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hurricanes and cyclones


hurricanes and cyclones25-04-2020 12:43
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Australian Government - Bureau of Meteorology

Bureau Home > Australia > Western Australia > Forecasts > Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region

Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region
IDW10800

Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region
Issued at 2:00 pm WST on Saturday 25 April 2020
for the period until midnight WST Tuesday 28 April 2020.

Existing Cyclones in the Western Region:
Nil.

Potential Cyclones:

There are no significant tropical systems in the region and none are expected to develop in the next three days.


Likelihood of a tropical cyclone in the Western Region on:
Sunday:Very Low
Monday:Very Low
Tuesday:Very Low



NOTES: The likelihood is an estimate of the chance of each system being a tropical cyclone in the Region for each day.
Very Low:less than 5%Low:5% to 20%
Moderate:20 to 50%High
ver 50%
The Western Region refers to the Indian Ocean between Longitudes 90-125E and south of 10S.

Further information on Tropical Cyclones

I am going to follow the cyclone season this year to see if they are going to be more intense
25-04-2020 13:07
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Found this gem on the BOM site on cyclones yet the ABC is reporting that cyclones are increasing by 10% because of global warming.Where do they get off lying all the time

Long-term frequency
Trends in tropical cyclone activity in the Australian region (south of equator; 105-160°E) show that the total number of cyclones has decreased in recent decades (see graph). This decrease may partly be due to an improved discrimination between tropical cyclones and sub-cyclone intensity tropical lows. If weak cyclones are excluded from the analysis, the trend is more gradual and follows the downward trend in the Southern Oscillation Index suggesting that the decrease in cyclone numbers may be related to the greater number of El Niño events since the mid-1970s. However, the number of severe cyclones has increased and this does not appear to be due to improved discrimination between cyclones or trends in the Southern Oscillation Index. The actual cause of this is unknown.

According to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), tropical cyclone activity has risen in the northwest Pacific and north Atlantic since 1950. However, there has been little change in the number of very strong typhoon-force or hurricane-force systems. There has been little change in the number of tropical cyclones in the north Indian Ocean, southwest Indian Ocean and southwest Pacific Ocean east of 160°E.

Despite advances in computer modelling of the global climate using various scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions, making projections of how tropical cyclones may change in frequency and intensity remains a significant challenge. Since tropical cyclone activity is modulated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), projections of cyclone frequency will partly depend on the projections of future ENSOs. It is uncertain how ENSO will change in a warmer world. Some studies have suggested that peak winds in cyclones may increase by 5-10 % and peak rainfall rates may rise by 20-30 %. For more details see Climate Change in Australia (Chapter 5.9.1).


Tropical Cyclones
Cyclone Outlooks
Cyclone Knowledge Centre
MetEye
25-04-2020 17:50
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
I've lived in Florida, about 35 years now, and have experience quite a few hurricanes over the years. Little choice each year, to keep an eye on the weather, follow storm developments. They put a lot into it, at the weather stations, and don't always get it right. It's a day-to-day developing story, changing often. I think the IPCC is full of BS, on their predictions. We have fewer storms, and fewer monsters. The weather service puts out a list of 22 names for the storms each year. We don't come even close to running through the list. Even when they started naming sub-tropical storms a few years ago. They really haven't the tools or understanding to predict where and when a hurricane develops. Nor can they predict the path, or how fast it will move. Basically, all we really do, is observe, and make guesses, based on past experiences.
26-04-2020 03:12
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
I followed a few from the 70s-80s and they are extremely random.A low pressure system develops and it goes from there.A lot of our North west coast is uninhabited so there is not always damage but lots of rain.I was hoping you would weigh in Harvey.Do you think the alarmists will drop the extreme weather claims now??Perhaps when we all flood out
26-04-2020 04:56
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
duncan61 wrote:
I followed a few from the 70s-80s and they are extremely random.A low pressure system develops and it goes from there.A lot of our North west coast is uninhabited so there is not always damage but lots of rain.I was hoping you would weigh in Harvey.Do you think the alarmists will drop the extreme weather claims now??Perhaps when we all flood out


