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Cloud Seeding with sodium chloride


Cloud Seeding with sodium chloride04-01-2020 11:50
Maxyboy
☆☆☆☆☆
(1)
Hi guys and girls

First time here on this forum. Just wanted to get some views on the following topic:

Today reading the BBC I came across an article about Jakarta having flooding and lots of rain. Apparently the government there is trying to stop the rain by shooting sodium chloride flares into clouds.
Does this procedure actually work and does it have any negative impacts on weather patterns and climate ?
04-01-2020 20:22
HarveyH55
★★★★★
(2702)
Maxyboy wrote:
Hi guys and girls

First time here on this forum. Just wanted to get some views on the following topic:

Today reading the BBC I came across an article about Jakarta having flooding and lots of rain. Apparently the government there is trying to stop the rain by shooting sodium chloride flares into clouds.
Does this procedure actually work and does it have any negative impacts on weather patterns and climate ?


Sodium Chloride is common table salt... A lot of plants don't tolerate a lot of salt in their diet. Probably not a great idea for the food supply, irrigating with seawater...

They tried cloud seeding, to make it rain, think they used Silver Iodine, probably several other things. Didn't produce significant results. The clouds and conditions had to already be present for rain. They couldn't consistently prove seeding, did encourage the rain, or if was going to rain naturally, anyway. They stopped, mostly because the chemicals they used to seed with, were building up in the soil, and not a healthy thing for the environment.

I've got a hunch they won't have any better success at stopping the rain. Flooding these days, is mostly related to land development, and poor storm water management, planning and maintenance. People want the homes and cities built as cheaply as possible, so they ignore things that cost money, that only provide occasional benefits. I live in a similar environment/climate, Florida. We get flooding on occasion, but generally, it's poorly maintained storm water management. Vegetation needs to be constantly cleared. It cost money, but also it's not feasible during certain times of the year, like frequent, heavy rain. Hard to clear ditches, canals and storm drains, while in use.
04-01-2020 20:56
James___
★★★★★
(3429)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Maxyboy wrote:
Hi guys and girls

First time here on this forum. Just wanted to get some views on the following topic:

Today reading the BBC I came across an article about Jakarta having flooding and lots of rain. Apparently the government there is trying to stop the rain by shooting sodium chloride flares into clouds.
Does this procedure actually work and does it have any negative impacts on weather patterns and climate ?


Sodium Chloride is common table salt... A lot of plants don't tolerate a lot of salt in their diet. Probably not a great idea for the food supply, irrigating with seawater...

They tried cloud seeding, to make it rain, think they used Silver Iodine, probably several other things. Didn't produce significant results. The clouds and conditions had to already be present for rain. They couldn't consistently prove seeding, did encourage the rain, or if was going to rain naturally, anyway. They stopped, mostly because the chemicals they used to seed with, were building up in the soil, and not a healthy thing for the environment.

I've got a hunch they won't have any better success at stopping the rain. Flooding these days, is mostly related to land development, and poor storm water management, planning and maintenance. People want the homes and cities built as cheaply as possible, so they ignore things that cost money, that only provide occasional benefits. I live in a similar environment/climate, Florida. We get flooding on occasion, but generally, it's poorly maintained storm water management. Vegetation needs to be constantly cleared. It cost money, but also it's not feasible during certain times of the year, like frequent, heavy rain. Hard to clear ditches, canals and storm drains, while in use.


Mmm, in the future they'll probably use reduced salt sea water for irrigation. Many plants can tolerate elevated salinity levels. And with the world population what it is and the need for more agriculture with less fresh water available, it'll probably mean GMO or going hungry.
And his question was if salt in clouds decreased and not increased rainfall. Since it is being done there is some science behind the effort. Salt might help to keep the water molecules in the clouds excited. It does allow electricity to pass through water more readily.
At the same time it might increase rainfall by exciting some water molecules which as a domino effect goes could cause other water molecules to condense.
Conservation of energy would suggest increased rainfall. But then when the weather system moves on, it would rain less. That might be what they're trying. And with Jakarta, the weather system would be over the ocean anyway so the salt in the rain water wouldn't matter.




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