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Surplus electricity from wind power



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31-10-2020 07:23
manolis
☆☆☆☆☆
(10)
Hello all.

Hello HarveyH55


What difference makes a patent?


In order to get a patent you have to disclose your invention.
The disclosure (text and drawings) must be complete in the meaning that a "skilled in the art" who reads it, should become able to make / apply the invention.

Then you have to show / explain that your idea is new, that it has an inventive step (which means that what your invention proposes is not obvious to a "skilled in the art") and that it is applicable.

Then you have to define the protection you ask, i.e. what EXACTLY is yours. During the examination of the patent the claims may be amended a few times to bypass the objections of the examiner, or to comply with the suggestions of the examiner.

If a patent is finally granted, it means that an authorized (for this work) independent third party specialized in the technological area agrees that what you disclose and claim is yours, which means nobody else can make, use or sell your invention in the territory of the specific Patent Office.


In our world, by getting a patent, you have something.
Take it, and then you can maintain it in force, or you can withdraw it, or you can leave it to expire.
Your name and idea will remain in the Patent Offices for long (maybe for centuries): anyone who searches may read it and see who invented it and how he was thinking.

Without a patent, you have nothing.


Here is the US patent number 1,000 patented in 1838:



Thanks
Manolis Pattakos
31-10-2020 21:16
Xadoman
★★★☆☆
(616)
Hi Manolis

How many patents do you have currently? What was the first thing you patented?
03-11-2020 09:05
Carlos D Silva
☆☆☆☆☆
(2)
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


Have you seen the movie "The boy who harnessed the wind'? It will give you a general idea. If you need specific info, I suggest you can watch a few youtube videos about the technical aspects. The electricity produced from the wind cannot be used directly but needs to be stored in batteries that are usually located at the base of the turbines. The surplus production can be used later. However, people who manage wind turbines have to plan according to the weather, which they monitor through websites like climacell.co. I am not an expert, but I have read that 1 hour of turbine energy would not produce electricity for 1 hour. The calculations are a lot more complicated, so they need weather monitoring to determine how much energy the turbine can generate.
28-01-2021 22:20
SwanProfile picture★★★☆☆
(571)
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


LOL what state would you pick to be turned into a battery? Montana perhaps, or maybe Illinois or Ohio?
29-01-2021 02:09
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
Carlos D Silva wrote:
[quote]AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.

I'll reply anyway. Yes. Storing electricity in batteries from a generator like this is called 'ballasting'. A battery is essentially a 'tank' for electrons. Like any tank, it can only hold so much, depending on its size and pressure (in this case, voltage per cell).
Carlos D Silva wrote:
Have you seen the movie "The boy who harnessed the wind'? It will give you a general idea. If you need specific info, I suggest you can watch a few youtube videos about the technical aspects. The electricity produced from the wind cannot be used directly but needs to be stored in batteries that are usually located at the base of the turbines.

It can be used directly or stored in a ballast, such as battery or pumping water uphill.
Carlos D Silva wrote:
The surplus production can be used later.

True. However, the surplus stored is all that can be used. Ballasting systems are expensive. Wind doesn't produce sufficient power to fully charge a large ballasting system unless you never use it.
Carlos D Silva wrote:
However, people who manage wind turbines have to plan according to the weather, which they monitor through websites like climacell.co. I am not an expert, but I have read that 1 hour of turbine energy would not produce electricity for 1 hour.

Turbines are not energy. One hour of wind action on the turbine will produce electricity for one hour (assuming the turbine is hooked to a generator).
Carlos D Silva wrote:
The calculations are a lot more complicated,

Nope. One hour is one hour. There not even a conversion of any units.
Carlos D Silva wrote:
so they need weather monitoring to determine how much energy the turbine can generate.

Turbines don't generate energy. They convert wind energy (a kind of solar power) to mechanical energy, and from that to electrical energy (for electricity producing turbines).

Wind turbines are also used to pump water, a popular use on many farms.

Ballasting is fine. It does not create additional energy however. Joules are joules. The wind just doesn't have the energy to see the needs of modern society today.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
29-01-2021 02:20
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
Swan wrote:
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


LOL what state would you pick to be turned into a battery? Montana perhaps, or maybe Illinois or Ohio?


Lake Roosevelt, in Washington State, is a ballast of water used to produce electricity. A LOT of electricity. This ballast is filled by nature, not by using a wind turbine. The Grand Coulee dam powerhouse supplies electrical power to a large area, and most of it is exported to the SOTC (since they refuse to produce their own power and depend almost entirely on imported power).

