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National Geographic considers CO2 as a pollutant (not considered so internationally)


National Geographic considers CO2 as a pollutant (not considered so internationally)24-02-2019 04:41
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1085)
What is air pollution?

Air pollution is a mix of particles and gases that can reach harmful concentrations both outside and indoors. Its effects can range from higher disease risks to rising temperatures. Soot, smoke, mold, pollen, methane, and carbon dioxide are a just few examples of common pollutants.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/pollution/
24-02-2019 19:19
Wake
★★★★★
(4031)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
What is air pollution?

Air pollution is a mix of particles and gases that can reach harmful concentrations both outside and indoors. Its effects can range from higher disease risks to rising temperatures. Soot, smoke, mold, pollen, methane, and carbon dioxide are a just few examples of common pollutants.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/pollution/

The common science magazines such as National Geographic have lost all credibility and anyone that would accept anything including the spatial relationship of Laos to the rest of the world from them would be crazy.
24-02-2019 22:51
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13990)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
What is air pollution?

Air pollution is a mix of particles and gases that can reach harmful concentrations both outside and indoors. Its effects can range from higher disease risks to rising temperatures. Soot, smoke, mold, pollen, methane, and carbon dioxide are a just few examples of common pollutants.

...deleted Holy Link...

Soot IS smoke. They are one and the same. The only difference is one is attached to a surface (soot) and the other is suspended in air (smoke). They are unburned fuel. The presence of soot (or smoke) indicates a waste of fuel. They do not cause disease or cause temperatures to rise (unless it catches fire! Yes, they are carbon. They burn).

Molds are a natural living thing. Some are toxic to us, but all are a necessary part of life on Earth. They break down dead plants and other organic matter for reuse.

Pollen is plant sex. You don't get many plants without it. It's also food, both for bees and for us.

Methane is a naturally occurring gas. It can be found with oil, generated by bacteria (especially those that like swamp water!), and can be generated by interaction of sunlight with air containing carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

Carbon dioxide is a naturally occurring gas. It is found pretty much anywhere, even underground. It is critical for plant life to function as plants combine carbon dioxide with water to produce carbohydrates. Food (both for us and the plant).

A pollutant isn't simply a material. None of these are pollutants in and of themselves.

This is a clear case of the National Geographic not understanding this.


So what IS a pollutant? What makes a pollutant a pollutant? Any material can be a pollutant, so just what IS a pollutant anyway?

A pollutant is a contaminant. Nothing more. The dust in a house is a pollutant, because it makes a dirty house. Outside it is simply dirt...harmless. We clean our houses because dust and dirt in them is a pollutant. We don't want it in our homes.

Methane is natural gas. It has no odor. The odor you smell from natural gas appliances is an odorant added specifically to detect possible explosion risks in the home. It stinks. We remove it by ventilating the home before lighting a match because it has become a pollutant (and a potentially dangerous one!). BTW, the odor you smell in the swamp isn't the methane, it's the rot.

If nuclear material is allowed to enter the sea, it may become a pollutant to the local area around there. It's potentially hazardous levels of radiation may harm anyone in the area. As it dilutes, those levels of radiation correspondingly drop.

The solution to pollution is dilution. Move the dust outside. Let the smoke dissipate. Let the pollen season do it's thing and pass. Swab out the harmful molds from your home (some molds are beneficial!). Dilute a nuclear materials spill into the ocean.

Some materials, like barium or chlorine, are toxic to us in small quantities. Simply dumping them elsewhere does not remove their toxicity. In these cases, we allow them to react to harmless salts, and they can be safely disposed of. While spilling things like barium or mercury is bad, they can be cleaned up and in some cases simply allowed to dissipate. Barium is kind of nasty, and it is better to convert it to a harmless salt. Mercury occurs naturally in the environment. Sodium chloride (a salt of chlorine) is table salt. It naturally occurs. Barium chloride is also a low energy salt, safe for the environment.

Sometimes the contamination can be very tiny to cause real problems. Allowing potassium chlorate to come contact with very small amounts of sulfur can cause an unexpected explosion! Any sulfur in the area is a contaminant (a pollutant) and needs to be completely removed, OR the potassium chlorate is the pollutant and needs to be completely removed.

Dissipate the contamination, move it to where it is not harmful (and no longer a contamination), convert it to a benign substance and move that outside, and you have solved your pollution problem.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 24-02-2019 22:52




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