We don't get as much damage as the media implies. Hurricanes lose a lot of force, when they make landfall, which is usually where the bulk of the damage occurs. The flooding along the coast, is mostly storm surge, brought in with the hurricane. We have pretty good storm water management, but it requires a lot of continual cleaning and maintenance, which costs money. Most counties take care of it well, since we get a lot of rain, quickly during our rainy-season, which runs along side hurricane season. During the warm summer, we get warm, water saturated winds blowing in from the gulf of mexico, west, and off the atlantic on the east. When these meet, strong storms develop quickly, and dump a lot of rain. Flooding is possible on a daily basis, if the storm water has no place to go, quickly. We don't get much in the way of freezing weather, so vegetation grows quickly, clogging ditches and canals. There are also buried, huge pipes, that get clogged with leaves, debis, and trash. Some areas clean out the drain system regularly, whether it's actually needed or not. Others wait, until they see signs of blockage, before cleaning them out. Big difference, when a big storm comes through, since you can clear the clogs, until afterwards. Now, many of the other states, frequently in the path, don't manage storm water very well, since it's usually rare to actually get hit with a storm, full force. They'd rather spend the money on other things, and rely on insurance, and federal disaster relief to bail them out, if there is flood damage.

Hurricanes are no joke, but they don't really do the wide spread damage the news media implies. The storms carry a lot of water, and strong winds, that extend over 200 miles wide. They are usually kind of slow moving, so you are under their influence for hours (6-12 hours). Lot of wind and rain, that comes in waves, squall lines. One kind of cool thing, though not really worth going through a storm like that. Is when the eye of the storm passes over your city. The rain stops, the winds die down, even some sunlight. Lasts 30-40 minutes, almost thing the storm is over. Then it starts up again. Sort of just a half time show. It's just long enough to take the dog out for a walk, and see what kind of damage there is so far. Damage, is usually leaves, fallen limbs, occasionally a few trees fall over. We use to get utility poles snapping off, or blown over, as they were wood, either old an rotted, or not buried deep enough, and the ground had been saturated for a while before the hurricane. We've buried a lot of the cables, or replace the wood, with concrete.
26-04-2020 06:04
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/03/hurricanes-to-deliver-a-bigger-punch-to-coasts/

Check out this pile of misinformation posted by Tai Hai Chen which had no replies.The next thing on my agenda is to find out why stuff like this is written.Its all possibly,maybe,could have.There are dumb people out there that believe this stuff
23-05-2020 04:47
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Here we go team.The weather for the last 2 weeks has been typical Autumn in the west.Cold mornings under 10 degrees but warming to mid 20s during the day.Sunny skys no clouds and light winds.A tropical low is developing in the Nth West and the cold front from the South is going to collide with it and it could develop in to a big blow off.It could also fizzle out like they do.If it does do damage you can bet the Warmazombies will be all over it as evidence if it fades out no one will care or comment.I will be tracking it out of personel interest
23-05-2020 04:51
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Details of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Mangga at 12:30 am CCT:
Intensity: tropical low, sustained winds near the centre of 55 kilometres per hour with wind gusts to 85 kilometres per hour.
Location: within 75 kilometres of 14.1 degrees South, 96.1 degrees East , 225 kilometres south southwest of Cocos Island .
Movement: southeast at 30 kilometres per hour .

Mangga has weakened below tropical cyclone strength and is moving away from the Cocos Keeling Islands.


Hazards:
GALES are no longer expected to affect the Cocos Keeling Islands. Heavy rainfall is now also less likely.


Recommended Action:
The Australian Federal Police advise of a BLUE ALERT for the Cocos Keeling Islands. Communities on Home and West Islands need to prepare for cyclonic weather and organise an emergency kit including first aid kit, torch, portable radio, spare batteries, food and water.

