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Tides is the result of the rotation of the Earth and whirlpools.



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10-02-2020 12:05
Yusup05
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(52)
A holistic workable dynamic theory of tides has not yet been completed, it is still being written. For this reason, a dynamic theory cannot be found on the Internet.
At the same time, a dynamic theory is considered the main theory, it is taught in educational institutions, and tidal calendars are compiled on it.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tide https://www.encyclopedia.com/earth-and-environment/geology-and-oceanography/geology-and-oceanography/tides.
10-02-2020 12:07
Yusup05
★☆☆☆☆
(52)
A holistic workable dynamic theory of tides has not yet been completed, it is still being written. For this reason, a dynamic theory cannot be found on the Internet.
At the same time, a dynamic theory is considered the main theory, it is taught in educational institutions, and tidal calendars are compiled on it.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tide https://www.encyclopedia.com/earth-and-environment/geology-and-oceanography/geology-and-oceanography/tides.
10-02-2020 12:10
Yusup05
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(52)
[quote]Yusup05 wrote:
A holistic workable dynamic theory of tides has not yet been completed, it is still being written. For this reason, a dynamic theory cannot be found on the Internet.
10-02-2020 12:11
Yusup05
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(52)
According to the dynamic theory of tides, a tidal wave in the northern hemisphere, crashing into an island, begins to rotate around the island counterclockwise.
If we imagine that instead of a wave in the ocean a long rope moves, then one half of the rope will rotate in one direction, and the other half in the other.
There are hundreds of islands on Earth, but no one has yet recorded a tidal wave that moves around the island at a speed of 800 to 1600 km / h.
25-08-2020 15:21
Yusup05
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(52)
It is believed that the abnormally high "tides of the century" 15 meters high in the Gulf of Saint-Malo, France, are formed during the parade of the planets. Then why in other bays of France and the northern hemisphere, during the parade of the planets, abnormally high "tides of the century" are not formed.
Moreover, in some bays of the Northern Hemisphere during the parade of planets, abnormally low "tides of the century" are formed. (Bay of Fundy, Ungava, Mezen, Penzhinskaya Bay, etc.).
23-09-2020 19:16
Spongy Iris
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(198)
Into the Night wrote:

As well as the variations of Earth's position to the Sun. (why we get the lowest tide of the year in June, and the highest tide of the year in December, for the northern hemisphere).


In the northern hemisphere, June is maximum sunlight (lowest tide) and December is minimum sunlight (highest tide)

Tides are higher at night than at day.

This correlation suggests more light weakens tides.

There are experiments that have shown light has anti gravity properties.

Tiny diamonds have been levitated by laser beams.

If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier.

If you weigh yourself before going to sleep at night, then weigh yourself when you wake up in the morning, you will lose 1 pound even if you don't relieve yourself of bodily waste during this time.

The theory is gravity is a pushing force from both above and below. This causes tides and winds.

Further reasoning in regards to lunar cycles:

The moon gets its light from the sun.

Tides are highest at full moon and new moon. The moon is most directly lined up at this time and is taking more light.

Tides are lowest at half moon. The moon is most indirectly lined up with the sun and taking less light.
02-10-2020 22:39
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13500)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:

As well as the variations of Earth's position to the Sun. (why we get the lowest tide of the year in June, and the highest tide of the year in December, for the northern hemisphere).


In the northern hemisphere, June is maximum sunlight (lowest tide) and December is minimum sunlight (highest tide)

Tides are higher at night than at day.

No, they are not.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This correlation suggests more light weakens tides.

There is no correlation.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There are experiments that have shown light has anti gravity properties.

Light does not cancel gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tiny diamonds have been levitated by laser beams.

Light can apply a force. It is possible to direct that force opposite the force of gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier.

Paradox. Which is it, dude?
Spongy Iris wrote:
The theory is gravity is a pushing force from both above and below.

Gravity does not repel. Gravity always attracts. See Newton's law of gravitational attraction.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This causes tides and winds.

No. Uneven heating causes winds. The position and distance from the Moon, the Sun, and the other planets cause tides.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Further reasoning in regards to lunar cycles:

The moon gets its light from the sun.

Tides are highest at full moon and new moon. The moon is most directly lined up at this time and is taking more light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tides are lowest at half moon. The moon is most indirectly lined up with the sun and taking less light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun. Light does not affect tides.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
06-10-2020 01:26
Spongy Iris
★★☆☆☆
(198)
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:

As well as the variations of Earth's position to the Sun. (why we get the lowest tide of the year in June, and the highest tide of the year in December, for the northern hemisphere).


In the northern hemisphere, June is maximum sunlight (lowest tide) and December is minimum sunlight (highest tide)

Tides are higher at night than at day.

No, they are not.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This correlation suggests more light weakens tides.

There is no correlation.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There are experiments that have shown light has anti gravity properties.

Light does not cancel gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tiny diamonds have been levitated by laser beams.

Light can apply a force. It is possible to direct that force opposite the force of gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier.

