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Rising sea levels attacking Florida coast, happening now!


Rising sea levels attacking Florida coast, happening now!17-10-2020 04:05
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
King tides are here: Higher than normal tides expected along East Florida Coast through the weekend

WHAT'S HAPPENING?
The moon has entered its new moon phase. During this time it will also be in its closest orbit to Earth, perigee. During this time, low tides are also expected to be lower than normal.
Expect the tides to be between 4 and 6 feet, at some points along the east coast of Florida. On average the high tide is about 3 feet.
High tide times occurring on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Sea level rise is also contributing to higher than normal tides. The mean sea level is typically higher in the summer due to changing weather patterns and increasing water temperatures.
This higher than normal tides could produce minor flooding along the coast and coastal erosion may occur.
THE WINDS WILL BE MODERATE TO STRONG AT TIMES
The winds will be shifting through the weekend, which will aid the push of water toward the coast. By Saturday, the winds will be from the northeast and then on Sunday from the east.


https://www.wftv.com/weather/eye-on-the-tropics/higher-than-normal-tides-expected-along-east-florida-coast-through-weekend/AWBQ5KLZQFHFFPFRAAIPG2OUZQ/

Guessing that this is just a weekend crisis. But the good news is that there will also be lower than normal, low tides, guess it sort of averages out. Guess it might be a good time to grab the metal detector, and head to the beach for some treasure hunting. Never know what washes up. Probably mostly bags of drugs, and they'll shut down the whole beach again, bastards...
17-10-2020 04:29
GasGuzzlerProfile picture★★★★☆
(1837)
So let me see if I can get this straight...

Higher than normal high tide due to strong east winds...and rising sea levels(I'm assuming this is a shameless "climate change" plug?)

Lower than normal low tide due to moon phase. WTF happened to the rising sea levels?

I've had a bad day, but seriously, how are people so F-ing stupid?

I suppose it along the same concept as "the Earth is warming so fast that it's frigid out".

The sea is rising SO fast that there are very low tides. WTF??!!
17-10-2020 04:40
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
GasGuzzler wrote:
So let me see if I can get this straight...

Higher than normal high tide due to strong east winds...and rising sea levels(I'm assuming this is a shameless "climate change" plug?)

Lower than normal low tide due to moon phase. WTF happened to the rising sea levels?

I've had a bad day, but seriously, how are people so F-ing stupid?

I suppose it along the same concept as "the Earth is warming so fast that it's frigid out".

The sea is rising SO fast that there are very low tides. WTF??!!



My posting of "hot" Australian actresses, you can understand. Yes? But you're clueless about gravity? And your post saying "gravity, really?" is allowed by the moderator because it illustrates that Americans are fücking stüpid.
Yet asking what "is" "hot" is deleted?
Question for you. Can you do the basic math in the attached image? It explains both high and low tide. It's kind of basic. But you're an American.
Yet no one answered my question. Tess or Claire?

This is like looking at a good lookin' woman, you know what you're seeing.
With Einstein, it's force might actually increase while Newton's work doesn't allow for that. In this aspect, to paraphrase Einstein, the closer you are to a good lookin' gal, the hotter it gets.

http://physics.weber.edu/amiri/physics1010online/WSUonline12w/OnLineCourseMovies/CircularMotion&Gravity/reviewofgravity/ReviewofGravity.html

With this formula, why does a satellite stay in orbit? This is the math they use. It's satellites allows for modern communications in America.

With Einstein, the gravitational attraction increases at a greater rate that what Newtonian gravity allows for.

Attached image:


Edited on 17-10-2020 04:52
17-10-2020 07:19
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
To get stupid on a simple subject, in calculus, a limit is never achieved but you can approach it. The closer you get to it, the more you change direction.
With gravity, between the Earth and the Moon, there is a limit where there is no gravity. As the Moon passes in it's orbit around the Earth, the limit of the Earth's gravitational field changes.
At any given time with a constant point between the Earth and the Moon, there is a defined gravitational constant. It's a point in space relative to both gravitational forces.
With gravity, Einstein posited that with the Earth's gravitational field, it's ability to move mass in space is twice as great as what Newton allowed for. His general theory is based on this.
And in math, there is the inverse square law. The proof of his theory might only have shown that the inverse square law applies to gravity as well.
And now we're back to who is hotter, Tess or Claire?
Claire has the hat on mate, righto?

p.s., it "IS" "HOT" in Australia. We now know what "IS" and "HOT" is. Right? It's in stereo matey!!!