looks like its fading out
23-05-2020 06:28
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
We get those dire warnings a lot too in Florida. They encourage people to stock up on emergency supplies, even though most people will already have everything they need. Most people get caught up in the hype, and buy all they can, failing to realize they can't take most of it with them, if it gets bad, and they need to evacuate. Even after a big storm, few people go more than 2-3 days, with no means of getting supplies. Power might be out, for some, for weeks, but it's a short drive to where power has been restored. Mostly, the hype gets people to watch the news programs closely, improves their ratings and revenue. Getting people out, spending money, is good for the local businesses, and economy. It's good to be informed, and prepared, but they go overboard, and exploit any storm potential. I've survived about 35 years of Florida severe weather, never evacuated. Same house for 30 years, no major damage. I'm just not seeing an increase threat. Gotten milder, if anything over the years. The trend is that people rebuild cheap. They have insurance, the get disaster relief money, and know that if they get a direct hit again, it doesn't make a huge difference, unless they spend a lot of money on building something that will hold up. In which cases, they don't get the free money. They have to pay high insurance premiums, because the property value is increased.
23-05-2020 19:20
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
duncan61 wrote:
Australian Government - Bureau of Meteorology

Bureau Home > Australia > Western Australia > Forecasts > Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region

Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region
IDW10800

Tropical Cyclone Outlook for the Western Region
Issued at 2:00 pm WST on Saturday 25 April 2020
for the period until midnight WST Tuesday 28 April 2020.

Existing Cyclones in the Western Region:
Nil.

Potential Cyclones:

There are no significant tropical systems in the region and none are expected to develop in the next three days.


Likelihood of a tropical cyclone in the Western Region on:
Sunday:Very Low
Monday:Very Low
Tuesday:Very Low



NOTES: The likelihood is an estimate of the chance of each system being a tropical cyclone in the Region for each day.
Very Low:less than 5%Low:5% to 20%
Moderate:20 to 50%High
ver 50%
The Western Region refers to the Indian Ocean between Longitudes 90-125E and south of 10S.

Further information on Tropical Cyclones

I am going to follow the cyclone season this year to see if they are going to be more intense

Might be useful to put this on Politiplex in reference form, IBdaMann.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
23-05-2020 19:21
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
At 2pm AWST Saturday, Ex-Tropical Cyclone Mangga [17U] was located near 16S 99E, about 460 kilometres southeast of the Cocosand Keeling Islands. The remnants of the system will move rapidly towards northwest WA and will not redevelop.

There are no other significant lows in the Western Region at present and none are expected to develop over the next three days.

It died
23-05-2020 19:21
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
duncan61 wrote:
Found this gem on the BOM site on cyclones yet the ABC is reporting that cyclones are increasing by 10% because of global warming.Where do they get off lying all the time

Long-term frequency
Trends in tropical cyclone activity in the Australian region (south of equator; 105-160°E) show that the total number of cyclones has decreased in recent decades (see graph). This decrease may partly be due to an improved discrimination between tropical cyclones and sub-cyclone intensity tropical lows. If weak cyclones are excluded from the analysis, the trend is more gradual and follows the downward trend in the Southern Oscillation Index suggesting that the decrease in cyclone numbers may be related to the greater number of El Niño events since the mid-1970s. However, the number of severe cyclones has increased and this does not appear to be due to improved discrimination between cyclones or trends in the Southern Oscillation Index. The actual cause of this is unknown.

According to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), tropical cyclone activity has risen in the northwest Pacific and north Atlantic since 1950. However, there has been little change in the number of very strong typhoon-force or hurricane-force systems. There has been little change in the number of tropical cyclones in the north Indian Ocean, southwest Indian Ocean and southwest Pacific Ocean east of 160°E.

Despite advances in computer modelling of the global climate using various scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions, making projections of how tropical cyclones may change in frequency and intensity remains a significant challenge. Since tropical cyclone activity is modulated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), projections of cyclone frequency will partly depend on the projections of future ENSOs. It is uncertain how ENSO will change in a warmer world. Some studies have suggested that peak winds in cyclones may increase by 5-10 % and peak rainfall rates may rise by 20-30 %. For more details see Climate Change in Australia (Chapter 5.9.1).


Tropical Cyclones
Cyclone Outlooks
Cyclone Knowledge Centre
MetEye

We're tired of the lying all the time too. Some reporters are getting to feel unsafe on the streets around here. Not any question as to why. The anger against the fake news has been building long before Trump.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
23-05-2020 19:24
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I've lived in Florida, about 35 years now, and have experience quite a few hurricanes over the years. Little choice each year, to keep an eye on the weather, follow storm developments. They put a lot into it, at the weather stations, and don't always get it right. It's a day-to-day developing story, changing often. I think the IPCC is full of BS, on their predictions. We have fewer storms, and fewer monsters. The weather service puts out a list of 22 names for the storms each year. We don't come even close to running through the list. Even when they started naming sub-tropical storms a few years ago. They really haven't the tools or understanding to predict where and when a hurricane develops. Nor can they predict the path, or how fast it will move. Basically, all we really do, is observe, and make guesses, based on past experiences.