Paradox. Which is it, dude?
Spongy Iris wrote:
The theory is gravity is a pushing force from both above and below.

Gravity does not repel. Gravity always attracts. See Newton's law of gravitational attraction.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This causes tides and winds.

No. Uneven heating causes winds. The position and distance from the Moon, the Sun, and the other planets cause tides.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Further reasoning in regards to lunar cycles:

The moon gets its light from the sun.

Tides are highest at full moon and new moon. The moon is most directly lined up at this time and is taking more light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tides are lowest at half moon. The moon is most indirectly lined up with the sun and taking less light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun. Light does not affect tides.


Tide tables show tides at midnight are always higher than tides at noon.

If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier. You're heavier at midnight (sun underneath you) than noon (sun above you). If light applies a force opposite gravity (anti gravity) than more of the anti gravity force is present for you at noon than midnight.

If uneven heating causes winds, why doesn't most wind blow straight up, or north or south, where heating is more uneven?
Why does most wind blow east or west, where heating is more even?

Why are high and low tides pretty close to the same times every day if the moon rises and sets about 50 minutes later every day?
08-10-2020 21:05
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13500)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:

As well as the variations of Earth's position to the Sun. (why we get the lowest tide of the year in June, and the highest tide of the year in December, for the northern hemisphere).


In the northern hemisphere, June is maximum sunlight (lowest tide) and December is minimum sunlight (highest tide)

Tides are higher at night than at day.

No, they are not.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This correlation suggests more light weakens tides.

There is no correlation.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There are experiments that have shown light has anti gravity properties.

Light does not cancel gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tiny diamonds have been levitated by laser beams.

Light can apply a force. It is possible to direct that force opposite the force of gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier.

Paradox. Which is it, dude?
Spongy Iris wrote:
The theory is gravity is a pushing force from both above and below.

Gravity does not repel. Gravity always attracts. See Newton's law of gravitational attraction.
Spongy Iris wrote:
This causes tides and winds.

No. Uneven heating causes winds. The position and distance from the Moon, the Sun, and the other planets cause tides.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Further reasoning in regards to lunar cycles:

The moon gets its light from the sun.

Tides are highest at full moon and new moon. The moon is most directly lined up at this time and is taking more light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tides are lowest at half moon. The moon is most indirectly lined up with the sun and taking less light.

The Moon is always receiving the same light from the Sun. Light does not affect tides.


Tide tables show tides at midnight are always higher than tides at noon.

No, they don't.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If you put light underneath an object, the object will get heavier.

Light is not mass. It does not increase mass.
Spongy Iris wrote:
You're heavier at midnight (sun underneath you) than noon (sun above you).

No, you aren't.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If light applies a force opposite gravity (anti gravity) than more of the anti gravity force is present for you at noon than midnight.

Light has not anti-gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If uneven heating causes winds, why doesn't most wind blow straight up, or north or south, where heating is more uneven?

Heating is most uneven at the equator, not the poles. Uneven heating is everywhere. Even at the poles.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Why does most wind blow east or west, where heating is more even?

Storms are caused by uneven heating of the Sun. Winds blow around storms.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Why are high and low tides pretty close to the same times every day if the moon rises and sets about 50 minutes later every day?

They aren't.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
11-10-2020 09:06
Spongy Iris
★★☆☆☆
(198)
A full up down cycle in tides usually is ~ 24 hours and 50 minutes in duration.

The highest tide time of the day will be ~ 50 minutes later each day.

This correlates with the moon rising and setting ~ 50 minutes later each day.

But how does this show the moon's gravitational pull causes tides?

Waves on the Pacific Coast of North America don't move away from the coast when the moon is setting.

Is there any causation to this correlation? Or is it just a coincidence?

Tides do not match the 24 hour day night cycle either, so don't appear to be correlated to earths rotation.

Tides / Waves are not correlated to wind direction either.

My guess is they are formed mostly from the part of gravity which is a push from above.

It is logical to think waves in the ocean are formed by gravity that is a push from above, because of their form.

It does not seem logical to think waves would form as they do from the moon's gravitational pull.

You may also consider a part of gravity to be a push from below.

There are experiments that show light has an oppositional force to gravity.

If you put light underneath an object it gets heavier.

Weigh yourself at night time before falling asleep. Weigh yourself in the morning when you wake up. Make sure you don't relieve yourself during the experiment time. You will lose 1 pound. Where did the weight go? Could it be, you got lighter because the light above you opposed some gravity?

Another experiment is diamonds have been levitated by lasers. Was this experiment done by putting light above them?

Another observation is tides are higher at winter than summer. Could it be tides are lower in summer because light stays above the horizon longer?
11-10-2020 20:48
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13500)
Spongy Iris wrote:
A full up down cycle in tides usually is ~ 24 hours and 50 minutes in duration.

The highest tide time of the day will be ~ 50 minutes later each day.

This correlates with the moon rising and setting ~ 50 minutes later each day.

But how does this show the moon's gravitational pull causes tides?

