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12-12-2020 20:00
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.
12-12-2020 20:43
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(9086)
James___ wrote: Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side.

Could you elaborate on this point?

Mountains are not known for increasing atmospheric pressure.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
12-12-2020 20:58
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
12-12-2020 21:01
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
IBdaMann wrote:
James___ wrote: Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side.

Could you elaborate on this point?

Mountains are not known for increasing atmospheric pressure.

.


Actually, they do...on the leeward side (surface pressure).

Air has mass. As air flows over mountains, the descending air actually compresses due to inertia. This can make it quite warm on the leeward side of mountains in the right conditions (certain wind speeds related to the shape and width the mountain range involved). Higher or lower wind speeds can simply cause turbulence instead, and not significantly change pressure on either side of the mountains.

Mountain wave compression is a known phenomena. It can happen fair number of times right here in the Cascade mountains and has been known to increase temperatures as much as 30 deg F in the vicinity of the leeward compression wave. You can almost think of it like a wing in ground effect.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
Edited on 12-12-2020 21:04
12-12-2020 21:05
IBdaMannProfile picture★★★★★
(9086)
Into the Night wrote:Actually, they do...on the leeward side (surface pressure).

That's kind of why I was asking for clarification.

Mountains don't cause a change in atmospheric pressure.

Differences in windspeed cause difference in pressure. It's why wings work and why airplanes can fly.

Otherwise the existence of a mountain does not itself change atmospheric pressure.

.


A Spaghetti strainer with the faucet running, retains water- tmiddles

Clouds don't trap heat. Clouds block cold. - Spongy Iris

Printing dollars to pay debt doesn't increase the number of dollars. - keepit

If Venus were a black body it would have a much much lower temperature than what we found there.- tmiddles

Ah the "Valid Data" myth of ITN/IBD. - tmiddles

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
13-12-2020 13:08
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
IBdaMann wrote:
Into the Night wrote:Actually, they do...on the leeward side (surface pressure).

That's kind of why I was asking for clarification.

Mountains don't cause a change in atmospheric pressure.

Differences in windspeed cause difference in pressure. It's why wings work and why airplanes can fly.

Otherwise the existence of a mountain does not itself change atmospheric pressure.

.


Not overall pressure, no.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
15-12-2020 21:23
Spongy Iris
★★★☆☆
(584)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.


15-12-2020 23:09
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
15-12-2020 23:33
Spongy Iris
★★★☆☆
(584)
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


16-12-2020 00:21
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
Edited on 16-12-2020 00:22
16-12-2020 02:10
Spongy Iris
★★★☆☆
(584)
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."


16-12-2020 04:14
GasGuzzlerProfile picture★★★★★
(2108)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."


Not the same thing.

James is trying to describe compressional heating, but he's all a mess.

A warm front will tend to have the warm air ride up over top of the cooler air at the surface. The cooler air is more dense and the warmer cannot immediately displace the cooler air. This is called a temperature inversion because it is backwards from typical airmasses that are cooler with height.

Compressional heating is quite something when wind conditions are right. As cooler air is forced down the mountain slopes, it is compressed and warmed. I have experienced 70 degree Iowa weather in February due to compressional heating off the Rockies. Average Iowa Feb temp is 30-35F, so it is always welcome here in the winter.


ANY mask is better than no mask, even if you have to resort to putting a tightly fit plastic bag over your head-COVIDEXPERTGFM

I don't have a GoFundMe, but I do have a PO Box (#666)-COVIDEXPERTGFM
16-12-2020 04:38
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
GasGuzzler wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."


Not the same thing.

James is trying to describe compressional heating, but he's all a mess.

A warm front will tend to have the warm air ride up over top of the cooler air at the surface. The cooler air is more dense and the warmer cannot immediately displace the cooler air. This is called a temperature inversion because it is backwards from typical airmasses that are cooler with height.

Compressional heating is quite something when wind conditions are right. As cooler air is forced down the mountain slopes, it is compressed and warmed. I have experienced 70 degree Iowa weather in February due to compressional heating off the Rockies. Average Iowa Feb temp is 30-35F, so it is always welcome here in the winter.



He's talking on the windward and not leeward side. Why there was frost on the ground. With it being a little cloudy around the summit, water vapor occupies a lot more space than ice crystals do.
In the winter when the wind goes over a mountain, it won't compress on the leeward side. All you need to consider is Washington State. When it snows in eastern Washington, the wind is coming from Canada. When it's coming over the Cascades from western Washington, eastern Washington will have clear skies and colder weather.
And in the summer, eastern Washington will be warmer.
I decided to include today's jet stream and wind speeds across the US. Was kind of wondering why it's going to be cold where I live. On the right of the image is wind speed in knots.
If anyone looks at this link, it's snowing where the wind speeds are the slowest. A lot of cold air coming down from Canada. And in another day or 2, it should be snowing from around Washington, DC to Boston and maybe up into Maine, etc.
https://weatherstreet.com/weather-map-us.htm
And this concludes today's and all other day's lesson in what helps to create the weather.
Attached image:


Edited on 16-12-2020 05:02
16-12-2020 05:25
GasGuzzlerProfile picture★★★★★
(2108)
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."