...and then log the measurements of each one, at the National Hurricane Center...located right there in Florida.

According to their records, there has been no significant increase or decrease of hurricane activity or intensity for decades and decades, going back to when they started flying planes into hurricanes to measure them. (Any data logged before that was essentially guesswork and estimates, based on the damage caused.)


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
23-05-2020 19:29
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
HarveyH55 wrote:
duncan61 wrote:
I followed a few from the 70s-80s and they are extremely random.A low pressure system develops and it goes from there.A lot of our North west coast is uninhabited so there is not always damage but lots of rain.I was hoping you would weigh in Harvey.Do you think the alarmists will drop the extreme weather claims now??Perhaps when we all flood out


We don't get as much damage as the media implies. Hurricanes lose a lot of force, when they make landfall, which is usually where the bulk of the damage occurs. The flooding along the coast, is mostly storm surge, brought in with the hurricane. We have pretty good storm water management, but it requires a lot of continual cleaning and maintenance, which costs money. Most counties take care of it well, since we get a lot of rain, quickly during our rainy-season, which runs along side hurricane season. During the warm summer, we get warm, water saturated winds blowing in from the gulf of mexico, west, and off the atlantic on the east. When these meet, strong storms develop quickly, and dump a lot of rain. Flooding is possible on a daily basis, if the storm water has no place to go, quickly. We don't get much in the way of freezing weather, so vegetation grows quickly, clogging ditches and canals. There are also buried, huge pipes, that get clogged with leaves, debis, and trash. Some areas clean out the drain system regularly, whether it's actually needed or not. Others wait, until they see signs of blockage, before cleaning them out. Big difference, when a big storm comes through, since you can clear the clogs, until afterwards. Now, many of the other states, frequently in the path, don't manage storm water very well, since it's usually rare to actually get hit with a storm, full force. They'd rather spend the money on other things, and rely on insurance, and federal disaster relief to bail them out, if there is flood damage.

Hurricanes are no joke, but they don't really do the wide spread damage the news media implies. The storms carry a lot of water, and strong winds, that extend over 200 miles wide. They are usually kind of slow moving, so you are under their influence for hours (6-12 hours). Lot of wind and rain, that comes in waves, squall lines. One kind of cool thing, though not really worth going through a storm like that. Is when the eye of the storm passes over your city. The rain stops, the winds die down, even some sunlight. Lasts 30-40 minutes, almost thing the storm is over. Then it starts up again. Sort of just a half time show. It's just long enough to take the dog out for a walk, and see what kind of damage there is so far. Damage, is usually leaves, fallen limbs, occasionally a few trees fall over. We use to get utility poles snapping off, or blown over, as they were wood, either old an rotted, or not buried deep enough, and the ground had been saturated for a while before the hurricane. We've buried a lot of the cables, or replace the wood, with concrete.


Yeah. The news media did the same thing the last time we had an ice storm here.

Knocked down some trees and limbs, caused the high tension electrical system to be wrecked here where I live (about 10 miles of line were down) and it had to be rebuilt (done in a week), and a few idiots went out and wrecked their cars (people don't know how to handle ice and snow around here). The news media described it as 'an apocalypse'.

I assure you, Jesus did not come back yet (at least around here), and no zombies appeared (other than the usual ones at Starbucks in the morning).


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
24-05-2020 00:17
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces. It rains all the time, roads a slippery anytime of the year, worse in the winter. What learned driving in Oregon, still works when driving in Florida. I've had a few wild moments, but stayed on the road, regained control easy.
24-05-2020 00:23
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(7263)
HarveyH55 wrote: I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces.

They get many people escaping from Los Angeles ... who haven't the vaguest clue what a slippery surface even is.


