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Argumentum ex fitque



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27-09-2016 02:31
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
I don't get how that relates.
27-09-2016 15:33
IBdaMann
★★★★★
(4267)
jwoodward48 wrote: I don't get how that relates.

It's that the flow in one direction is so many orders of magnitude greater than any flow in the opposite direction.

When you turn on the light switch, electricity flows to get the job done. There are many countless electrons flowing in one direction (at any given point in time) but there are also simultaneously a few that are flowing in the opposite direction. Does it matter? Is the electron flow somehow interrupted by the few electrons moving against the flow? Not at all. It is like a fast moving car being hit head-on with a few grains of sand.


.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-09-2016 15:39
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
But that's not how light works. Light can't collide with light... And besides, you're now arguing that AGW would have minuscule effects if it existed. I'm not quite as well-read on that. But I think that optical depth might play a part?
27-09-2016 15:48
IBdaMann
★★★★★
(4267)
jwoodward48 wrote: But that's not how light works. Light can't collide with light...

Are you sure? What is electromagnetic wave cancellation? Can guitarists use this principle to cancel noise through double pickups?


.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-09-2016 17:30
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
Well, yes, light can interfere with light, and even a single photon can interfere with itself, but that's quite different from the scenarios we're discussing. If incoming light cancelled out outgoing light, that would be WEIRD.
27-09-2016 17:43
IBdaMann
★★★★★
(4267)
jwoodward48 wrote: If incoming light cancelled out outgoing light, that would be WEIRD.

Would it be weird or would it be natural and expected?


.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-09-2016 18:06
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel. That only happens if they're exactly out of phase with each other. And besides, since they're traveling in different directions, they'd just continue on - imagine two waves "colliding" in the ocean. Maybe if I sit my boat in JUST the right spot, I won't feel the waves - but once they're past that point, they'll keep traveling like nothing happened.
27-09-2016 21:26
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8642)
jwoodward48 wrote:
It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel. That only happens if they're exactly out of phase with each other. And besides, since they're traveling in different directions, they'd just continue on - imagine two waves "colliding" in the ocean. Maybe if I sit my boat in JUST the right spot, I won't feel the waves - but once they're past that point, they'll keep traveling like nothing happened.


Flashlights are not a source of single phased light. Flashlights put out a mess.


The Parrot Killer
27-09-2016 21:32
IBdaMann
★★★★★
(4267)
jwoodward48 wrote: It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel.

Correct. If you are talking about visible light it gets difficult. It can still happen but under "weird" conditions as you mentioned.

The guitar example I mentioned is not weird. In fact, it ends up sounding much better.


.


Global Warming: The preferred religion of the scientifically illiterate.

Ceist - I couldn't agree with you more. But when money and religion are involved, and there are people who value them above all else, then the lies begin. - trafn

You are completely misunderstanding their use of the word "accumulation"! - Climate Scientist.

The Stefan-Boltzman equation doesn't come up with the correct temperature if greenhouse gases are not considered - Hank

:*sigh* Not the "raw data" crap. - Leafsdude

IB STILL hasn't explained what Planck's Law means. Just more hand waving that it applies to everything and more asserting that the greenhouse effect 'violates' it.- Ceist
27-09-2016 22:09
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
Into the Night wrote:
jwoodward48 wrote:
It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel. That only happens if they're exactly out of phase with each other. And besides, since they're traveling in different directions, they'd just continue on - imagine two waves "colliding" in the ocean. Maybe if I sit my boat in JUST the right spot, I won't feel the waves - but once they're past that point, they'll keep traveling like nothing happened.


Flashlights are not a source of single phased light. Flashlights put out a mess.


Well, neither are stars.


"Heads on a science
Apart" - Coldplay, The Scientist

IBdaMann wrote:
No, science doesn't insist that, ergo I don't insist that.

I am the Ninja Scientist! Beware!
27-09-2016 22:11
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
IBdaMann wrote:
jwoodward48 wrote: It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel.

Correct. If you are talking about visible light it gets difficult. It can still happen but under "weird" conditions as you mentioned.

The guitar example I mentioned is not weird. In fact, it ends up sounding much better.


.


Yeah, you're right. Thanks. Interference is fun to learn about.

The "weird" would be if any light could "bump into" any other light, which would mean that they were matter, and that would have so many effects.


"Heads on a science
Apart" - Coldplay, The Scientist

IBdaMann wrote:
No, science doesn't insist that, ergo I don't insist that.

I am the Ninja Scientist! Beware!
Edited on 27-09-2016 22:11
27-09-2016 22:34
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8642)
jwoodward48 wrote:
IBdaMann wrote:
jwoodward48 wrote: It's really not expected. If I shine one flashlight into another, the two beams don't cancel.

Correct. If you are talking about visible light it gets difficult. It can still happen but under "weird" conditions as you mentioned.

The guitar example I mentioned is not weird. In fact, it ends up sounding much better.


.


Yeah, you're right. Thanks. Interference is fun to learn about.

The "weird" would be if any light could "bump into" any other light, which would mean that they were matter, and that would have so many effects.


If you take a tank of water, generate waves in it from a single source, and send those waves through two narrow slits, the waves after those slits combine on the other side. In some places they add together, in some places they cancel each other out completely.

The same is true with light.

ALL moving waves generate interference patterns. Nothing weird about it.


The Parrot Killer
27-09-2016 23:40
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
Well, yes, but the energy doesn't just disappear. Right? The waves continue past the site of interference like normal? It's only when they're "on top of each other" that they completely cancel.
28-09-2016 00:32
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8642)
jwoodward48 wrote:
Well, yes, but the energy doesn't just disappear. Right? The waves continue past the site of interference like normal? It's only when they're "on top of each other" that they completely cancel.


No, they disappear and don't come back.

Energy doesn't disappear, but the wave does completely. The energy is simply directed elsewhere.


The Parrot Killer
28-09-2016 00:52
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
Hmm. This is an interesting topic, and one that I'm not particularly knowledgeable about. (Interference specifically, and I still probably know more than the average person on the topic; I speak relative to my individual knowledge, and what I aim for.)
28-09-2016 01:02
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8642)
jwoodward48 wrote:
Hmm. This is an interesting topic, and one that I'm not particularly knowledgeable about. (Interference specifically, and I still probably know more than the average person on the topic; I speak relative to my individual knowledge, and what I aim for.)


Some science museums have a demonstration of this in their displays. Not all of them do of course. It tends to be a bulky display.

However, it's fairly easy to build the apparatus yourself and observe it.


The Parrot Killer
28-09-2016 02:32
jwoodward48
★★★★☆
(1537)
I get the basic interference. I am referring to the energy - where does it go?
28-09-2016 03:13
Into the Night
★★★★★
(8642)
jwoodward48 wrote:
I get the basic interference. I am referring to the energy - where does it go?

It is redirected. Anywhere you see the wave, there is still energy.


The Parrot Killer
Page 3 of 3<123





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