Not the same thing.

James is trying to describe compressional heating, but he's all a mess.

A warm front will tend to have the warm air ride up over top of the cooler air at the surface. The cooler air is more dense and the warmer cannot immediately displace the cooler air. This is called a temperature inversion because it is backwards from typical airmasses that are cooler with height.

Compressional heating is quite something when wind conditions are right. As cooler air is forced down the mountain slopes, it is compressed and warmed. I have experienced 70 degree Iowa weather in February due to compressional heating off the Rockies. Average Iowa Feb temp is 30-35F, so it is always welcome here in the winter.


In the winter when the wind goes over a mountain, it won't compress on the leeward side.


I suppose your going to tell me that in the winter it must conserve its heat energy until it can become east coast waste heat. Am I close?



ANY mask is better than no mask, even if you have to resort to putting a tightly fit plastic bag over your head-COVIDEXPERTGFM

I don't have a GoFundMe, but I do have a PO Box (#666)-COVIDEXPERTGFM
16-12-2020 06:40
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
GasGuzzler wrote:
James___ wrote:
GasGuzzler wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."


Not the same thing.

James is trying to describe compressional heating, but he's all a mess.

A warm front will tend to have the warm air ride up over top of the cooler air at the surface. The cooler air is more dense and the warmer cannot immediately displace the cooler air. This is called a temperature inversion because it is backwards from typical airmasses that are cooler with height.

Compressional heating is quite something when wind conditions are right. As cooler air is forced down the mountain slopes, it is compressed and warmed. I have experienced 70 degree Iowa weather in February due to compressional heating off the Rockies. Average Iowa Feb temp is 30-35F, so it is always welcome here in the winter.


In the winter when the wind goes over a mountain, it won't compress on the leeward side.


I suppose your going to tell me that in the winter it must conserve its heat energy until it can become east coast waste heat. Am I close?




You should take the time to learn something. As I just posted, cold air from Canada is circulating thru the MidWest and then help it to snow along the east coast. How is that conserving heat? Just looking for someone to goad? Seems to be about it.

If you look at the wind speed map, it's going over mountains and is drawing air south from Canada and we're back to it will snow on the east coast. Please learn to read. Then you won't look like a fool for asking about something posted to you.
Edited on 16-12-2020 07:17
16-12-2020 07:32
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
If you look at the wind going over the Sierra Nevada and then the Rocky Mountains, notice how it's trending south where it's warmer? Not conserving heat content. It's looking for it and it's right there in the map.
And if you look closely, with Oregon, it's the Cascades and then rides the Rocky Mountains south. I think everyone knows that Pie Town, New Mexico is on the continental divide.
Take some time to see how wind that passes over mountains heads towards warmer climates or at least where there's more solar radiation.
Attached image:


Edited on 16-12-2020 07:37
16-12-2020 09:40
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3368)
Except... Florida don't have any mountains, and we are a good piece from Canada. No good damn reason for it to get down in the 30s and 40s in Florida.
16-12-2020 11:49
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Spongy Iris wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Mountains are known to increase atmospheric air pressure on the windward side. Typically speaking, warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side.

You have it backwards.


We had 4 freezing mornings Nov, 9, 28, 29, 30 where temps reached the low 30s.

We are less than 10 miles south of Mt Diablo summit (not considering winding road which is a longer drive).

Our elevation less than 500 ft, Mt Diablo elevation more than 3800 ft.

I checked the lows on Mt Diablo for those freezing mornings, and they were consistently around 10 degrees higher than us, with lows in the 40s.

The weather was slightly cloudy at the summit and clear on the ground. Indeed the atmospheric pressure appears to have been higher at the summit than on the ground on these cold days.

Clouds are not pressure.
Temperature is not pressure.


Why don't you explain why it was not as cold at the top of mountain than at the bottom of the mountain, instead of deflecting with word games?


A temperature inversion. It happens from time to time, usually when a warm front is passing through. I am not playing word games.


Is that not the same thing as the following statement which you just denied?

"warmer, drier air will rise and move to the leeward side (think of thermals on a larger scale). This in turn can lower the temperature and dew point at ground level on the windward side."

No.

A warm front is warmer air moving in over colder air. Air of different temperatures or humidity won't mix well (kind of like oil and water). Warm air rises, so the warmer air climbs up and over the top of the colder air beneath it. This creates a temperature inversion. Such conditions are usually noted by fog or haze near the ground and light wind conditions. Such fog or haze is usually on a thousand feet high or so, with clear air above that. Clouds may and often do form at the boundary as stratus clouds, but they might not form at all, leaving clear skies.

