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16-09-2022 03:50
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Dude no one thinks that you are worth an argument.

Incorrect. You only speak for yourself. You can state that you don't think he is worth an argument, and you can solicit others to sign your petition, but that's as far as you get to go.

... unless you have signed documents from others authorizing you to speak for them. Do you have any?

Swan wrote: A mosquito is more valuable than you

... and you expect us to believe that you are a brilliant investor?

.


Retired fully at 55 and not on welfare like you and the clowns in your group of commy lemmings

Omniscience fallacy. Argument of the Stone fallacy. Stop making shit up.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
16-09-2022 03:51
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Retired fully at 55

... presumably because you have given up trying to hold down a job. Now you bide your time fantasizing about rocks that you pass while you ride your bicycle because you don't have a car and couldn't afford gasoline for it even if you did. You garden because you cannot otherwise afford food.

I presume you have a stream nearby for water.

Being "retired" is a nice way to put it.


And you are a slave to the system that will use you until you either die or become too weak to work, then they will dump you in the hospital where you will die.

So enjoy being a slave

I have got ten feet high tomato plants now, I could get to 15 feet high next year if I can figure out a proper trellis.

Smile

I can only figure you are describing yourself.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
16-09-2022 04:14
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Why would I argue the truth's that I post?
What argument?????!? What 'truth'??????!? Void argument fallacy.
Swan wrote:
LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work.
Disagree with what??????!? Void argument fallacy.
Swan wrote:
However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself.

Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

CIAO

Random words. No apparent coherency.

Trolling. No argument presented.


Why would I argue the truth's that I post? LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work. However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself. Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

Silly girl

CIAO

No need to alter perfection

Have fun arguing with yourself as usual

Repetition fallacy (chanting). No argument presented. Trolling.


Since you are not arguing with my points, it is clear that you agree.

You aren't making any points.
Swan wrote:
Why would I argue the truth's that I post? LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work. However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself. Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

Silly girl

CIAO

No need to alter perfection

Repetition fallacy (chanting).
Swan wrote:
Have fun arguing with yourself as usual

Inversion fallacy. Trolling. No argument presented.


Dude no one thinks that you are worth an argument. A mosquito is more valuable than you and all of your possessions that are not actually owned by the government.

You continually hope for an argument so that you can lie to yourself that you have self-worth, and without an argument you are worthless because no one cares about your sad excuse for a life.

Omniscience fallacy. Bulverism fallacy. Trolling. No argument presented.




Yawn


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
16-09-2022 06:36
GasGuzzler
★★★★★
(2548)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
Why would I argue the truth's that I post?
What argument?????!? What 'truth'??????!? Void argument fallacy.
Swan wrote:
LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work.
Disagree with what??????!? Void argument fallacy.
Swan wrote:
However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself.

Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

CIAO

Random words. No apparent coherency.

Trolling. No argument presented.


Why would I argue the truth's that I post? LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work. However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself. Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

Silly girl

CIAO

No need to alter perfection

Have fun arguing with yourself as usual

Repetition fallacy (chanting). No argument presented. Trolling.


Since you are not arguing with my points, it is clear that you agree.

You aren't making any points.
Swan wrote:
Why would I argue the truth's that I post? LOL if you disagree then you may argue, that is how discussions work. However, in your dysfunctional world you need for me to argue with myself. Sorry since I am always correct there is just no need for me to do that.

Silly girl

CIAO

No need to alter perfection

Repetition fallacy (chanting).
Swan wrote:
Have fun arguing with yourself as usual

Inversion fallacy. Trolling. No argument presented.


Dude no one thinks that you are worth an argument. A mosquito is more valuable than you and all of your possessions that are not actually owned by the government.

You continually hope for an argument so that you can lie to yourself that you have self-worth, and without an argument you are worthless because no one cares about your sad excuse for a life.

Omniscience fallacy. Bulverism fallacy. Trolling. No argument presented.




Yawn


Swan, I believe this Mark Twain quote is much suited to your writing style.


Studies show that if you force several tubs of peanut butter down the throats of newborns, in some cases it could potentially be toxic. In cities where infant-PB-stuffing is more common, infant deaths increased by over 47% with corresponding increases in dead-infant obesity.. -IBdaMann
Attached image:

16-09-2022 07:23
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
GasGuzzler wrote:
Swan wrote:Yawn
Swan, I believe this Mark Twain quote is much suited to your writing style.
[/quote]
Gentlemen, I think the attached graphic is probably the most applicable, although I'm a tad dubious about the authenticity of the quote.
.
Attached image:

16-09-2022 13:43
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
Swan wrote:Yawn
Swan, I believe this Mark Twain quote is much suited to your writing style.

Gentlemen, I think the attached graphic is probably the most applicable, although I'm a tad dubious about the authenticity of the quote.
.[/quote]

Naval exercise

Kursk was a Project 949A Antey (Oscar-II class) submarine, twice the length of a 747 jumbo jet, and one of the largest submarines in the Russian Navy.
On the morning of 12 August 2000, Kursk was in the Barents Sea, participating in the "Summer-X" exercise, the first large-scale naval exercise planned by the Russian Navy in more than a decade, and also its first since the fall of the Soviet Union.[6] It consisted of 30 ships and three submarines.[7]

Kursk had recently won a citation for its excellent performance and been recognised as having the best submarine crew in the Northern Fleet.[5] Although this was an exercise, Kursk loaded a full complement of conventional combat weapons. It was one of the few submarines authorised to carry a combat load at all times. This included 18 RPK-6 Vodopad/RPK-7 Veter (SS-N-16 "Stallion") antisubmarine missiles and 24 P-700 Granit (SS-N-19 "Shipwreck") cruise missiles, which were designed to defeat the best naval air defences.[7]

Kursk had a mythical standing. It was reputedly unsinkable and it was claimed to withstand a direct hit from a torpedo.[8] The outer hull was constructed using 8 mm (0.3 in) steel plate covered by up to 80 mm (3 in) of rubber, which minimised other submarines' or surface vessels' ability to detect the submarine. The inner pressure hull was made of high-quality 50 mm (2 in) steel plate. The two hulls were separated by a 1-to-2 m (3-to-7 ft) gap. The inner hull was divided into nine water-tight compartments. The boat was 508 ft (154.8 m), about as long as two jumbo jets.[8][9]

At 08:51 local time, Kursk requested permission to conduct a torpedo training launch and received the response "Dobro" ("Good").[5][10] After considerable delay, the submarine was set to fire two dummy torpedoes at the Kirov-class battlecruiser Pyotr Velikiy. At 11:29 local time,[4] the torpedo room crew loaded the first practice Type 65 "Kit" torpedo, (Russian: tolstushka, or "fat girl", because of its size),[11] without a warhead,[12] into Kursk's number-4 torpedo tube on the starboard side. It was 10.7 m (35 ft) long and weighed 5 t (4.9 long tons; 5.5 short tons).[13]

