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Maximizing Carbon Sequestration in Wetlands



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08-05-2024 23:01
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
Deliberate Massive Erosion in Dark Ages Italy.

During the "Dark Ages", after the fall of the Roman Empire, people deliberately caused massive erosion in some of the hilly regions of Italy.

They would build a small dam at the outlet of a small valley.

They would cut down all the trees on the hillsides upstream.

Let the fuel get nice and dry, then torch it.

The next big rainfall event would fill the small valley with nutrient rich sediment.

The valley became HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE cropland.

What could possibly be wrong with this picture?

As Europe emerged from the Dark Ages, they didn't even need to pass any laws for environmental regulation to stop the large scale slash and burn operations.

Deliberate Massive Erosion in Dark Ages Italy. People figured out it was bad
08-05-2024 23:02
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
Rice Paddies and Anabaena azollae Cyanobacteria.

Humans have terraformed by constructing rice paddies, for thousands of years.

These agroecosystems sustained productivity without anthropogenic inputs of agricultural chemicals, for thousands of years.

A large, coordinated social network was required to maintain the system of dikes and canals. This made people work together under a central government.

One reason these rice paddies work so well is due to the presence of azolla water ferns.

The aquatic azolla fern lives in symbiosis with a nitrogen fixing bacteria, Anabaena azollae.

This "blue green algae" is also photosynthetic, like the fern it lives with.

Atmospheric nitrogen can be "fixed" by these cyanobacteria, into a form that eventually becomes bioavailable to the rice in the paddies.

It costs a lot of energy to "fix" nitrogen. Legumes have to provide carbohydrate to the nitrogen fixing bacteria in the nodules on their roots to be able to do it.

These water ferns and their bacterial partners make rice production possible without humans having to apply nitrogen fertilizer.

Rice paddies take a lot of work to build.

Perhaps the most impressive can be found on steep mountain slopes of Bali.

Far more difficult to build than the rice paddies of Southeast Asian deltas, these are on steep hillsides.

It would have been much easier to build them on lower land, irrigated with river water.

But the groundwater on the slopes of these mountains in Bali is special.

It is highly enriched in phosphorus.

It was worth the effort to build the rice paddy infrastructure with such fertile water coming in.

Because they also have the azolla fern with its cyanobacteria to supply nitrogen.
08-05-2024 23:05
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)

All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3.



Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. High rates of photosynthesis sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.
09-05-2024 08:18
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
sealover wrote:

All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3.

Stop spamming. Carbon isn't organic. Draining a wetland means it's not a wetland. Carbon is not carbon dioxide.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
09-05-2024 19:05
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3, and continuing on to page 4.


Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. High rates of photosynthesis sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.
10-05-2024 00:10
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
sealover wrote:
[b]All the


Repetition fallacy (spamming). Stop spamming.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
11-05-2024 04:53
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3, and continuing on to page 4.


Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. High rates of photosynthesis sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.


"sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist who has published widely cited research about carbon cycling, and performed extensive biogeochemistry investigations in wetlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
11-05-2024 06:51
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14537)
sealover wrote: Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems.

Aren't farms the most productive?

sealover wrote: High rates of photosynthesis sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass.

On farms, high rates of photosynthesis sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become crops that people buy.
11-05-2024 08:00
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3, and continuing on to page 4.


Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. Net Primary Production (NPP) is a measure of how much carbon dioxide is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, per unit area, per unit time. Wetlands rank up there with tropical rainforests and coral reefs for the highest NPP, perhaps outranked only by seagrass beds. Wetlands NPP is far higher than that of croplands.

High rates of photosynthesis in wetlands sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.


"sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist who has published widely cited research about carbon cycling, and performed extensive biogeochemistry investigations in wetlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
11-05-2024 18:49
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
sealover wrote:
Wetlands are ...

Wetlands are ...


Stop spamming.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
13-05-2024 19:55
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3, and continuing on to page 4.


Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. Net Primary Production (NPP) is a measure of how much carbon dioxide is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, per unit area, per unit time. Wetlands rank up there with tropical rainforests and coral reefs for the highest NPP, perhaps outranked only by seagrass beds. Wetlands NPP is far higher than that of croplands.

High rates of photosynthesis in wetlands sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.


"sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist who has published widely cited research about carbon cycling, and performed extensive biogeochemistry investigations in wetlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
13-05-2024 21:35
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
Carbon isn't organic. Stop spamming.
18-05-2024 11:44
sealover
★★★★☆
(1601)
All the most relevant posts of this thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down on page 3, and continuing on to page 4.


Wetlands are among the world's most productive ecosystems. Net Primary Production (NPP) is a measure of how much carbon dioxide is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, per unit area, per unit time. Wetlands rank up there with tropical rainforests and coral reefs for the highest NPP, perhaps outranked only by seagrass beds. Wetlands NPP is far higher than that of croplands.

High rates of photosynthesis in wetlands sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide to become organic carbon in the live biomass. Waterlogged wetland soils create low oxygen conditions that prevent aerobic decomposition of organic carbon in dead biomass. Wetland soil organic matter has centuries long mean residence time, piling up year after year.

Undisturbed wetlands act as a net sink for carbon, sequestering more of it from the atmosphere than they emit by respiration or decomposition.

When wetlands are drained, stored organic carbon is exposed to oxygen and aerobic decomposition. Drained wetlands act as a net source for carbon, emitting more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than they sequester from it. Indeed, they emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at a rate orders of magnitude higher than the rate at which they sequester it.


"sealover" is a PhD biogeochemist who has published widely cited research about carbon cycling, and performed extensive biogeochemistry investigations in wetlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
[/quote]

Relevant posts of thread are compiled, beginning 3/4 way down page 3
18-05-2024 23:59
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
Carbon isn't organic. Stop spamming.
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