.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
25-05-2020 03:52
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
The Unprecedented weather event.Yes that word was used did not happen we have had some wind and a little rain.About half of what was forecast
25-05-2020 04:56
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
duncan61 wrote:
The Unprecedented weather event.Yes that word was used did not happen we have had some wind and a little rain.About half of what was forecast


Well, it was unprecedented in the space of the couple of minutes for the rain to start, wasn't it? After all, it wasn't raining yet!



The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 25-05-2020 04:57
26-05-2020 16:50
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★☆
(1069)
Into the Night wrote:
....... and no zombies appeared (other than the usual ones at Starbucks in the morning).


Zombies (akin to the ones you describe) tend to make a mass appearance for every "Black Friday Sale" at electronics stores across the country, such as Best Buy (as well as other stores which happen to sell some electronics, such as Walmart). Book stores are generally not affected by such zombies, as they might accidentally learn something.
Edited on 26-05-2020 16:53
26-05-2020 16:59
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(7263)
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
....... and no zombies appeared (other than the usual ones at Starbucks in the morning).


Zombies (akin to the ones you describe) tend to make a mass appearance for every "Black Friday Sale" at electronics stores across the country, such as Best Buy (as well as other stores which happen to sell some electronics, such as Walmart). Book stores are generally not affected by such zombies, as they might accidentally learn something.


Just remember, zombies never socially-distance. It's a herd mentality thing.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
26-05-2020 17:06
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★☆
(1069)
IBdaMann wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote: I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces.

They get many people escaping from Los Angeles ... who haven't the vaguest clue what a slippery surface even is.


.

Even here in Wisconsin, where people oughta know better, they don't. There are many accidents when the first snowfall comes through, and people don't seem to learn how to drive on slippery surfaces until Winter is about over with. Then it's rinse/wash/repeat for next Winter.
26-05-2020 23:37
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
gfm7175 wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote: I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces.

They get many people escaping from Los Angeles ... who haven't the vaguest clue what a slippery surface even is.


.

Even here in Wisconsin, where people oughta know better, they don't. There are many accidents when the first snowfall comes through, and people don't seem to learn how to drive on slippery surfaces until Winter is about over with. Then it's rinse/wash/repeat for next Winter.



Really ought to be part of getting a license to drive. When I was a senior in high school, friend mine's dad got him a Chevy Malibu to destroy/learn with, then he could get anything he could afford. We of course tried our best to speed that up. We use to go to Portland Meadows (horse racing) parking lot, which was mostly paved, and no lamps, islands, or anything else. Just a huge parking lot. Use to do all kinds of crazy maneuvers, sliding around, spins. GEt up some speed, and slam on the breaks. Cheap thrills at the time, but we learned to control it pretty good. We don't get the ice and snow, but the roads get slick from the oil and crap, first half hour of rain. Standing water, or when ditches overflow is where I usually see a little excitement, but never got into any trouble dealing with it, even with bald tires. I really need a new set, but the place I usually go, doesn't seem to be open, when I drive be that way. The have decent tires, at reasonable price. Most of the other places sell high dollar brands. The mexican place sell off brands, probably Chinese. Most are real expensive, but I'm not sure if they'll last. not to mention you have to check their work. No weights on any of them, seems like unlikely they got balanced. Lugnuts missing, or not real snug either. My younger brother likes them, but he always buys used tires. Sells the rims off some of the cars he scraps there.
27-05-2020 00:47
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★☆
(1069)
HarveyH55 wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote: I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces.

They get many people escaping from Los Angeles ... who haven't the vaguest clue what a slippery surface even is.


.

Even here in Wisconsin, where people oughta know better, they don't. There are many accidents when the first snowfall comes through, and people don't seem to learn how to drive on slippery surfaces until Winter is about over with. Then it's rinse/wash/repeat for next Winter.



Really ought to be part of getting a license to drive. When I was a senior in high school, friend mine's dad got him a Chevy Malibu to destroy/learn with, then he could get anything he could afford. We of course tried our best to speed that up. We use to go to Portland Meadows (horse racing) parking lot, which was mostly paved, and no lamps, islands, or anything else. Just a huge parking lot. Use to do all kinds of crazy maneuvers, sliding around, spins. GEt up some speed, and slam on the breaks. Cheap thrills at the time, but we learned to control it pretty good. We don't get the ice and snow, but the roads get slick from the oil and crap, first half hour of rain. Standing water, or when ditches overflow is where I usually see a little excitement, but never got into any trouble dealing with it, even with bald tires. I really need a new set, but the place I usually go, doesn't seem to be open, when I drive be that way. The have decent tires, at reasonable price. Most of the other places sell high dollar brands. The mexican place sell off brands, probably Chinese. Most are real expensive, but I'm not sure if they'll last. not to mention you have to check their work. No weights on any of them, seems like unlikely they got balanced. Lugnuts missing, or not real snug either. My younger brother likes them, but he always buys used tires. Sells the rims off some of the cars he scraps there.