Initial seismic event detected

Norwegian Seismic Array seismic readings at three locations of the explosions on the submarine Kursk on 12 August 2000.
At 11:29:34 (07:29:50 GMT), seismic detectors at the Norwegian seismic array (NORSAR) and in other locations around the world recorded a seismic event of magnitude 1.5 on the Richter scale.[14] The location was fixed at coordinates 69°38′N 37°19′E, north-east of Murmansk, approximately 250 km (160 mi) from Norway, and 80 km (50 mi) from the Kola Peninsula.[15]

Secondary event
At 11:31:48,[14] 2 minutes and 14 seconds after the first, a second event, measuring 4.2 on the Richter scale, or 250 times larger than the first,[13] was registered on seismographs across northern Europe[16] and was detected as far away as Alaska.[8] The second explosion was equivalent to 2–3 tons of TNT.[4]

The seismic data showed that the explosion occurred at the same depth as the sea bed.[14] The seismic event, triangulated at 69°36.99′N 37°34.50′E, showed that the boat had moved about 400 m (1,300 ft) from the site of the initial explosion. It was enough time for the submarine to sink to a depth of 108 m (354 ft) and remain on the sea floor for a short period.[14]

Rescue response
The crew of the submarine Karelia detected the explosion, but the captain assumed that it was part of the exercise.[17] Aboard Pyotr Velikiy, the target of the practice launch, the crew detected a hydroacoustic signal characteristic of an underwater explosion and felt their hull shudder.[18] They reported the phenomenon to fleet headquarters but their report was ignored.[17]

The schedule for Kursk to complete the practice torpedo firing expired at 13:30 without any contact from the sub. Accustomed to the frequent failure of communications equipment, Fleet Commander Admiral Vyacheslav Alekseyevich Popov, aboard Pyotr Velikiy, was not initially alarmed.[19]: 36  The ship dispatched a helicopter to look for Kursk, but it was unable to locate the sub on the surface; this was reported to Popov.[20]


Russian sailors on the surface aboard the DSRV AS-28 Priz
The Northern Fleet duty officer notified the head of the fleet's search and rescue forces, Captain Alexander Teslenko, to stand by for orders. Teslenko's primary rescue ship was a 20-year-old former lumber carrier, Mikhail Rudnitsky, which had been converted to support submersible rescue operations.[21] Teslenko notified the ship's captain to be ready to depart on one hour's notice.[18] Berthed at the primary Northern Fleet base at Severomorsk,[22] the ship was equipped with two AS-32 and AS-34 Priz-class deep-submergence rescue vehicles, a diving bell, underwater video cameras, lifting cranes, and other specialised gear,[22] but she was not equipped with stabilisers capable of keeping the vessel in position during stormy weather and could lower her rescue vessels only in calm seas.[21]: 72  The Russian Navy had previously operated two India-class submarines, each of which carried a pair of Poseidon-class DSRVs that could reach a depth of 693 m (2,270 ft), but due to a lack of funds, the vessels had been held since 1994 in a Saint Petersburg yard for pending repairs.[22][23][24]

At 17:00, an Ilyushin 38 aircraft was dispatched. The crew spent three hours unsuccessfully searching for Kursk.[21]: 74  At 18:00, more than six hours after the initial explosion, Kursk failed to complete a scheduled communication check.[10] The Northern Fleet command became concerned and tried to contact the boat. After repeated failures, at 18:30, they began a search-and-rescue operation, dispatching additional aircraft to locate the submarine, which again failed to locate the boat on the surface.[18][25] At 22:30, the Northern Fleet declared an emergency, and the exercise was stopped.[18] Between 15 and 22 vessels of the Northern Fleet, including about 3,000 sailors, began searching for the submarine. The Mikhail Rudnitsky left port at 00:30.[10][18]

Official government response
The Russian Navy initially downplayed the incident. Late on Saturday night, 9 hours after the boat sank, Northern Fleet commander Admiral Popov ordered the first search for the submarine. Twelve hours after it sank, Popov informed the Kremlin, but Minister of Defence Igor Sergeyev did not notify Putin until 07:00 Sunday morning. Sergeyev "did not recommend" that Putin visit the disaster site.[22]

On Sunday, after Popov already knew that Kursk was missing and presumed sunk, he briefed reporters on the progress of the naval exercise. He said the exercise had been a resounding success and spoke highly of the entire operation.[5]: 149 [19]: 23 

Rumours among family members
Early on Sunday morning, 13 August, at the Vidyaevo Naval Base, rumours began to circulate among family members of Kursk's crew that something was wrong. A telephone operator handled an unusual volume of calls and overheard that a submarine was in trouble and the boat's name. As the base was very small, news spread quickly. Wives and family members exchanged news, but information was scarce. Because Kursk was regarded as unsinkable, family members wished to discount the worst of the rumors. They hoped that Kursk was merely experiencing a temporary communication problem. The deputy base commander assured the women that the headquarters office was half empty and that the officers present were just "passing the time."[21]: 87 


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
17-09-2022 21:06
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:Naval exercise

Kursk was a Project 949A Antey (Oscar-II class) submarine, twice the length of a 747 jumbo jet, and one of the largest submarines in the Russian Navy.
On the morning of 12 August 2000, Kursk was in the Barents Sea, participating in the "Summer-X" exercise, the first large-scale naval exercise planned by the Russian Navy in more than a decade, and also its first since the fall of the Soviet Union.It consisted of 30 ships and three submarines. 

The IBDanalysis:



On 12 August 2000, the nuclear submarine Курск (Kursk) departed from the hidden nuclear submarine base at Западная лица (Zapadnaya Litsa) to join other ships of the Northern Fleet in an operational exercise centered around the Flagship carrier Кузнецов (Kuznetzov).



Russia's biggest concern at the time was American carriers and submarines, and the operational exercise was a simulated attack by Americans on the Kuznetov.

Enter Геннадий Петрович Лячин (Gennady Petrovich Liachin), the Captain of the Kursk.



Although it was an operational exercise, it was nonetheless an exercise, i.e. training, and the Captain of the Kursk was an idiot for not understanding this. He did not need to carry the volatile hydrogen-peroxide torpedoes that were extremely dangerous due to their tendency to spontaneously explode from sparks, heat or even organic matter.

Guess what happened. One of the torpedos exploded as it was being loaded for "launch," probably immediately killing all people in the adjoining bays and putting the remaining torpedoes in the middle of a huge fire.

Guess what happened two minutes later. Several torpedoes engulfed in the fire exploded, blasting a gaping hole in the hull and plunging the Kursk into a nosedive to the ocean floor 108 meters deep at that point.

Of course there were crew still alive as the Kursk plunged to the bottom roughly 73 kilometers off the coast.