And I do like the show so no stupid comments will be tolerated.
Attached image:


Edited on 17-10-2020 07:33
17-10-2020 09:50
Xadoman
★★☆☆☆
(297)
Good video about what causes tides. Most teachers explain it wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwChk4S99i4&t=396s&ab_channel=PBSSpaceTime
17-10-2020 13:52
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
The main take away, is that tides aren't like clockwork. Using whatever measurement method, there is no consistency. Some mathemagic needs to be applied, to smooth out some of the abnormalities, that happen frequently. Since the focus on 'rising sea levels', we can simply ignore the low tides. Imagine this years 'average sea level is alarming, considering the number of tropical storms we've had.
17-10-2020 22:25
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13487)
Xadoman wrote:
Good video about what causes tides. Most teachers explain it wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwChk4S99i4&t=396s&ab_channel=PBSSpaceTime


He didn't explain the cause of tides.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
17-10-2020 22:27
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13487)
HarveyH55 wrote:
The main take away, is that tides aren't like clockwork. Using whatever measurement method, there is no consistency. Some mathemagic needs to be applied, to smooth out some of the abnormalities, that happen frequently. Since the focus on 'rising sea levels', we can simply ignore the low tides. Imagine this years 'average sea level is alarming, considering the number of tropical storms we've had.


Actually tides are like clockwork. Even more accurate than our own clocks. The period is not 24 hours, and has effects that last some 22 years, so it's not normally considered a useful clock. But it IS a very accurate clock.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
17-10-2020 23:02
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
The main take away, is that tides aren't like clockwork. Using whatever measurement method, there is no consistency. Some mathemagic needs to be applied, to smooth out some of the abnormalities, that happen frequently. Since the focus on 'rising sea levels', we can simply ignore the low tides. Imagine this years 'average sea level is alarming, considering the number of tropical storms we've had.


Actually tides are like clockwork. Even more accurate than our own clocks. The period is not 24 hours, and has effects that last some 22 years, so it's not normally considered a useful clock. But it IS a very accurate clock.


The King Tide is a little different though, and will be at there worst this weekend only, until the next time. Don't happen like the daily tides either, lot of variation. Found it amusing, our 'rising sea levels' will last just the weekend...
18-10-2020 03:02
Xadoman
★★☆☆☆
(297)
Into the Night wrote:
Xadoman wrote:
Good video about what causes tides. Most teachers explain it wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwChk4S99i4&t=396s&ab_channel=PBSSpaceTime


He didn't explain the cause of tides.



He explained how most teachers got it wrong. Somewhat how most teacher also got it wrong how rainbows are formed.

Jeff Jo, MS Applied Mathematics, Washington University in St. Louis (1979)
Updated June 19, 2018:



A rainbow not only can be formed without total internal reflection (TIR), it is formed without TIR and cannot be formed with it.

While they may sound very plausible, many parts of the explanations you may have heard about how rainbows form are wrong in some way. Some are just stretches of the truth. Others are outright wrong, and TIR is one of these.
18-10-2020 03:56
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(634)
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess
18-10-2020 07:37
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.
18-10-2020 18:26
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.



And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.
18-10-2020 21:26
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
sow verb
\ ˈsō
\
sowed; sown\ ˈsōn
\ or sowed; sowing

Definition of sow

intransitive verb
1 : to plant seed for growth especially by scattering
2 : to set something in motion : begin an enterprise

18-10-2020 21:36
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.


Will your newly learned calculus, allow you to calculate the time, date, of the maximum tide level, and how high it will be, within an inch or so? King tides don't often cause any concern, but sometimes they can do bad things. The article over-hyped it a little, slight exaggeration in the 1-3 feet estimate as well.
And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.
18-10-2020 21:55
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.


Will your newly learned calculus, allow you to calculate the time, date, of the maximum tide level, and how high it will be, within an inch or so? King tides don't often cause any concern, but sometimes they can do bad things. The article over-hyped it a little, slight exaggeration in the 1-3 feet estimate as well.
And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.



