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Can mankind control Earth's climate?


Can mankind control Earth's climate?23-12-2015 02:17
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1079)
Let's say the Sun goes into another dormant phase with very few sunspots, and the Earth goes into the next little ice age lasting hundreds of years, what can mankind do to increase temperature to prevent famine and black death like what happened in the last little ice age?

http://astronomynow.com/2015/07/17/diminishing-solar-activity-may-bring-new-ice-age-by-2030/
Edited on 23-12-2015 02:18
23-12-2015 12:16
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1295)
The black death is not a thing of the ice age.

The lower output of the sun will only slightly lower the earth's temperatures. This will, at worst, cause a slight cooling which is a negative thing but not that bad.

The best thing we could od would be to stop using food as fuel and thus stop the unnecessary slow starvation of the world's poorest billion people.

Edited on 23-12-2015 12:16
23-12-2015 16:44
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1079)
Tim the plumber wrote:
The black death is not a thing of the ice age.

The lower output of the sun will only slightly lower the earth's temperatures. This will, at worst, cause a slight cooling which is a negative thing but not that bad.

The best thing we could od would be to stop using food as fuel and thus stop the unnecessary slow starvation of the world's poorest billion people.


A slight cooling? Not bad? The Thames was frozen over during the last little ice age for heaven's sake. Such a scenario would wipe out more than 80% of America's crops since farming states like Iowa would be unable to grow crops. The sun has 11 year cycles, 200 year cycles that cause little ice ages and little warm periods, 20,000 year cycles that cause long ice ages and long warm periods. The sun is not a uniform ball of hydrogen and helium. It has layers. That's why it has cycles. Earth's climate is entirely driven by the sun's cycles, has nothing to do with Milankovitch cycles.
Edited on 23-12-2015 17:04
23-12-2015 17:30
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1295)
Did the crops in America not grow in 1820?

I said not that bad.

Today we can grow food in lots of ways and move it around the globe easily. It would be bad if there was a little cooling but not disasterous.

Clearly you know loads more about the internal workings of the sun than anybody else in the world. You do not know anything about orbital mechanics and the effect that the changes to the earth's tilt have upon the earth though.

Edited on 23-12-2015 17:30
23-12-2015 17:58
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1079)
Tim the plumber wrote:
Did the crops in America not grow in 1820?

I said not that bad.

Today we can grow food in lots of ways and move it around the globe easily. It would be bad if there was a little cooling but not disasterous.

Clearly you know loads more about the internal workings of the sun than anybody else in the world. You do not know anything about orbital mechanics and the effect that the changes to the earth's tilt have upon the earth though.


What was the population in 1820? What is the population today? 1820 was after the last little ice age. No crops could grow in America in the 1600s and early 1700s during the last little ice age. The same will happen in the coming little ice age.

Milankovitch cycles do not affect the net solar reception of Earth. They do not cause changes in climate. Only changes in the Sun's output because of the Sun's various cycles can cause changes in climate.
Edited on 23-12-2015 18:00
23-12-2015 18:26
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1295)
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Did the crops in America not grow in 1820?

I said not that bad.

Today we can grow food in lots of ways and move it around the globe easily. It would be bad if there was a little cooling but not disasterous.

Clearly you know loads more about the internal workings of the sun than anybody else in the world. You do not know anything about orbital mechanics and the effect that the changes to the earth's tilt have upon the earth though.


What was the population in 1820? What is the population today? 1820 was after the last little ice age. No crops could grow in America in the 1600s and early 1700s during the last little ice age. The same will happen in the coming little ice age.

Milankovitch cycles do not affect the net solar reception of Earth. They do not cause changes in climate. Only changes in the Sun's output because of the Sun's various cycles can cause changes in climate.


River Thames frost fairs were held on the tideway of the River Thames at London in some winters between the 17th century and early 19th century, during the


Did the locals all starve in 1600 or were they still there when the Mayfower landed in 1620 and the colonists started growing things?
23-12-2015 18:37
Tai Hai Chen
★★★★☆
(1079)
Tim the plumber wrote:
Tai Hai Chen wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Did the crops in America not grow in 1820?

I said not that bad.

Today we can grow food in lots of ways and move it around the globe easily. It would be bad if there was a little cooling but not disasterous.

Clearly you know loads more about the internal workings of the sun than anybody else in the world. You do not know anything about orbital mechanics and the effect that the changes to the earth's tilt have upon the earth though.


What was the population in 1820? What is the population today? 1820 was after the last little ice age. No crops could grow in America in the 1600s and early 1700s during the last little ice age. The same will happen in the coming little ice age.

Milankovitch cycles do not affect the net solar reception of Earth. They do not cause changes in climate. Only changes in the Sun's output because of the Sun's various cycles can cause changes in climate.


River Thames frost fairs were held on the tideway of the River Thames at London in some winters between the 17th century and early 19th century, during the


Did the locals all starve in 1600 or were they still there when the Mayfower landed in 1620 and the colonists started growing things?


Iowa would have been unable to grow crops in the 1600s. Only the coastal areas was able to grow some crops in the summers in the 1600s. In the 1600s was the little ice age. New York was like -15 C in December back then compared to like 15 C in December today.
Edited on 23-12-2015 18:42




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