One of the notable survivors was Dmitry Kolesnikov, officer in charge of the turbine room, who managed to grab a pen and paper, and in complete darkness did his best to document what was going on. He documented the crew's actions while his bay was filling with water. His final words, "Must not despair" were displayed at his eventual funeral arrangements.



Another notable survivor remains unnamed because we do not know which member of the crew he was. He managed to find an air pocket or something that enabled him to remain alive for a while longer. He continued to tap/bang on something metal in an effort to assist the search and rescue effort that Russia did not permit to occur lest other countries discover embarrassing details of Russia's botched military exercise.

Russia's bluff was totally transparent and doomed to be fruitless. US and UK intelligence was aware of the exercise and had submarines "tailing" the Kursk and other ships in the Northern fleet the moment they pulled out to sea. When the first torpedo detonated aboard the Kursk, as well as when the huge blast(s) occurred two minutes later, that information was echoed all throughout NATO. When NATO realized that Russia was totally bungling their search and rescue effort, US and UK officials asked Norway to "offer to help." Their cover story was to be that the Norwegian spy ship Marjata happened to be in the neighborhood when it detected the (Kursk's) blasts and would like to offer assistance. Russia did not accept any offers to help.
Edited on 17-09-2022 21:10
18-09-2022 13:29
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Naval exercise

Kursk was a Project 949A Antey (Oscar-II class) submarine, twice the length of a 747 jumbo jet, and one of the largest submarines in the Russian Navy.
On the morning of 12 August 2000, Kursk was in the Barents Sea, participating in the "Summer-X" exercise, the first large-scale naval exercise planned by the Russian Navy in more than a decade, and also its first since the fall of the Soviet Union.It consisted of 30 ships and three submarines. 

The IBDanalysis:



On 12 August 2000, the nuclear submarine Курск (Kursk) departed from the hidden nuclear submarine base at Западная лица (Zapadnaya Litsa) to join other ships of the Northern Fleet in an operational exercise centered around the Flagship carrier Кузнецов (Kuznetzov).



Russia's biggest concern at the time was American carriers and submarines, and the operational exercise was a simulated attack by Americans on the Kuznetov.

Enter Геннадий Петрович Лячин (Gennady Petrovich Liachin), the Captain of the Kursk.



Although it was an operational exercise, it was nonetheless an exercise, i.e. training, and the Captain of the Kursk was an idiot for not understanding this. He did not need to carry the volatile hydrogen-peroxide torpedoes that were extremely dangerous due to their tendency to spontaneously explode from sparks, heat or even organic matter.

Guess what happened. One of the torpedos exploded as it was being loaded for "launch," probably immediately killing all people in the adjoining bays and putting the remaining torpedoes in the middle of a huge fire.

Guess what happened two minutes later. Several torpedoes engulfed in the fire exploded, blasting a gaping hole in the hull and plunging the Kursk into a nosedive to the ocean floor 108 meters deep at that point.

Of course there were crew still alive as the Kursk plunged to the bottom roughly 73 kilometers off the coast.

One of the notable survivors was Dmitry Kolesnikov, officer in charge of the turbine room, who managed to grab a pen and paper, and in complete darkness did his best to document what was going on. He documented the crew's actions while his bay was filling with water. His final words, "Must not despair" were displayed at his eventual funeral arrangements.



Another notable survivor remains unnamed because we do not know which member of the crew he was. He managed to find an air pocket or something that enabled him to remain alive for a while longer. He continued to tap/bang on something metal in an effort to assist the search and rescue effort that Russia did not permit to occur lest other countries discover embarrassing details of Russia's botched military exercise.

Russia's bluff was totally transparent and doomed to be fruitless. US and UK intelligence was aware of the exercise and had submarines "tailing" the Kursk and other ships in the Northern fleet the moment they pulled out to sea. When the first torpedo detonated aboard the Kursk, as well as when the huge blast(s) occurred two minutes later, that information was echoed all throughout NATO. When NATO realized that Russia was totally bungling their search and rescue effort, US and UK officials asked Norway to "offer to help." Their cover story was to be that the Norwegian spy ship Marjata happened to be in the neighborhood when it detected the (Kursk's) blasts and would like to offer assistance. Russia did not accept any offers to help.


Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
18-09-2022 16:25
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
18-09-2022 20:00
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?


Says the schizophrenic that denies both the holocaust and the last ice age. So, kid until you rectify that you are fully mentally unstable and would clearly benefit from another hospital stay with high doses of Thorazine. You know like your mother used to put in your cereal


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
18-09-2022 20:53
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
Says the schizophrenic that denies

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
18-09-2022 21:52
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
Says the schizophrenic that denies

What part of my treatise are you disputing?


The part where there was never an ice age or holocaust, and everything in-between as you are controlled by voices from beta gamma centaury and or the man who lives in the milk aisle at the Acme


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
18-09-2022 22:26
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
Says the schizophrenic that denies

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
The part where there was never an ice age or holocaust, and everything in-between ...

So you don't dispute anything I wrote, and you are referring to it as a delusion.

Genius.
18-09-2022 22:49
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
Says the schizophrenic that denies

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
The part where there was never an ice age or holocaust, and everything in-between ...

So you don't dispute anything I wrote, and you are referring to it as a delusion.

Genius.


Says the retard who denies that the ice age left thousands of miles of terminal moraines.

Technically my IQ of 130 is not genius, but I did buy Apple when you bought Coors and as a result I am officially retired, something that you will never be as you are owned.


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
Edited on 18-09-2022 23:31
19-09-2022 16:58
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:Technically my IQ of 30 is not genius, but it does enable me to believe both that there somehow is a numerical rating for intelligence and that mine is 130 because I get to handicap

I didn't realize you were that thmart! I take back everything I said and I defer entirely to you.

Tell me more about how you traveled back in time to verify the "ice age." Did you take your quantum teleporter with you to ensure you checked everywhere?
19-09-2022 17:49
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Technically my IQ of 30 is not genius, but it does enable me to believe both that there somehow is a numerical rating for intelligence and that mine is 130 because I get to handicap

I didn't realize you were that thmart! I take back everything I said and I defer entirely to you.

Tell me more about how you traveled back in time to verify the "ice age." Did you take your quantum teleporter with you to ensure you checked everywhere?


No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

However a moron like you that denies both the holocaust and the last ice age will never know.


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
19-09-2022 19:14
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.
19-09-2022 19:43
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.


Says the mental patient who denies the holocaust and the last ice age. Now on a serious note, have you discussed your belief that history did not happen because you were not there to see it unfold with your psychiatrist. Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
19-09-2022 19:54
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote: Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.

That's not possible for anyone. You have first place locked with your theory that Queen Elizabeth sunk the Kursk over the FBI snubbing you keep the world from learning that Bush pulled the trigger on JFK using quantum teleportation and eggplants.

