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Ammonium Nitrate explosive??


Ammonium Nitrate explosive??06-08-2020 02:25
sceptic777
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(27)
We have heard, no doubt about the massive explosion in Beirut. The news says, again and again, that a massive store of Ammonium Nitrate was ignited and this caused the explosion. How is this possible? My knowledge of chemistry tells me that an explosion of this type needs 2 or more chemicals that, when combined, and ignited, experience an extremely rapid chemical reaction that produces rapidly expanding gasses, which in turn cause much destruction.

Correct me if I am wrong, but Ammonium Nitrate, by itself cannot ignite or explode. It needs a fuel to be combined with it, so the chemical reaction can take place. That is, a fuel combined with, in this case, an oxygenator. Logically, this would imply that the explosion was not an accident as being reported, but a prepared bomb. Quite a different scenario than reported by our misinfo media!

I have been waiting for them to correct themselves but it has not happened.
THIS IS HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE!
06-08-2020 12:47
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13861)
sceptic777 wrote:
We have heard, no doubt about the massive explosion in Beirut. The news says, again and again, that a massive store of Ammonium Nitrate was ignited and this caused the explosion.

It was the bulk of the destructive explosion, yes.
sceptic777 wrote:
How is this possible? My knowledge of chemistry tells me that an explosion of this type needs 2 or more chemicals that, when combined, and ignited, experience an extremely rapid chemical reaction that produces rapidly expanding gasses, which in turn cause much destruction.

Fuel was available. The grain elevators were nearby, and spilled grain could've easily provided the necessary fuel. Further, the initial explosion was the fireworks storehouse, spewing all kinds of hot metallic material including aluminum dust into the ammonium nitrate. That's a fuel, and a highly reactive one. Further, the ammonium nitrate received a shock detonation (like a blasting cap) from the nearby fireworks storehouse. The secondary blast was the high explosive blast of the ammonium nitrate.
sceptic777 wrote:
Correct me if I am wrong, but Ammonium Nitrate, by itself cannot ignite or explode.
It needs a fuel to be combined with it, so the chemical reaction can take place.

The fuel was available. So was a detonation wave.
sceptic777 wrote:
That is, a fuel combined with, in this case, an oxygenator.

The correct term is oxidizer. Ammonium nitrate is an oxidizer. Quite a powerful one as well. The only oxidizer more powerful is potassium chlorate. Potassium chlorate is also used in fireworks. It is so sensitive that certain mixtures can spontaneously explode, given age or exposure to water (the explosion happened at a harbor).
sceptic777 wrote:
Logically, this would imply that the explosion was not an accident as being reported, but a prepared bomb.

Nope. An accident. A really, really, stupid accident. Storing fireworks near grain elevators, near water, next to big pile of ammonium nitrate. Really, really, stupid.

That kind of shit is highly illegal here in the States. The DOT, the BATF, the FBI, and the State fire marshal would be all over your ass if you tried something like this!

sceptic777 wrote:
Quite a different scenario than reported by our misinfo media!

Nope. It WAS an accident.
sceptic777 wrote:
I have been waiting for them to correct themselves but it has not happened.

No need. It WAS an accident.
sceptic777 wrote:
THIS IS HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE!

High schools don't teach science. They don't teach anything about oxidizers, fuels, explosives, fireworks, or how to make a bomb. They don't even teach physics. Stop using that stupid phrase. Students come out of these 'science' classes without knowing Newton's laws of motion or gravity or how he came to develop them and test them, they know nothing about Kepler or his laws of trajectory. they no nothing about Einstein's theory of relativity or special relativity or even what great equation came out of that and it's meaning. You know, the one so often quoted and so often misunderstood. E-mc^2. They know nothing about quantum physics or how the periodic table was developed. They don't know the characteristics of common materials like water and CO2. They don't understand the laws of thermodynamics or anything about light. They don't even have a clear understanding of how a pulley or lever works. High schools teach religions like the Church of Green and the Church of Global Warming as 'science'.

I am a licensed pyrotechnician and fireworks manufacturer. I know the chemistry of this stuff. I manufacture this stuff.

I do it safely. I store it safely. I shoot it safely. I work with the BATF and the fire marshals in helping to protect the public from the misuse or poor storage of explosives. I don't pull stupid stunts like what was done in Beirut.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit
Edited on 06-08-2020 12:48
16-08-2020 17:24
sceptic777
☆☆☆☆☆
(27)
I have a problem with your reply after I have checked with other people who have knowledge of explosives.
You mentioned the spilled grain as the fuel but would it have to be evenly mixed with the Ammonium Nitrate not just lying adjacent to it? When I have made gun powder the proportions had to be just right and mixed very well or it just fizzled. Secondly, it needs to be detonated, not just lit with a flame. I can't imagine a chemical chain reaction happening that way!
18-08-2020 21:57
Into the NightProfile picture★★★★★
(13861)
sceptic777 wrote:
I have a problem with your reply after I have checked with other people who have knowledge of explosives.

Since you don't mention who these 'other people' are, I will assume it is just you.
sceptic777 wrote:
You mentioned the spilled grain as the fuel but would it have to be evenly mixed with the Ammonium Nitrate not just lying adjacent to it?

No. Further, the primary source of fuel was the fireworks themselves.
sceptic777 wrote:
When I have made gun powder the proportions had to be just right and mixed very well or it just fizzled.

It will still just fizzle, even with the right proportions. Black powder (I assume that's what you mean by 'gun powder', since guns generally use nitrocellulose these days instead of black powder), is not anything like ammonium nitrate. It is not a high explosive. It is a deflagerant and low explosive. It is mixed in varying proportions of KO3, charcoal, and sulfur, depending on the purpose. It produces a large amount of particulates when burned, and can burn in anything from hours/gm to milliseconds per gram. It's burn rate is also heavily influenced by the shape of it's burning container.

KN03 (potassium nitrate, or saltpeter) is relatively a very safe oxidizer. It is not particularly shock sensitive, friction sensitive, nor static electricity sensitive. It burns slowly with a purple flame.

Ammonium nitrate by itself is shock sensitive, but not particular friction sensitive nor static electricity sensitive. It is also somewhat hygroscopic, making it pretty useless for use as an oxidizer in fireworks. It will burn, but not detonate from fire. When subjected to sufficient shock, it will detonate as a high explosive, particularly in the presence of a fuel (but not required...fuel only makes it easier).
sceptic777 wrote:
Secondly, it needs to be detonated, not just lit with a flame.

It was detonated.
sceptic777 wrote:
I can't imagine a chemical chain reaction happening that way!

Because you don't understand the chemistry of explosives or oxidizers.


The Parrot Killer

Debunked in my sig. - tmiddles

Google keeps track of paranoid talk and i'm not on their list. I've been evaluated and certified. - keepit




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