Montana is indeed part of a ballasting system that spreads down through North and South Dakota, Illinois, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. We call it the Missouri and the Mississippi river system.

Some of this is dammed and produces hydroelectric power, but this river system is not really conducive to the construction of dams. The land is too flat.

Waterwheels can be used though, and they do exist along this river in places.

We call it the Missouri river.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
31-01-2021 22:20
SwanProfile picture★★★☆☆
(571)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


LOL what state would you pick to be turned into a battery? Montana perhaps, or maybe Illinois or Ohio?


Lake Roosevelt, in Washington State, is a ballast of water used to produce electricity. A LOT of electricity. This ballast is filled by nature, not by using a wind turbine. The Grand Coulee dam powerhouse supplies electrical power to a large area, and most of it is exported to the SOTC (since they refuse to produce their own power and depend almost entirely on imported power).

Montana is indeed part of a ballasting system that spreads down through North and South Dakota, Illinois, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. We call it the Missouri and the Mississippi river system.

Some of this is dammed and produces hydroelectric power, but this river system is not really conducive to the construction of dams. The land is too flat.

Waterwheels can be used though, and they do exist along this river in places.

We call it the Missouri river.


Dams are driving migratory fish species to extinction, not environmentally safe
01-02-2021 00:24
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(16138)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


LOL what state would you pick to be turned into a battery? Montana perhaps, or maybe Illinois or Ohio?


Lake Roosevelt, in Washington State, is a ballast of water used to produce electricity. A LOT of electricity. This ballast is filled by nature, not by using a wind turbine. The Grand Coulee dam powerhouse supplies electrical power to a large area, and most of it is exported to the SOTC (since they refuse to produce their own power and depend almost entirely on imported power).

Montana is indeed part of a ballasting system that spreads down through North and South Dakota, Illinois, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. We call it the Missouri and the Mississippi river system.

Some of this is dammed and produces hydroelectric power, but this river system is not really conducive to the construction of dams. The land is too flat.

Waterwheels can be used though, and they do exist along this river in places.

We call it the Missouri river.


Dams are driving migratory fish species to extinction, not environmentally safe

Not a bit of it. Salmon routinely make it past several dams along the Columbia river to reach their spawning grounds. Fish farms also exist along that river. There really is plenty of salmon and trout.

Most rivers and streams do not have a dam on them.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
01-02-2021 01:46
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3658)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
AMinterx wrote:
I've read that wind power produces an electricity surplus at times of lower demand.

If that's the case (and I'm sorry if this is a stupid question) but can't that electricity be stored in large batteries until additional power is needed which will probably be just a few hours later?

P.S. Climate change deniers need not reply.


LOL what state would you pick to be turned into a battery? Montana perhaps, or maybe Illinois or Ohio?


Lake Roosevelt, in Washington State, is a ballast of water used to produce electricity. A LOT of electricity. This ballast is filled by nature, not by using a wind turbine. The Grand Coulee dam powerhouse supplies electrical power to a large area, and most of it is exported to the SOTC (since they refuse to produce their own power and depend almost entirely on imported power).

Montana is indeed part of a ballasting system that spreads down through North and South Dakota, Illinois, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. We call it the Missouri and the Mississippi river system.

Some of this is dammed and produces hydroelectric power, but this river system is not really conducive to the construction of dams. The land is too flat.

Waterwheels can be used though, and they do exist along this river in places.

We call it the Missouri river.


Dams are driving migratory fish species to extinction, not environmentally safe

Not a bit of it. Salmon routinely make it past several dams along the Columbia river to reach their spawning grounds. Fish farms also exist along that river. There really is plenty of salmon and trout.

Most rivers and streams do not have a dam on them.


They also have a thing, called 'fish ladders', which as it sounds, enable the fish to climb up, along side dams gradually. Dams also have barriers, to prevent fish from getting sucked in, and turned into seagull-sushi. They don't just build dams, and tough luck for the critters. They try to have minimal impact on the waterway. Lot of dams don't just generate electricity. They store water for the dry season. Some places get their tap water from the reservoirs.

Bonneville Dam, on the Columbia River, is a pretty cool tourist stop. They have fish hatcheries, fish ladders, and tours. Lot of places with under water windows, where you can watch it all work. John Day dam, a little further up, is suppose to be nice too, but never stopped there, just drove past many times.
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