I'm dying to see your trophy.
19-09-2022 20:08
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote: Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.

That's not possible for anyone. You have first place locked with your theory that Queen Elizabeth sunk the Kursk over the FBI snubbing you keep the world from learning that Bush pulled the trigger on JFK using quantum teleportation and eggplants.

I'm dying to see your trophy.


Ya know, you are even sillier when you get really frustrated.

Says the mental patient who denies the holocaust and the last ice age. Now on a serious note, have you discussed your belief that history did not happen because you were not there to see it unfold with your psychiatrist. Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.

Now lie back on the couch and tell us all about your theory on how queen elizabeth sank the kursk, now that you brought it up

Quick call someone with a real PhD


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
Edited on 19-09-2022 20:18
19-09-2022 20:42
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote: Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.

That's not possible for anyone. You have first place locked with your theory that Queen Elizabeth sunk the Kursk over the FBI snubbing you keep the world from learning that Bush pulled the trigger on JFK using quantum teleportation and eggplants.

I'm dying to see your trophy.


Ya know, you are even sillier when you get really frustrated.

You wouldn't know. You have never seen me frustrated.

Are you cheesed that you forgot to specify what history I am supposedly denying?
19-09-2022 20:47
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote: Seriously you could actually win a prize from the men in white coats for this nonsense.

That's not possible for anyone. You have first place locked with your theory that Queen Elizabeth sunk the Kursk over the FBI snubbing you keep the world from learning that Bush pulled the trigger on JFK using quantum teleportation and eggplants.

I'm dying to see your trophy.


Ya know, you are even sillier when you get really frustrated.

You wouldn't know. You have never seen me frustrated.

Are you cheesed that you forgot to specify what history I am supposedly denying?


Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.

Ya know, technically you can ask your mommy for help when you get stumped like now.

Seriously are you in the FBI? because you have a very special agent kind of stupid.


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
Edited on 19-09-2022 20:57
19-09-2022 21:01
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.

How was the ice age documented,and by whom?

Ya know, technically you can ask your mommy for help when you get stumped like now.
19-09-2022 21:11
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.

How was the ice age documented,and by whom?

Ya know, technically you can ask your mommy for help when you get stumped like now.


The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Silly girl


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
19-09-2022 21:50
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.
How was the ice age documented,and by whom?
The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

So what we have just learned is that:

1. "History" is another word whose meaning you don't understand
2. You meant to say that the ice age is prehistoric and not part of history.

OK, got it.

The answer is no. Time travel is required to verify the ice age in order to verify the conclusion that the landforms were caused by the ice age being verified.

You haven't the benefit of Into the Night's explanation of circular arguments and religious beliefs. You stand at a disadvantage.

Swan wrote:How do we know about past ice ages?

We don't. We can only speculate. We can't travel time to verify any speculation. However, we don't need to travel time to verify your gullibility.

Swan wrote:Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Nope. Scientists have constructed an intricate speculation that has some major flaws that cannot be ignored ... except by gullibles.

Feel free to ignore away.

Swan wrote:Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate.

Ice and sediment cores reveal next to nothing. The impressive detail lies in the wondrous speculation of gullible people who ignore major flaws and physics violations.

Swan wrote:Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Nope. They have revealed next to nothing, but have fueled the most detailed and fantastic speculations yet!

Swan wrote:Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

There is no reason to believe any ice ages have ever happened. All you have is your own self-generated circular arguments.

Swan wrote:On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years.

What are you claiming this even means? What is this "global climate" anyway? What constitutes an "abrupt climate change" as measured in these "records"?

Post these records so they can be scrutinized by people who aren't gullible like you.

Swan wrote: Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more.

How do you explain this claim given that nobody can measure earth's average global temperature to within any usable accuracy?

You apparently just believe whatever you are told to believe.

Swan wrote:For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle,

Nope. There's no reason to presume that there is any such "cycle."

Swan wrote:the warming trend

Nope. There's no reason to be so gullible as to believe that there were ever any "warming trends."

Swan wrote: ... was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades.

Back then, satellites took thorough global temperature data from the global ice cores.

Your religion is about as WACKY as they come.
19-09-2022 21:54
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.
How was the ice age documented,and by whom?
The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

So what we have just learned is that:

1. "History" is another word whose meaning you don't understand
2. You meant to say that the ice age is prehistoric and not part of history.

OK, got it.

The answer is no. Time travel is required to verify the ice age in order to verify the conclusion that the landforms were caused by the ice age being verified.

You haven't the benefit of Into the Night's explanation of circular arguments and religious beliefs. You stand at a disadvantage.

Swan wrote:How do we know about past ice ages?

We don't. We can only speculate. We can't travel time to verify any speculation. However, we don't need to travel time to verify your gullibility.

Swan wrote:Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Nope. Scientists have constructed an intricate speculation that has some major flaws that cannot be ignored ... except by gullibles.

Feel free to ignore away.

Swan wrote:Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate.

Ice and sediment cores reveal next to nothing. The impressive detail lies in the wondrous speculation of gullible people who ignore major flaws and physics violations.

Swan wrote:Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Nope. They have revealed next to nothing, but have fueled the most detailed and fantastic speculations yet!

Swan wrote:Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

There is no reason to believe any ice ages have ever happened. All you have is your own self-generated circular arguments.

Swan wrote:On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years.

What are you claiming this even means? What is this "global climate" anyway? What constitutes an "abrupt climate change" as measured in these "records"?

Post these records so they can be scrutinized by people who aren't gullible like you.

Swan wrote: Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more.

How do you explain this claim given that nobody can measure earth's average global temperature to within any usable accuracy?

You apparently just believe whatever you are told to believe.

Swan wrote:For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle,

Nope. There's no reason to presume that there is any such "cycle."

Swan wrote:the warming trend

Nope. There's no reason to be so gullible as to believe that there were ever any "warming trends."

Swan wrote: ... was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades.

Back then, satellites took thorough global temperature data from the global ice cores.

Your religion is about as WACKY as they come.


https://www.history.com/topics/pre-history/ice-age

An ice age is a period of colder global temperatures and recurring glacial expansion capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years. Thanks to the efforts of geologist Louis Agassiz and mathematician Milutin Milankovitch, scientists have determined that variations in the Earth's orbit and shifting plate tectonics spur the waxing and waning of these periods.

There have been at least five significant ice ages in Earth's history, with approximately a dozen epochs of glacial expansion occurring in the past 1 million years. Humans developed significantly during the most recent glaciation period, emerging as the dominant land animal afterward as megafauna such as the wooly mammoth went extinct.

During an ice age, colder global temperatures lead to recurring glacial expansion across the Earth's surface. Capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years, these periods are interspersed with regular warmer interglacial intervals in which at least one major ice sheet is present. Earth is currently in the midst of an ice age, as the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets remain intact despite moderate temperatures.

