking? That is a part of where electric cars get their energy from.


ICE-s running a wide range of rpm-s are not efficient. It is more efficient to occasionally turn on an ICE and run it at optimal load to load a battery bank and then to use the stored energy to move the car with an electric motor. The ICE cylinder deactivation system also uses the same principle - shutting down cylinders rises the load in other cylinders closer to the optimal load. The difference however is probably minuscule. Some eco freaks might like those systems .Not me.



I'm going to have some fun with your post, okay? Can we discuss valve timing
along with lift and duration? Before we get into electrical engines let's discuss gas engines, okay?
Can we discuss compression ratios and how that influences combustion? Also are
we talking fuel injection or a naturally aspirated carburetor? Then we get into the size of the needle valve and it's carburetor bowl and the venturi effect.
I like gas engines. Between science and politics, what will survive?
And seriously speaking, I like gasoline powered engines. I'm a "car nut" at heart.
How to allow for both? That's the answer we need.

For me to be an as$hole, I've owned both a 1969 Buick GS400 California Special and a GTO 400 via 1967. I hate my family.
I mean seriously, to own only one of those cars? I owned both. That is so fooked up.
Edited on 21-05-2022 00:52
21-05-2022 09:46
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(835)
Here is a good site for learning about ICE engines and VVT-s( variable valve timing).

https://pattakon.com/pattakonLiftTiming.htm

Here is the theory in practice:

https://pattakon.com/pattakonIdleValve.htm

Here is a theory and also a program about ICE engine internal balancing. You can compare different engines and their balancing. This is about how smooth the engine is.

Here is a quote from Manolis about v12:

What perfect balancing means:
Take a look at the inertia loads of the even firing V12 in 60 degrees. If we had an ideal balancing machine and the pistons, connecting rods, crankshaft, balance webs etc were selected so well to measure an unbalanced inertia force of only 1 Kp at the revs (and rest data) used in the balance program, no matter what we change on the crankshaft or on the pistons or on the connecting rods, the inertia force cannot decrease any more. This is the limit. This is the best the best V12 at 60 degrees can do. But if we had the GRECOi3 (or a Wankel Rotary), the balancing can continue as long as we like. Maybe with more rigid shafts. Maybe with less lash between the rollers and the single-lobe cams. But we can continue and can achieve (at the same revs) inertia force less than 1 Kp of the V12, less than 0.5 Kp, less than 0.25 Kp. This is the meaning of the perfect balancing.


I keep my eyes on v12 tdi Audi Q7-s. 368kw and 1000nm of torque. Here is also a quote from some article I found about them:

The V12 TDI aggregate has a cylinder clearance of 90 mm, which is standard for engines of this type. Nonetheless, the engine has a cylinder angle of 60° instead of 90°, leading to an elimination of inertia in this type of V12 design. Driving comfort is thus ensured in every situation.


Engine sound:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zqmY2TS7TI&ab_channel=SmallEngines
Edited on 21-05-2022 09:56
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