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Bahamas


Bahamas08-09-2019 03:36
keepit
★★★☆☆
(713)
Should the Bahamians rebuild or just relocate?
I remember being in Biloxi right after Hurricane Katrina. They took years to rebuild. I don't think they have competel;y rebuilt but i'm not sure. And they had the big money form the casinos making rebuild happen not to mention the us economy.
The bahamas doesn't have such an advantage and from what i've seen in pictures and projected death toll dorian is worse.
If i was a bahamian i would take the insurance money and run!
Edited on 08-09-2019 03:37
08-09-2019 04:00
tmiddlesProfile picture★★★★☆
(1394)
keepit wrote:
Should the Bahamians rebuild


Well the beach is still there. Just rebuild knowing your place might be temporary

08-09-2019 04:19
keepit
★★★☆☆
(713)
I take it that is the Bahamas but i don't understand your sentence.
08-09-2019 06:38
tmiddlesProfile picture★★★★☆
(1394)
keepit wrote:i don't understand your sentence.


Oh just that 95% of what's valuable in the photo isn't the shacks on beach. I mean it's not like you have to rebuild manhattan.
Edited on 08-09-2019 06:48
08-09-2019 07:15
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1482)
They'll rebuild, and it probably won't take years either. Getting slammed like that, is rare, and they'll figure it's not going to happen again for a long while. Different culture...
08-09-2019 09:25
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9878)
keepit wrote:
Should the Bahamians rebuild or just relocate?

They will decide for themselves. Some are moving out, others are staying to rebuild.
keepit wrote:
I remember being in Biloxi right after Hurricane Katrina.

So do I. I've been to Biloxi both before and after Katrina.
keepit wrote:
They took years to rebuild.

Not really. Biloxi was pretty well cleaned up and running normally in less than a year. There were just cleaning up some of the water damage. That's what takes the time.
keepit wrote:
I don't think they have competel;y rebuilt but i'm not sure.

They did not completely rebuild (Few hurricane towns do). They removed older structures rather than repairing the water damage, and built new ones in their place.
keepit wrote:
And they had the big money form the casinos making rebuild happen not to mention the us economy.

The Bahamas have casinos.
keepit wrote:
The bahamas doesn't have such an advantage and from what i've seen in pictures and projected death toll dorian is worse.

The Bahamas have casinos.

Yes, the death toll is high and the damage is pretty extensive, but they will rebuild. Freeport airport has already been rebuilt a couple of times because of hurricane damage. They'll just do it again.
keepit wrote:
If i was a bahamian i would take the insurance money and run!

Some are, some are staying to rebuild.


The Parrot Killer
08-09-2019 09:26
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9878)
tmiddles wrote:
keepit wrote:
Should the Bahamians rebuild


Well the beach is still there. Just rebuild knowing your place might be temporary



See those houses on the beach? They are still standing.


The Parrot Killer
08-09-2019 09:30
tmiddlesProfile picture★★★★☆
(1394)
Into the Night wrote:
They are still standing.


Missing some roofs
08-09-2019 10:50
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9878)
tmiddles wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
They are still standing.


Missing some roofs


Missing some houses too.


The Parrot Killer
08-09-2019 21:10
HarveyH55
★★★★☆
(1482)
You do realize that buildings can be built to resist even Cat 5 storms. In Florida, it's been law for quite some time, that new construction be able to hold up to Cat 3 winds. Most of the buildings you see standing in the destruction pictures, are businesses, or homes of wealthy folks from other countries. The working class folks don't have the cash to build like that, or even insurance. Cruise ships like the Bahamas, as it's close enough to Florida for a weekend cruise, which are very popular. The cruise ship lines need a few places for their passengers to play in, while the stop off there. They don't want to spend construction/repair money every storm, or have an interruption in business. Cruises are book months in advance, they are losing money, well not much, just a re-route. But, the more stops they can fit in, breaks up the monotony of being on the ship for long periods, keeps it interesting.

People use to build things to last. My house was built in 1946, and hasn't experience any serious damage. At some point, people got real cheap, guessing that insurance and disaster relief money, made more sense, than build something that would last. Thinking, it's also much easier to get a bank loan on a house, which you really have no hope of ever paying off, which is okay, since most people figure on moving before then anyway.

Some people are okay with cheap housing, that probably won't hold up to a major storm, and just hope for a few years, or more. Lot of people live in mobile homes, manufactured homes, which are still suppose to hold up to a Cat 3 in Florida anyway, down here in the tropics. No way I'd ride out a tropical storm in one, much less a hurricane.

I'm pretty sure the Bahamas will recover before Puerto Rico recovers from hurricane Maria, two years ago...
08-09-2019 21:16
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(9878)
HarveyH55 wrote:
You do realize that buildings can be built to resist even Cat 5 storms. In Florida, it's been law for quite some time, that new construction be able to hold up to Cat 3 winds. Most of the buildings you see standing in the destruction pictures, are businesses, or homes of wealthy folks from other countries. The working class folks don't have the cash to build like that, or even insurance. Cruise ships like the Bahamas, as it's close enough to Florida for a weekend cruise, which are very popular. The cruise ship lines need a few places for their passengers to play in, while the stop off there. They don't want to spend construction/repair money every storm, or have an interruption in business. Cruises are book months in advance, they are losing money, well not much, just a re-route. But, the more stops they can fit in, breaks up the monotony of being on the ship for long periods, keeps it interesting.

People use to build things to last. My house was built in 1946, and hasn't experience any serious damage. At some point, people got real cheap, guessing that insurance and disaster relief money, made more sense, than build something that would last. Thinking, it's also much easier to get a bank loan on a house, which you really have no hope of ever paying off, which is okay, since most people figure on moving before then anyway.

Some people are okay with cheap housing, that probably won't hold up to a major storm, and just hope for a few years, or more. Lot of people live in mobile homes, manufactured homes, which are still suppose to hold up to a Cat 3 in Florida anyway, down here in the tropics. No way I'd ride out a tropical storm in one, much less a hurricane.

I'm pretty sure the Bahamas will recover before Puerto Rico recovers from hurricane Maria, two years ago...


Yup. Great law that one. Older buildings, were of course, grandfathered in and don't have to be compliant. Eventually, they will disappear (by hurricane?).

I also agree with your assessment of the Bahamas. It'll be like watching the difference between New Orleans and Houston when hit with similar hurricanes.


The Parrot Killer




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