These global cooling periods begin when a drop in temperature prevents snow from fully melting in some areas. The bottom layer turns to ice, which becomes a glacier as the weight of accumulated snow causes it to slowly move forward. A cyclical pattern emerges in which the snow and ice traps the Earth's moisture, fueling the growth of these ice sheets as the sea levels simultaneously drop.


READ MORE: How Humans Survived the Ice Age

How an Ice Age Changes Earth
An ice age causes enormous changes to the Earth's surface. Glaciers reshape the landscape by picking up rocks and soil and eroding hills during their unstoppable push, their sheer weight depressing the Earth's crust. As temperatures drop in areas adjacent to these ice cliffs, cold-weather plant life is driven to southern latitudes.

Meanwhile, the dramatic drop in sea levels enables rivers to carve out deeper valleys and produce enormous inland lakes, with previously submerged land bridges appearing between continents. Upon retreating during warmer periods, the glaciers leave behind scattered ridges of sediment and fill basins with melted water to create new lakes.

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-them/#:~:text=How%20do%20we%20know%20about,detailed%20history%20of%20global%20climate.

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Quote everything again like the retard that you are, no one will ever read all of your anal babbling, but at least you are having fun jerking off in public


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
Edited on 19-09-2022 22:01
19-09-2022 22:26
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Another delusion, as that came from Popular Mechanix. Not that a delusional fool who denies the holocaust and the last ice age can comprehend

LOL. LOL. Too funny.

Everything I write about the Kursk disaster comes from original documentation at the time or my own analysis that you won't find anywhere else (easily) but that you can take to the bank.

Yours is strictly cut-n-paste from Wikipedia and omits my value-added context-giving insights.

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
Says the schizophrenic that denies

What part of my treatise are you disputing?
The part where there was never an ice age or holocaust, and everything in-between ...

So you don't dispute anything I wrote, and you are referring to it as a delusion.

Genius.


Says the retard who denies that the ice age left thousands of miles of terminal moraines.

Technically my IQ of 130 is not genius, but I did buy Apple when you bought Coors and as a result I am officially retired, something that you will never be as you are owned.

What ice age?????!?
Argument from randU fallacy. IQ is a meaningless number.
Omniscience fallacy. Assumption of victory fallacy. Jealousy.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:27
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Technically my IQ of 30 is not genius, but it does enable me to believe both that there somehow is a numerical rating for intelligence and that mine is 130 because I get to handicap

I didn't realize you were that thmart! I take back everything I said and I defer entirely to you.

Tell me more about how you traveled back in time to verify the "ice age." Did you take your quantum teleporter with you to ensure you checked everywhere?


No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

However a moron like you that denies both the holocaust and the last ice age will never know.

What 'ice age'?????!? How do you know they are moraines at all?????!? How do you know they formed at the same time??????!?


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:34
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Technically my IQ of 30 is not genius, but it does enable me to believe both that there somehow is a numerical rating for intelligence and that mine is 130 because I get to handicap

I didn't realize you were that thmart! I take back everything I said and I defer entirely to you.

Tell me more about how you traveled back in time to verify the "ice age." Did you take your quantum teleporter with you to ensure you checked everywhere?


No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

However a moron like you that denies both the holocaust and the last ice age will never know.

What 'ice age'?????!? How do you know they are moraines at all?????!? How do you know they formed at the same time??????!?



https://www.history.com/topics/pre-history/ice-age

An ice age is a period of colder global temperatures and recurring glacial expansion capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years. Thanks to the efforts of geologist Louis Agassiz and mathematician Milutin Milankovitch, scientists have determined that variations in the Earth's orbit and shifting plate tectonics spur the waxing and waning of these periods.

There have been at least five significant ice ages in Earth's history, with approximately a dozen epochs of glacial expansion occurring in the past 1 million years. Humans developed significantly during the most recent glaciation period, emerging as the dominant land animal afterward as megafauna such as the wooly mammoth went extinct.

During an ice age, colder global temperatures lead to recurring glacial expansion across the Earth's surface. Capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years, these periods are interspersed with regular warmer interglacial intervals in which at least one major ice sheet is present. Earth is currently in the midst of an ice age, as the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets remain intact despite moderate temperatures.

These global cooling periods begin when a drop in temperature prevents snow from fully melting in some areas. The bottom layer turns to ice, which becomes a glacier as the weight of accumulated snow causes it to slowly move forward. A cyclical pattern emerges in which the snow and ice traps the Earth's moisture, fueling the growth of these ice sheets as the sea levels simultaneously drop.


READ MORE: How Humans Survived the Ice Age

How an Ice Age Changes Earth
An ice age causes enormous changes to the Earth's surface. Glaciers reshape the landscape by picking up rocks and soil and eroding hills during their unstoppable push, their sheer weight depressing the Earth's crust. As temperatures drop in areas adjacent to these ice cliffs, cold-weather plant life is driven to southern latitudes.

Meanwhile, the dramatic drop in sea levels enables rivers to carve out deeper valleys and produce enormous inland lakes, with previously submerged land bridges appearing between continents. Upon retreating during warmer periods, the glaciers leave behind scattered ridges of sediment and fill basins with melted water to create new lakes.

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-them/#:~:text=How%20do%20we%20know%20about,detailed%20history%20of%20global%20climate.

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Quote everything again like the retard that you are, no one will ever read all of your anal babbling, but at least you are having fun jerking off in public


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
19-09-2022 22:36
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.

He need not ask. I will explain. Pay attention Swan.

An argument is a conclusion and a set of predicates.

A circular argument is one that uses it's own conclusion as a predicate. By itself it is not a fallacy. This type of argument is also known as the Argument of Faith. It is the basis of every religion.

If one tries to prove a circular argument True, they create the Circular Argument fallacy. It is not possible to prove any circular argument either True. Those that try this (particularly those that try to prove such an argument True), are fundamentalists. That's what fundamentalism is. The attempt to prove a circular argument True.

You, Swan, claim that an ice age occurred, even though you cannot go back in time to see it. You just claim it occurred, and claim these magick moraines are the result of it. This is fundamentalism. You are trying to prove a circular argument True. It is the basis of one of your religions. Indeed, it is the basis for ALL of your religions.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:46
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
Into the Night wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.

He need not ask. I will explain. Pay attention Swan.

An argument is a conclusion and a set of predicates.

A circular argument is one that uses it's own conclusion as a predicate. By itself it is not a fallacy. This type of argument is also known as the Argument of Faith. It is the basis of every religion.

If one tries to prove a circular argument True, they create the Circular Argument fallacy. It is not possible to prove any circular argument either True. Those that try this (particularly those that try to prove such an argument True), are fundamentalists. That's what fundamentalism is. The attempt to prove a circular argument True.