These fronts are usually slow moving. The air mass is very stable.

As the front passes, look for warmer temperatures at lower altitudes as well, when the temperature inversion passes with it.

If clouds do form and it does rain, the rain is usually only a drizzle at most. Warm fronts have no real teeth. Their biggest danger is to aircraft, because of reduced visibility at low altitudes that are often prevalent under such conditions, or to ships at sea, since they can't see other ships and must rely on horns and radar. The haze and fog can get thick enough to affect highway traffic, possibly even causing a chain accident.

Of course, if clouds do not form, it can be gorgeous flying conditions are sea conditions (except for sailboats, due to the light winds).


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
16-12-2020 11:52
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
James___ wrote:
If you look at the wind going over the Sierra Nevada and then the Rocky Mountains, notice how it's trending south where it's warmer? Not conserving heat content. It's looking for it and it's right there in the map.
And if you look closely, with Oregon, it's the Cascades and then rides the Rocky Mountains south. I think everyone knows that Pie Town, New Mexico is on the continental divide.
Take some time to see how wind that passes over mountains heads towards warmer climates or at least where there's more solar radiation.

This is a snapshot. It is not continuous conditions.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
16-12-2020 12:01
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Except... Florida don't have any mountains, and we are a good piece from Canada. No good damn reason for it to get down in the 30s and 40s in Florida.


It happens from time to time during a winter. Apparently this one was caused by a cold front that is moving through. It won't last long. Soon you'll be back to your usual sunny self!



The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit

nuclear powered ships do not require nuclear fuel. - Swan
Edited on 16-12-2020 12:03
16-12-2020 17:00
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Except... Florida don't have any mountains, and we are a good piece from Canada. No good damn reason for it to get down in the 30s and 40s in Florida.



Barometric pressure is lower than usual. Look inside the red circle. Air pressure is 1012 millibars. Why it cools at night.

And if anyone notices, high pressure systems are moving into the MidWest.
Attached image:


Edited on 16-12-2020 17:04
16-12-2020 17:18
James___
★★★★★
(4478)
This wind map shows how wind direction and speed has changed because of all of the cold Canadian air that moved down into the US. Low pressure areas like what is seen in Florida has little or no wind speed.
Warm air rising over north of Denver can be seen moving faster and then slowing and moving north. And this map will be updated every time they download a new forecast.

http://hint.fm/wind/

And if anyone can handle it, the jet stream today. And if anyone notices, the dip in the air stream is now a little southeast of Iowa (St. Louis). And the jet stream when moving past Seattle/Vancouver, B.C. heads towards Denver.
You can actually see how the jet stream moving northeast of Louisiana influences surface wind conditions. I think it's kind of cool but can't speak for you guys.
Attached image:


Edited on 16-12-2020 17:32
16-12-2020 17:52
gfm7175Profile picture★★★★★
(2051)
Into the Night wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Except... Florida don't have any mountains, and we are a good piece from Canada. No good damn reason for it to get down in the 30s and 40s in Florida.


It happens from time to time during a winter. Apparently this one was caused by a cold front that is moving through. It won't last long. Soon you'll be back to your usual sunny self!

For the upcoming week (from today), my area MIGHT barely reach 40 for one day, otherwise it is forecasted to remain in the low to mid 30s... That's actually a tad warm for south-central WI for this time of year... I'll take it while it lasts!
After all, here in Ice Bowl land, there very well could be a '-' in front of those numbers...
16-12-2020 19:33
HarveyH55Profile picture★★★★★
(3368)
As a kid out west, we only got into the low teens a couple of winters. Didn't really make much difference, freezing cold, is still freezing cold, an you still had to go out and do you chores. least, it wasn't wet, and cold... I just kid about the cold in Florida. Haven't worn a coat in years. Use to have a light jacket, for walking the dog, 2:00 AM, but that was about 10 years ago. I do wear long sleeves, sometimes, maybe a sweatshirt. Been in Florida almost 40 years now, some people think I'm a little crazy. Just doesn't get dangerous cold here, a little uncomfortable, occasionally. Not something to worry over though, since I grew up where hypothermia and frostbite was a real thing, if you weren't careful, or prepared.

I just want to point out, that mountains don't make that big a difference. It's the wind moving the cold. Just like summer heat, doesn't just come from the sun shining down.
16-12-2020 20:55
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(15506)
James___ wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Except... Florida don't have any mountains, and we are a good piece from Canada. No good damn reason for it to get down in the 30s and 40s in Florida.



Barometric pressure is lower than usual. Look inside the red circle. Air pressure is 1012 millibars. Why it cools at night.

And if anyone notices, high pressure systems are moving into the MidWest.

Pressure is not temperature, James.


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