Good deal! My dad had me practice in parking lots as well, but I also got to play around in snowy/icy parking lots, and got to practice corrective maneuvering for such situations. Practice goes a long way!
27-05-2020 04:13
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(12944)
gfm7175 wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote: I'm not sure how anyone living in the Northwest, could not learn how to drive on slippery surfaces.

They get many people escaping from Los Angeles ... who haven't the vaguest clue what a slippery surface even is.


.

Even here in Wisconsin, where people oughta know better, they don't. There are many accidents when the first snowfall comes through, and people don't seem to learn how to drive on slippery surfaces until Winter is about over with. Then it's rinse/wash/repeat for next Winter.


It's the education of the new people in town that you are seeing.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
30-07-2020 16:27
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Just read an article from 28/7/2020 that it is going to be a big season for cyclones in Florida.Keep us posted Harvey apparently there has been 6 tropical storms already
30-07-2020 20:53
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
duncan61 wrote:
Just read an article from 28/7/2020 that it is going to be a big season for cyclones in Florida.Keep us posted Harvey apparently there has been 6 tropical storms already


Yeah, Saturday and Sunday are suppose to be Hurricane climate change. I don't think it's going to be even a tropical storm, by the time it gets past the islands. It's still a few weeks from when the real storms usually start sparking up. The name sub-tropical storms now, little misleading. This one made it all the way from Africa, and only barely made it to tropical depression. Not sure if they officially declared it a Tropical storm, yet. It's very weak, and fast forward moving. Won't pick up much rotational speed, as it passes over the islands. If it sticks mainly over water, might barely qualify as a Cat. 1 hurricane, briefly. Of course the news, and the holy models, suggest we panic, and buy lots of hurricane supplies, so we can stay home, and hide in the basement. Shelters, will, of course be packed full of plague-spreaders, so it safer to ride out this monster storm, rather than risk catching the killer-cold. These people a crazy, and will turn people away, if they aren't wearing masks, or the shelter is full (social distancing). It's an FCKing cold, how can you turn away people during a hurricane? Sometimes they spawn tornadoes too. No mask, or the first shelter you can find, tells you they already have 50 people packed into the FCKing school gym, or it's reserved for a Biden campaign rally...
31-07-2020 02:41
duncan61
★★★☆☆
(428)
Keep us posted buddy
02-08-2020 19:21
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
12:05 PM, Sunday... The models were of course wrong, and overhyped. We were expecting the monster hurricane last night, tropical storm conditions all day today. We just got a light sprinkle. Didn't completely soak the driveway though. Not much in the way of wind, saw some branches move a little, but basically calm. The clouds didn't really start to roll in, until about 10:00 this morning. I'm 60-70 miles from the coast, so either the tropical storm is still further off, or it ain't nothing to worry about. Not really sure if that little sprinkle was a squall line, since it hasn't repeated yet, and looks like the last batch already dried up. I'm use to the hype, but there is still a little rain and wind, beyond the normal. Looks like the sun is coming out some. Have to step outside after I post this, and take a closer look. My security cameras aren't pointing up.

Last time I checked, the eye of the storm was pretty close to land. Don't expect the storm to strengthen. It's slow moving, 8 MPH, unlikely to make landfall in Florida. Doubt it will pick up enough speed to molest any of those democrat states either. Likely go out to sea.
03-08-2020 04:30
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2160)
9:30 PM: Pretty disappointing storm. There have been squall lines passing through, but very little rain. The wind gusts, weren't much of anything either. I figured it wouldn't be much of a storm. Just didn't expect it to be this weak. Have to trust my instincts more in the future. Bummer is that there won't be any standing water to test the new tires on...




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