You, Swan, claim that an ice age occurred, even though you cannot go back in time to see it. You just claim it occurred, and claim these magick moraines are the result of it. This is fundamentalism. You are trying to prove a circular argument True. It is the basis of one of your religions. Indeed, it is the basis for ALL of your religions.


You are confused as none of these are my arguments for the last ice age. Seriously just because you want them to be my evidence of the last ice age does not make it true

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-them/#:~:text=How%20do%20we%20know%20about,detailed%20history%20of%20global%20climate.

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Yawning


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
19-09-2022 22:50
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.

How was the ice age documented,and by whom?

Ya know, technically you can ask your mommy for help when you get stumped like now.


The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Science is not religion.
Swan wrote:
Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate.

There is no such thing as a 'global climate'. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Ice cores do not measure temperature, precipitation, wind speeds or direction, humidity, barometric pressure, or even what life existed on Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Climate isn't a record. There is no record.
Swan wrote:
Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

What ice ages????!?
Swan wrote:
Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). False authority fallacy. Climate cannot change. Buzzword fallacy. Void authority fallacy by meta.
Swan wrote:
Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

There are no records. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly.

It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Math error. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Assumption of Universal Truth as meta.
Swan wrote:
Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years.

There are no records. Circular argument fallacy. Void authority fallacy. Climate cannot change. There is no value in climate associated with climate that can change.
Swan wrote:
One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more.

Climate has no temperature. It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Argument from randU fallacy.
Swan wrote:
For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades.

What last 'glacial cycle'?????!? What 'warming trend'?????!? It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Argument from randU fallacy. It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Silly girl

Insults are not arguments. Insult fallacy. Racism.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:52
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.
How was the ice age documented,and by whom?
The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

So what we have just learned is that:

1. "History" is another word whose meaning you don't understand
2. You meant to say that the ice age is prehistoric and not part of history.

OK, got it.

The answer is no. Time travel is required to verify the ice age in order to verify the conclusion that the landforms were caused by the ice age being verified.

You haven't the benefit of Into the Night's explanation of circular arguments and religious beliefs. You stand at a disadvantage.

Swan wrote:How do we know about past ice ages?

We don't. We can only speculate. We can't travel time to verify any speculation. However, we don't need to travel time to verify your gullibility.

Swan wrote:Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Nope. Scientists have constructed an intricate speculation that has some major flaws that cannot be ignored ... except by gullibles.

Feel free to ignore away.

Swan wrote:Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate.

Ice and sediment cores reveal next to nothing. The impressive detail lies in the wondrous speculation of gullible people who ignore major flaws and physics violations.

Swan wrote:Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Nope. They have revealed next to nothing, but have fueled the most detailed and fantastic speculations yet!

Swan wrote:Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

There is no reason to believe any ice ages have ever happened. All you have is your own self-generated circular arguments.

Swan wrote:On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years.

What are you claiming this even means? What is this "global climate" anyway? What constitutes an "abrupt climate change" as measured in these "records"?

Post these records so they can be scrutinized by people who aren't gullible like you.

Swan wrote: Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more.

How do you explain this claim given that nobody can measure earth's average global temperature to within any usable accuracy?

You apparently just believe whatever you are told to believe.

Swan wrote:For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle,

Nope. There's no reason to presume that there is any such "cycle."

Swan wrote:the warming trend

Nope. There's no reason to be so gullible as to believe that there were ever any "warming trends."

Swan wrote: ... was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades.

Back then, satellites took thorough global temperature data from the global ice cores.

Your religion is about as WACKY as they come.


https://www.history.com/topics/pre-history/ice-age

An ice age is a period of colder global temperatures and recurring glacial expansion capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years. Thanks to the efforts of geologist Louis Agassiz and mathematician Milutin Milankovitch, scientists have determined that variations in the Earth's orbit and shifting plate tectonics spur the waxing and waning of these periods.

There have been at least five significant ice ages in Earth's history, with approximately a dozen epochs of glacial expansion occurring in the past 1 million years. Humans developed significantly during the most recent glaciation period, emerging as the dominant land animal afterward as megafauna such as the wooly mammoth went extinct.

During an ice age, colder global temperatures lead to recurring glacial expansion across the Earth's surface. Capable of lasting hundreds of millions of years, these periods are interspersed with regular warmer interglacial intervals in which at least one major ice sheet is present. Earth is currently in the midst of an ice age, as the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets remain intact despite moderate temperatures.

These global cooling periods begin when a drop in temperature prevents snow from fully melting in some areas. The bottom layer turns to ice, which becomes a glacier as the weight of accumulated snow causes it to slowly move forward. A cyclical pattern emerges in which the snow and ice traps the Earth's moisture, fueling the growth of these ice sheets as the sea levels simultaneously drop.


READ MORE: How Humans Survived the Ice Age

How an Ice Age Changes Earth
An ice age causes enormous changes to the Earth's surface. Glaciers reshape the landscape by picking up rocks and soil and eroding hills during their unstoppable push, their sheer weight depressing the Earth's crust. As temperatures drop in areas adjacent to these ice cliffs, cold-weather plant life is driven to southern latitudes.

Meanwhile, the dramatic drop in sea levels enables rivers to carve out deeper valleys and produce enormous inland lakes, with previously submerged land bridges appearing between continents. Upon retreating during warmer periods, the glaciers leave behind scattered ridges of sediment and fill basins with melted water to create new lakes.

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-them/#:~:text=How%20do%20we%20know%20about,detailed%20history%20of%20global%20climate.

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Quote everything again like the retard that you are, no one will ever read all of your anal babbling, but at least you are having fun jerking off in public

Argument by repetition fallacy. Insult fallacies. Argument by randU fallacies. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Buzzword fallacies.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:57
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.

He need not ask. I will explain. Pay attention Swan.

An argument is a conclusion and a set of predicates.

A circular argument is one that uses it's own conclusion as a predicate. By itself it is not a fallacy. This type of argument is also known as the Argument of Faith. It is the basis of every religion.

If one tries to prove a circular argument True, they create the Circular Argument fallacy. It is not possible to prove any circular argument either True. Those that try this (particularly those that try to prove such an argument True), are fundamentalists. That's what fundamentalism is. The attempt to prove a circular argument True.

You, Swan, claim that an ice age occurred, even though you cannot go back in time to see it. You just claim it occurred, and claim these magick moraines are the result of it. This is fundamentalism. You are trying to prove a circular argument True. It is the basis of one of your religions. Indeed, it is the basis for ALL of your religions.


You are confused as none of these are my arguments for the last ice age.

Blatant lie.
Swan wrote:
Seriously just because you want them to be my evidence of the last ice age does not make it true

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
...deleted Holy Links...

False authority fallacy. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history:
...deleted repetition...

Argument by repetition fallacy (chanting). Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Argument from randU fallacies. False and void authority fallacies. Insult fallacies.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
19-09-2022 22:58
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:Says the fool who both denies the last ice age and who also does not know that it is part of history.