I like the way you mixed your post with mine to confuse people. You don't seem to understand why the 1 - 3 foot estimate. The sea floor is not even. As a result it can change the flow of water.
18-10-2020 22:53
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.


Will your newly learned calculus, allow you to calculate the time, date, of the maximum tide level, and how high it will be, within an inch or so? King tides don't often cause any concern, but sometimes they can do bad things. The article over-hyped it a little, slight exaggeration in the 1-3 feet estimate as well.
And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.



I like the way you mixed your post with mine to confuse people. You don't seem to understand why the 1 - 3 foot estimate. The sea floor is not even. As a result it can change the flow of water.


Same uneven terrain, every day... I'm just curious, if there is a way to precisely predict when the best time to go out, shoot pictures of the cataclysmic rising sea level event. It's not generally a note-worthy event, hate to waste the time and expense, to stand on the beach, waiting for something, that will likely be less than spectacular. Have to drive about 45 minutes, in an SUV, just to get there.. Then there's parking... Anything near the beach, there's a parking meter to feed. Basically, you are telling me you can tell me the day of the next King Tide, but not the intensity...
19-10-2020 00:20
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.


Will your newly learned calculus, allow you to calculate the time, date, of the maximum tide level, and how high it will be, within an inch or so? King tides don't often cause any concern, but sometimes they can do bad things. The article over-hyped it a little, slight exaggeration in the 1-3 feet estimate as well.
And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.



I like the way you mixed your post with mine to confuse people. You don't seem to understand why the 1 - 3 foot estimate. The sea floor is not even. As a result it can change the flow of water.


Same uneven terrain, every day... I'm just curious, if there is a way to precisely predict when the best time to go out, shoot pictures of the cataclysmic rising sea level event. It's not generally a note-worthy event, hate to waste the time and expense, to stand on the beach, waiting for something, that will likely be less than spectacular. Have to drive about 45 minutes, in an SUV, just to get there.. Then there's parking... Anything near the beach, there's a parking meter to feed. Basically, you are telling me you can tell me the day of the next King Tide, but not the intensity...



What you're actually on about is where will the water levels be higher? You live in central Florida. You don't go to the beach. And yet you're concerned about something that will not affect you?
Myself, if you ever paid attention to what I'm on about, it's the ozone layer. I'm not that interested in predicting sea level rise 100 years for now.
With King Tides, if you actually did go to the beach, the riptides if caught in one could easily prove to be fatal. That'd be the real concern.
Here's a topographic elevation map of Florida. It seems that most of Florida is at least 16 feet above sea level. And you're worried about a King Tide? Sounds like a personal issue to me, sorry I can't help you there friend.

https://en-gb.topographic-map.com/maps/f5e4/Florida/
Attached image:

19-10-2020 00:21
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.


Will your newly learned calculus, allow you to calculate the time, date, of the maximum tide level, and how high it will be, within an inch or so? King tides don't often cause any concern, but sometimes they can do bad things. The article over-hyped it a little, slight exaggeration in the 1-3 feet estimate as well.
And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides. This would give us a chance to bond and would give me some real world experience on using trig identities. And besides, since I am a disabled Veteran that's handicapped, I'd be sowing that I don't think that I'm better than you.



I like the way you mixed your post with mine to confuse people. You don't seem to understand why the 1 - 3 foot estimate. The sea floor is not even. As a result it can change the flow of water.


Same uneven terrain, every day... I'm just curious, if there is a way to precisely predict when the best time to go out, shoot pictures of the cataclysmic rising sea level event. It's not generally a note-worthy event, hate to waste the time and expense, to stand on the beach, waiting for something, that will likely be less than spectacular. Have to drive about 45 minutes, in an SUV, just to get there.. Then there's parking... Anything near the beach, there's a parking meter to feed. Basically, you are telling me you can tell me the day of the next King Tide, but not the intensity...