It doesn't. The Earth and the Moon orbit each other around a point called the barycenter. This point is not at Earth's center of mass. The offset center of mass causes uneven distribution gravity over Earth's surface. Where gravity is weaker, you will see high tides.
A full up/down cycle of tides requires approximately 12 hours and 25 minutes. There are two high tides in each 24 hour 50 minute period.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Waves on the Pacific Coast of North America don't move away from the coast when the moon is setting.

Waves are caused by wind.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Is there any causation to this correlation? Or is it just a coincidence?

No correlation.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tides do not match the 24 hour day night cycle either, so don't appear to be correlated to earths rotation.

24 hours, 50 minutes. It is the combination of Earth's rotation and the Moon's position in the sky. The Sun also effects tides, and so do all of the planets (much less of a factor).
Spongy Iris wrote:
Tides / Waves are not correlated to wind direction either.

Tides are not. Waves are. Once they get going, they have mass. They will keep going even in the face of a headwind for some distance.
Spongy Iris wrote:
My guess is they are formed mostly from the part of gravity which is a push from above.

Gravity doesn't push. Denial of Newton's Law of Gravity.
Spongy Iris wrote:
It is logical to think waves in the ocean are formed by gravity that is a push from above, because of their form.

Gravity doesn't push.
Spongy Iris wrote:
It does not seem logical to think waves would form as they do from the moon's gravitational pull.

No. Waves are formed by the wind.
Spongy Iris wrote:
You may also consider a part of gravity to be a push from below.

Gravity doesn't push.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There are experiments that show light has an oppositional force to gravity.

No. Light can move in any direction.
Spongy Iris wrote:
If you put light underneath an object it gets heavier.

Light does not increase mass.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Weigh yourself at night time before falling asleep. Weigh yourself in the morning when you wake up. Make sure you don't relieve yourself during the experiment time. You will lose 1 pound. Where did the weight go? Could it be, you got lighter because the light above you opposed some gravity?

Water loss due to sweat and moisture loss from breathing. Yes. People sweat all the time, even when sleeping.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Another experiment is diamonds have been levitated by lasers. Was this experiment done by putting light above them?

No.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Another observation is tides are higher at winter than summer.

An effect of the angle of the Moon's orbit and Earth's tilt.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Could it be tides are lower in summer because light stays above the horizon longer?

Light doesn't affect tides.

Denial of science.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
11-10-2020 21:27
Spongy Iris
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(198)
Waves near the shore move toward the shore even when wind is prevailing in the opposite direction.

Do you really lose 1 pound of liquid weight overnight just by sweating and breathing? Urinating and defecating in the morning might take off 1 pound. Do consider how much liquids and solids come out during these excretion processes. Is that how much sweat is on your bed every morning? I don't think so.
Edited on 11-10-2020 21:28
12-10-2020 07:56
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13500)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Waves near the shore move toward the shore even when wind is prevailing in the opposite direction.

Yup. They formed out at sea and they continue to move in that same direction. Waves move in all directions at sea because winds blow in all directions.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Do you really lose 1 pound of liquid weight overnight just by sweating and breathing?
Yup.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Urinating and defecating in the morning might take off 1 pound. Do consider how much liquids and solids come out during these excretion processes. Is that how much sweat is on your bed every morning? I don't think so.

Why do you change your sheets from time to time? Because people sweat while they are sleeping.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
12-10-2020 23:54
Spongy Iris
★★☆☆☆
(198)
There is not 1 pound of sweat on your bed every morning (or 2 pounds if you're married). Consider how soaked your bed would be if you poured 2 cups of water on it (4 cups if married). Is that how wet your bed is every morning???

There are never waves at the shore moving away from the shore. There is often wind at the shore, blowing away from shore. Logic thus tells you, wind isn't what causes waves.

The waves at sea are more random. The waves at the shore are less random. At sea you are surrounded by liquid. At shore you are on solid ground. Solids have more density than liquid. Hey look, more density less entropy.
13-10-2020 12:20
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13500)
Spongy Iris wrote:
There is not 1 pound of sweat on your bed every morning (or 2 pounds if you're married).

You forgot the moisture lost by breathing.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There are never waves at the shore moving away from the shore.

Yes there are. Go down and look at the way the wind can create offshore wave action.
Spongy Iris wrote:
There is often wind at the shore, blowing away from shore.

True. Waves will move away from shore as well as others that approach the shore.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Logic thus tells you, wind isn't what causes waves.

Wind causes waves.
Spongy Iris wrote:
The waves at sea are more random.

Winds at sea are in all directions.
Spongy Iris wrote:
The waves at the shore are less random.

Waves approaching shore are pushed higher due to colliding with the land in shallow water. Waves moving away from shore do not have this problem.
Spongy Iris wrote:
At sea you are surrounded by liquid. At shore you are on solid ground.

Waves move in all directions at the shore also. The ones approaching shore have had wind behind them longer, and their tops rise as the wave strikes the shallow bottom.
Spongy Iris wrote:
Solids have more density than liquid. Hey look, more density less entropy.

Entropy is not decreasing. Water is not turning into land.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
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