How was the ice age documented,and by whom?

Ya know, technically you can ask your mommy for help when you get stumped like now.


The ice age is documented by the landforms that it left behind.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Science is not religion.
Swan wrote:
Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate.

There is no such thing as a 'global climate'. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Ice cores do not measure temperature, precipitation, wind speeds or direction, humidity, barometric pressure, or even what life existed on Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Climate isn't a record. There is no record.
Swan wrote:
Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

What ice ages????!?
Swan wrote:
Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). False authority fallacy. Climate cannot change. Buzzword fallacy. Void authority fallacy by meta.
Swan wrote:
Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

There are no records. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly.

It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Math error. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Assumption of Universal Truth as meta.
Swan wrote:
Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years.

There are no records. Circular argument fallacy. Void authority fallacy. Climate cannot change. There is no value in climate associated with climate that can change.
Swan wrote:
One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more.

Climate has no temperature. It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Argument from randU fallacy.
Swan wrote:
For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades.

What last 'glacial cycle'?????!? What 'warming trend'?????!? It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Argument from randU fallacy. It is not possible to measure the temperature of the Earth. Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism).
Swan wrote:
Silly girl

Insults are not arguments. Insult fallacy. Racism.


Who do you believe reads your anal babbles?

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

What is an ice age?
An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

At least five major ice ages have occurred throughout Earth's history: the earliest was over 2 billion years ago, and the most recent one began approximately 3 million years ago and continues today (yes, we live in an ice age!). Currently, we are in a warm interglacial that began about 11,000 years ago. The last period of glaciation, which is often informally called the "Ice Age," peaked about 20,000 years ago. At that time, the world was on average probably about 10°F (5°C) colder than today, and locally as much as 40°F (22°C) colder.

What causes an ice age and glacial-interglacial cycles?
Many factors contribute to climate variations, including changes in ocean and atmosphere circulation patterns, varying concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and even volcanic eruptions. The following discusses key factors in (1) initiating ice ages and (2) the timing of glacial-interglacial cycles.

Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).
Four fairly regular glacial-interglacial cycles occurred during the past 450,000 years. The shorter interglacial cycles (10,000 to 30,000 years) were about as warm as present and alternated with much longer (70,000 to 90,000 years) glacial cycles substantially colder than present. Notice the longer time with jagged cooling events dropping into the colder glacials followed by the faster abrupt temperature swings to the warmer interglacials. This graph combines several ice-core records from Antarctica and is modified from several sources including Evidence for Warmer Interglacials in East Antarctic Ice Cores, 2009, L.C. Sime and others. Note the shorter time scale of 450,000 years compared to the previous figure, as well as the colder temperatures, which are latitude-specific (e.g., Antartica, Alaska, Greenland) temperature changes inferred from the Antarctic ice cores (and not global averages).

One significant trigger in initiating ice ages is the changing positions of Earth's ever-moving continents, which affect ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns. When plate-tectonic movement causes continents to be arranged such that warm water flow from the equator to the poles is blocked or reduced, ice sheets may arise and set another ice age in motion. Today's ice age most likely began when the land bridge between North and South America (Isthmus of Panama) formed and ended the exchange of tropical water between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, significantly altering ocean currents.

Glacials and interglacials occur in fairly regular repeated cycles. The timing is governed to a large degree by predictable cyclic changes in Earth's orbit, which affect the amount of sunlight reaching different parts of Earth's surface. The three orbital variations are: (1) changes in Earth's orbit around the Sun (eccentricity), (2) shifts in the tilt of Earth's axis (obliquity), and (3) the wobbling motion of Earth's axis (precession).

How do we know about past ice ages?
Scientists have reconstructed past ice ages by piecing together information derived from studying ice cores, deep sea sediments, fossils, and landforms.

Ice and sediment cores reveal an impressive detailed history of global climate. Cores are collected by driving long hollow tubes as much as 2 miles deep into glacial ice or ocean floor sediments. Ice cores provide annual and even seasonal climate records for up to hundreds of thousands of years, complementing the millions of years of climate records in ocean sediment cores.

Within just the past couple of decades, ice cores recovered from Earth's two existing ice sheets, Greenland and Antarctica, have revealed the most detailed climate records yet.

Do ice ages come and go slowly or rapidly?

Simplified chart showing when the five major ice ages occurred in the past 2.4 billion years of Earth's history. Modified from several sources including Dynamical Paleoclimatology: Generalized Theory of Global Climate Change, 2002, by Barry Saltzman.

Records show that ice ages typically develop slowly, whereas they end more abruptly. Glacials and interglacials within an ice age display this same trend.

On a shorter time scale, global temperatures fluctuate often and rapidly. Various records reveal numerous large, widespread, abrupt climate changes over the past 100,000 years. One of the more recent intriguing findings is the remarkable speed of these changes. Within the incredibly short time span (by geologic standards) of only a few decades or even a few years, global temperatures have fluctuated by as much as 15°F (8°C) or more. For example, as Earth was emerging out of the last glacial cycle, the warming trend was interrupted 12,800 years ago when temperatures dropped dramatically in only several decades. A mere 1,300 years later, temperatures locally spiked as much as 20°F (11°C) within just several years. Sudden changes like this occurred at least 24 times during the past 100,000 years. In a relative sense, we are in a time of unusually stable temperatures today—how long will it last?

Quote everything three times like the anal-retentive turd that you are. No one cares about your refusal to accept science


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
Edited on 19-09-2022 23:00
20-09-2022 01:20
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(19283)
Swan wrote:
[quote]Into the Night wrote:
[quote]Swan wrote:
[quote]IBdaMann wrote:
[quote]Swan wrote:
...deleted your anal babble and repetition...
Quote everything three times like the anal-retentive turd that you are. No one cares about your refusal to accept science

Repetition fallacy (chanting). Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Discard of science. Redefinition fallacy (religion<->science). No argument presented.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan

While it is true that fossils do not burn it is also true that fossil fuels burn very well - Swan
Edited on 20-09-2022 01:20
20-09-2022 02:29
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Into the Night wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.

He need not ask. I will explain. Pay attention Swan.

An argument is a conclusion and a set of predicates.

A circular argument is one that uses it's own conclusion as a predicate. By itself it is not a fallacy. This type of argument is also known as the Argument of Faith. It is the basis of every religion.

If one tries to prove a circular argument True, they create the Circular Argument fallacy. It is not possible to prove any circular argument either True. Those that try this (particularly those that try to prove such an argument True), are fundamentalists. That's what fundamentalism is. The attempt to prove a circular argument True.

Well put.

Into the Night wrote:You, Swan, claim that an ice age occurred, even though you cannot go back in time to see it. You just claim it occurred, and claim these magick moraines are the result of it. This is fundamentalism. You are trying to prove a circular argument True. It is the basis of one of your religions. Indeed, it is the basis for ALL of your religions.

