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Does Anyone Know Anything about Polyphenols?


Does Anyone Know Anything about Polyphenols?02-05-2024 19:23
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14537)
Why is pine litter so effective at eliminating cat urine odors, but rather ineffective at eliminating cat feces odors?
02-05-2024 20:31
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
Lack of moisture in feces.

Cats generally don't like pine litter anyway. They prefer sand, burying their excretions.
02-05-2024 20:50
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(14537)
Into the Night wrote: Lack of moisture in feces.

What is it about pine litter that makes it effective against cat urine odors? I get that the urine has more water, but what makes the pine litter work?

Into the Night wrote:Cats generally don't like pine litter anyway. They prefer sand, burying their excretions.

Sand doesn't control odors quite as well.

So overall you nonetheless recommend sand?


Oh, take a wild guess at who implied via PM that he wouldn't be participating in my thread. I won't tell you who, but I don't think he actually knows anything about polyphenols to contribute to the discussion in any meaningful way.
02-05-2024 21:14
Im a BM
★★★☆☆
(791)
Into the Night wrote:
Lack of moisture in feces.

Cats generally don't like pine litter anyway. They prefer sand, burying their excretions.









I don't think that it is YOUR attention that is being sought so desperately.
02-05-2024 22:39
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(21962)
IBdaMann wrote:
Into the Night wrote: Lack of moisture in feces.

What is it about pine litter that makes it effective against cat urine odors? I get that the urine has more water, but what makes the pine litter work?

Absorption. The urine also breaks down the pine litter into a sawdust consistency as it composts.
Into the Night wrote:Cats generally don't like pine litter anyway. They prefer sand, burying their excretions.

Sand doesn't control odors quite as well.[/quote]
Cats prefer sand. Dichotomous (clumping) litter is tolerated because it's mixed with sand. As the cat buries their excretions, the litter tends to get kicked out of the box. Pine litter is usually easier to clean up than the sand.

In all cases, the key controlling odor is to keep the litter box clear of urine and feces.

IBdaMann wrote:
So overall you nonetheless recommend sand?

Most cats live in sandy areas, and this is what the species has built an instinct to do; bury their excretions. It's useful when the whole world is your litter box, and it helps to limit detection of the cat's presence by their prey

Domestic cats, of course have to deal with the artificial conditions of a small litterbox.

Sand is easy to dig in and quite benign.

Pine litter works, and some cats do live in forests, but the breakdown of pine (or any other wood) to sawdust can cause allergic reactions to some people. Pine can be particularly problematic in this regard, due to the oils in the wood. Most cats have no problem with pine litter.

Dichotomous (clumping) litter has sand mixed in it to give the cat something they can easily dig in. Dichotomous earth, after all, is a clay and naturally hardens in the presence of moisture (even humidity). Even compacting it with a ram will create some pretty hard and relatively fireproof material. That's why you find it on model rocket engine nozzles.

Plain sand is what most cats like to use in the wild.

IBdaMann wrote:
Oh, take a wild guess at who implied via PM that he wouldn't be participating in my thread. I won't tell you who, but I don't think he actually knows anything about polyphenols to contribute to the discussion in any meaningful way.


It's not the polyphenols that make much difference here (other than triggering an allergy in some people and even some cats). The pine litter is made of compressed pellets to make it attractive for the cat. They simply become uncompressed in the presence of moisture, carrying the urine to the bottom of the box with it.

I let my cats out much of the time. They take care of most of their business out there, leaving much less of a mess in the litterbox. I bring them in at night to protect them from coyotes in the area. With this routine, they are most active during morning and evening hours, and don't keep people up at night with their activity. Like most cats, they generally snooze through most of the day.


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