Remember me
▼ Content

Climate Change Dishonesty



Page 2 of 2<12
27-03-2017 01:03
Surface Detail
★★★★☆
(1673)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.
27-03-2017 20:37
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8694)
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.


The Parrot Killer
27-03-2017 23:55
Surface Detail
★★★★☆
(1673)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.
28-03-2017 01:30
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8694)
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?


The Parrot Killer
28-03-2017 01:38
Surface Detail
★★★★☆
(1673)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?

I'm afraid your failure to follow the point of the discussion marks you as the more cognitively challenged of the two of us.
28-03-2017 01:44
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8694)
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Wake wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You claimed this paper uses calculus:

http://www.biocab.org/Overlapping_Absorption_Bands.pdf

It doesn't. You are an idiot.



Definition of calculus
plural calculiplay \-ˌlī, -ˌlē\ also calculuses
1
a : a method of computation or calculation in a special notation (as of logic or symbolic logic)

You could teach stupid lessons to a snail.

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?

I'm afraid your failure to follow the point of the discussion marks you as the more cognitively challenged of the two of us.

Okay. You don't want to continue with the context. You would rather just attack people on a personal level. Done here.


The Parrot Killer
28-03-2017 02:41
Surface Detail
★★★★☆
(1673)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?

I'm afraid your failure to follow the point of the discussion marks you as the more cognitively challenged of the two of us.

Okay. You don't want to continue with the context. You would rather just attack people on a personal level. Done here.

I'm happy to continue the discussion. Stupid, idiot, tiny brain - that was your post. You can give it, but you can't take it, can you?
28-03-2017 03:05
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8694)
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?

I'm afraid your failure to follow the point of the discussion marks you as the more cognitively challenged of the two of us.

Okay. You don't want to continue with the context. You would rather just attack people on a personal level. Done here.

I'm happy to continue the discussion. Stupid, idiot, tiny brain - that was your post. You can give it, but you can't take it, can you?

You obviously aren't. You can let me know by dropping the childish remarks.


The Parrot Killer
28-03-2017 03:12
Surface Detail
★★★★☆
(1673)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:
You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.


Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.

That's simply wrong. Long division is a fixed procedure in mathematics, but nobody would describe that as calculus.


Wrong. Long division is an binomial operator in mathematics. It is not a procedure. It is one thing that can make up procedures.

Long division is a procedure for performing division. It is division itself that is a binary (not binomial!) operator. None of this is calculus.


Okay stupid. Do you want to quibble about how you write stuff down doing a division? What an idiot.

Why don't you zero your tiny brain in on something else a little more productive?

I'm afraid your failure to follow the point of the discussion marks you as the more cognitively challenged of the two of us.

Okay. You don't want to continue with the context. You would rather just attack people on a personal level. Done here.

I'm happy to continue the discussion. Stupid, idiot, tiny brain - that was your post. You can give it, but you can't take it, can you?

You obviously aren't. You can let me know by dropping the childish remarks.

You seem confused. It is you who decided to start making childish remarks, as I pointed out. It was you who used the words "stupid", "idiot" and "tiny brain", wasn't it?

Now, are you still claiming that long division is a form of calculus, or not?
28-03-2017 03:24
litesong
★★★★★
(2297)
Surface Detail wrote:.... are you still claiming that long division is a form of calculus...

You misunderstand him. To him, long division is as hard to UNDERSTAND as calculus.
28-03-2017 03:42
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8694)
litesong wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:.... are you still claiming that long division is a form of calculus...

You misunderstand him. To him, long division is as hard to UNDERSTAND as calculus.


STILL stuck in your rut, eh Litebeer?


The Parrot Killer
28-03-2017 04:40
litesong
★★★★★
(2297)
Robert Scribbler tells of dishonest, oil funded Lamar Smith, the present head of the House Science Committee, doing his un-"sigh-ants" in the Science Committee:
https://robertscribbler.com/
From the article:
.....honest climate scientists have for decades dutifully reported on the deteriorating state of the global climate in the least political fashion possible..... They have worked for wages ranging from that of the average school teacher to less than your typical IT professional (a starting salary of often less than 50,000 dollars per year). In other words, they didn't, as some have so ridiculously claimed, do it for the money.
But the very industry that is dumping billions and billions of tons of heat-trapping carbon into the Earth's atmosphere and making billions and billions of dollars in profits (oil company CEOs can make between 15 and 150 million dollars per year) doing it, is paying politicians like Lamar Smith (who has a net worth of 4.5 million) to lead an entirely false and fact-free legislative attack against these scientists.
03-04-2017 17:51
Wake
★★★★★
(4026)
Into the Night wrote:
Surface Detail wrote:

Calculiplay? Really? Looks like someone messed up his cutting and pasting


Two points:
1) I don't see any special notation in that paper. It looks like straightforward arithmetic to me. Not that it makes much sense, though.

2) You missed out the second, more specific, part of the definition:
b : the mathematical methods comprising differential and integral calculus
which is what any physicist or mathematician is invariably referring to when talking of calculus.

If you claim a paper contains calculus, then you are implying that it contains integral or differential equations. See Calculus.


This is even better - you aren't even smart enough to look it up in the Websters Dictionary. But as an ass you are even funnier where you would grab one of several definitions in order to PROVE your point. And then pretend that there is no other definition. But guess what? You've only proven yourself to be even more stupid that most people assumed from your postings.

You are being ridiculous. You are aware, I take it, that words have different meanings in different contexts? If I said that 123 is a 3-digit number, would you assume I meant digit as in finger? Of course not.

Similarly, calculus has a very definite meaning in maths and science: it means the branch of maths dealing with rates of change, i.e. differentiation and integration. Laypeople may use the term to mean "tricky maths", but nobody with an education would refer to a scientific paper as containing calculus if it didn't contain differential or integral equations.[/quote]

Obviously, one who has never studied the etymology of words.

There is no 'math' version of 'calculus'. It's ALL math. There is no 'science' version of 'calculus'. It is math, not science.

The word 'calculus' comes from the meaning 'to count' or 'to sum'. It's current meaning not only means a particular branch of mathematics dealing with smaller and smaller summations, but is also used to describe any fixed procedure in mathematics.

Yes...it has more than one meaning.[/quote]

You are doing no more than casting bread to pigeons who are smart enough to eat if but not smart enough to bake their own.
Page 2 of 2<12





Join the debate Climate Change Dishonesty:

Remember me

▲ Top of page
Public Poll
Who is leading the renewable energy race?

US

EU

China

Japan

India

Brazil

Other

Don't know


Thanks for supporting Climate-Debate.com.
Copyright © 2009-2019 Climate-Debate.com | About | Contact