.
Attached image:

20-09-2022 03:48
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
Into the Night wrote:
Swan wrote:
[quote]Into the Night wrote:
[quote]Swan wrote:
[quote]IBdaMann wrote:
[quote]Swan wrote:
...deleted your anal babble and repetition...
Quote everything three times like the anal-retentive turd that you are. No one cares about your refusal to accept science

Repetition fallacy (chanting). Circular argument fallacy (fundamentalism). Discard of science. Redefinition fallacy (religion<->science). No argument presented.


LOL the woke bouncy ball calls me circular. So did you rape any little kids at Disneyworld today?


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
20-09-2022 03:53
SwanProfile picture★★★★★
(2133)
IBdaMann wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
Swan wrote:No need to travel back in time to observe the thousands of miles of terminal moraines

Whether or not they are even moraines, much less terminal moraines, absolutely requires you to travel back in time to verify in order to make the claim you are making.

Swan wrote: ... that the last ice age left because they are here now in the present.

Yet you still have not traveled back in time to verify this kooky theory of yours. You have no corroborating evidence. You only have your own WACKY declarations and KOOKY speculations to support your strange beliefs, and your strange beliefs are what dictate your declarations and speculations.

Do you know what a circular argument is? I highly recommend asking Into the Night to explain to you the kind of ground on which your argument rests.

LOL. LOL.

Too funny.

He need not ask. I will explain. Pay attention Swan.

An argument is a conclusion and a set of predicates.

A circular argument is one that uses it's own conclusion as a predicate. By itself it is not a fallacy. This type of argument is also known as the Argument of Faith. It is the basis of every religion.

If one tries to prove a circular argument True, they create the Circular Argument fallacy. It is not possible to prove any circular argument either True. Those that try this (particularly those that try to prove such an argument True), are fundamentalists. That's what fundamentalism is. The attempt to prove a circular argument True.

Well put.

Into the Night wrote:You, Swan, claim that an ice age occurred, even though you cannot go back in time to see it. You just claim it occurred, and claim these magick moraines are the result of it. This is fundamentalism. You are trying to prove a circular argument True. It is the basis of one of your religions. Indeed, it is the basis for ALL of your religions.

.


First, what is an ice age(opens in new tab)? It's when the Earth has cold temperatures for a long time — millions to tens of millions of years — that lead to ice sheets and glaciers covering large areas of its surface.

We know that the Earth has had at least five major ice ages(opens in new tab). The first one happened about 2 billion years ago and lasted about 300 million years. The most recent one started about 2.6 million years ago, and in fact, we are still technically in it.

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So why isn't the Earth covered in ice right now? It's because we are in a period known as an "interglacial." In an ice age, temperatures will fluctuate between colder and warmer levels. Ice sheets and glaciers melt during warmer phases, which are called interglacials, and expand during colder phases, which are called glacials.

Right now we are in the most recent ice age's warm interglacial period, which began about 11,000 years ago.


What was it like during the ice age?
When most people talk about the "ice age," they are usually referring to the last glacial period, which began about 115,000 years ago and ended about 11,000 years ago with the start of the current interglacial period.

During that time, the planet was much cooler than it is now. At its peak, when ice sheets covered most of North America, the average global temperature was about 46 degrees Fahrenheit(opens in new tab) (8 degrees Celsius). That's 11 degrees F (6 degrees C) cooler than the global annual average today.

That difference might not sound like a lot, but it resulted in most of North America and Eurasia being covered in ice sheets. Earth was also much drier, and sea level was much lower(opens in new tab), since most of the Earth's water was trapped in the ice sheets. Steppes(opens in new tab), or dry grassy plains, were common. So were savannas(opens in new tab), or warmer grassy plains and deserts.

Many animals present during the ice age(opens in new tab) would be familiar to you, including brown bears, caribou and wolves. But there were also megafauna that went extinct at the end of the ice age, like mammoths, mastodons, saber-toothed cats(opens in new tab) and giant ground sloths(opens in new tab).

There are different ideas about why these animals went extinct(opens in new tab). One is that humans hunted them into extinction when they came in contact with the megafauna.

Excavating a mastodon skeleton at Burning Tree Golf Course in Heath, Ohio, December 1989. The skeleton, found by workers who were digging a pond, was 90% to 95% complete and more than 11,000 years old.

Excavating a mastodon skeleton at Burning Tree Golf Course in Heath, Ohio, December 1989. The skeleton, found by workers who were digging a pond, was 90% to 95% complete and more than 11,000 years old. (Image credit: James St. John/Flickr, CC BY)
Wait, there were humans during the ice age?!
Yes, people just like us lived through the ice age. Since our species, Homo sapiens, emerged about 300,000 years ago in Africa(opens in new tab), we have spread around the world.

During the ice age, some populations remained in Africa and did not experience the full effects of the cold. Others moved into other parts of the world, including the cold, glacial environments of Europe.

And they weren't alone. At the beginning of the ice age, there were other species of hominins — a group that includes our immediate ancestors and our closest relatives — throughout Eurasia, like the Neanderthals(opens in new tab) in Europe and the mysterious Denisovans(opens in new tab) in Asia. Both of these groups seem to have gone extinct before the end of the ice age.

There are lots of ideas about how our species survived the ice age when our hominin cousins did not. Some think that it has to do with how adaptable we are, and how we used our social and communication skills and tools(opens in new tab). And it appears that humans didn't hunker down during the ice age. Instead they moved into new areas.

For a long time it was thought that humans did not enter North America until after the ice sheets started to melt. But fossilized footprints(opens in new tab) found at White Sands National Park(opens in new tab) in New Mexico show that humans have been in North America since at least 23,000 years ago — close to the peak of the last ice age

Now quote everything one by one because you need to to prove your worth to the grand poobah


This place is quieter than the FBI commenting on the chink bank account information on Hunter Xiden's laptop

I LOVE TRUMP BECAUSE HE PISSES OFF ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I CAN'T STAND.

ULTRA MAGA

Now be honest, was I correct or was I correct? LOL
20-09-2022 05:20
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(12584)
Swan wrote:First, what is an ice age?

Hopefully your definition will be unambiguous.

Swan wrote:It's when the Earth has cold temperatures for a long time — millions to tens of millions of years — that lead to ice sheets and glaciers covering large areas of its surface.

So we're in an ice age right now, and the term is meaningless.

Swan wrote:We know that the Earth has had at least five major ice ages.

Nope. By your definition, the earth has been in one insanely long ice age.

Swan wrote:So why isn't the Earth covered in ice right now? It's because we are in a period known as an "interglacial."

Nope. According to your definition, we are still in that one, never-ending ice age.

This is what happens when you render a term meaningless with ambiguity.

Swan wrote:What is it like during the ice age?

I think we can all look outside and see for ourselves

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