What you're actually on about is where will the water levels be higher? You live in central Florida. You don't go to the beach. And yet you're concerned about something that will not affect you?
Myself, if you ever paid attention to what I'm on about, it's the ozone layer. I'm not that interested in predicting sea level rise 100 years from now.
With King Tides, if you actually did go to the beach, the riptides if caught in one could easily prove to be fatal. That'd be the real concern.
Here's a topographic elevation map of Florida. It seems that most of Florida is at least 16 feet above sea level. And you're worried about a King Tide? Sounds like a personal issue to me, sorry I can't help you there friend.

https://en-gb.topographic-map.com/maps/f5e4/Florida/
Attached image:


Edited on 19-10-2020 00:25
19-10-2020 00:41
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
Why does anything of interest, need to be cause for worry? The only worry about hurricanes, is how much crap I have to clean up, and what sort of changes they made at work. They are a slight inconvenience, a little more work, but I have no worries about surviving them. King Tides aren't such a big deal either, more impressive headlines most of the times. It would be a cool photo-op though, considering all the rising sea level stories.
19-10-2020 02:00
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13487)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
The main take away, is that tides aren't like clockwork. Using whatever measurement method, there is no consistency. Some mathemagic needs to be applied, to smooth out some of the abnormalities, that happen frequently. Since the focus on 'rising sea levels', we can simply ignore the low tides. Imagine this years 'average sea level is alarming, considering the number of tropical storms we've had.


Actually tides are like clockwork. Even more accurate than our own clocks. The period is not 24 hours, and has effects that last some 22 years, so it's not normally considered a useful clock. But it IS a very accurate clock.


The King Tide is a little different though, and will be at there worst this weekend only, until the next time. Don't happen like the daily tides either, lot of variation. Found it amusing, our 'rising sea levels' will last just the weekend...


Since barometric pressure can affect the local sea level (and the tide), the so-called King Tide (a subjective term) occurs with all the regularity of the local weather.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
19-10-2020 02:11
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13487)
Xadoman wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Xadoman wrote:
Good video about what causes tides. Most teachers explain it wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwChk4S99i4&t=396s&ab_channel=PBSSpaceTime


He didn't explain the cause of tides.



He explained how most teachers got it wrong.

Nope. He didn't explain that either. He doesn't get to speak for most teachers. He only gets to speak for himself.
Xadoman wrote:
Somewhat how most teacher also got it wrong how rainbows are formed.

He doesn't get to speak for most teachers. He only gets to speak for himself.
Xadoman wrote:
[quote]Jeff Jo, MS Applied Mathematics, Washington University in St. Louis (1979)
Updated June 19, 2018:



A rainbow not only can be formed without total internal reflection (TIR), it is formed without TIR and cannot be formed with it.

A rainbow (or a glory) requires outside light to enter a water droplet (or prism). It cannot form it's own light completely internally. You cannot create energy out of nothing.

Light is refracted, reflected, and refracted again.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
19-10-2020 02:16
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13487)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
Tidal predictions are accurate and can be made for a year ahead weather is unpredictable and you can only take a guess


We can predict the tides, but we can't predict how high they will go, or how low. This weekend is King Tides, which don't happen every day. Usually no big deal, but the unusually high tides occasional cause the rivers to backup a little, which also rise some. Fortunately we aren't having any severe storm weather, should be any flooding. The King Tides have come at some really inconvenient times in the past, and storm water was a little slow to drain.



And yet they happen when the Earth is closest to the Sun. What a strange coincidence. Maybe that's because the Sun's gravitation effect on the Earth is greater? And if so, where is the Moon in all of this?
Pretty much any high tide of the day can be a King Tide. That is a result of the weather, not the Moon or the Sun.
James___ wrote:
If you'd like, I can teach you the math so you'll be able to calculate King Tides.
There is no calculation for King Tides.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
19-10-2020 02:33
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(634)
Did anything happen in Florida
19-10-2020 04:21
James___
★★★★★
(3286)
duncan61 wrote:
Did anything happen in Florida



I wonder what he's going to the beach for when he lives inland. Nothing but scantily clad girls and guys there. He must be doing research. Yep, that's it, he's doing "research".

And they'll be wearing a lot less.

He did say it makes for a nice photo op.

Edited on 19-10-2020 04:41
19-10-2020 10:58
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2543)
duncan61 wrote:
Did anything happen in Florida


Apparently nothing newsworthy this time either... It makes the news about as often as jellyfish swarms and algae blooms.




Join the debate Rising sea levels attacking Florida coast, happening now!:

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