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Headed For A New Ice Age? Latest Data Says Yes!


Headed For A New Ice Age? Latest Data Says Yes!21-04-2018 19:05
loudelmonte
☆☆☆☆☆
(1)
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA
21-04-2018 20:26
James___
★★★☆☆
(739)
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water
21-04-2018 21:53
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 21-04-2018 21:54
01-05-2018 18:50
The Night is Young
☆☆☆☆☆
(1)
I totally agree!
03-05-2018 23:53
Wake
★★★★★
(3417)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.
04-05-2018 00:50
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


It IS rather amusing.


The Parrot Killer
04-05-2018 20:14
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1251)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.
04-05-2018 20:24
James___
★★★☆☆
(739)
Tim the plumber wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.



Tim,
The U.S. east of the Mississippi is running out of fresh water. The Ogallala Aquifer should be dry within about 40 years. That represents about 15% of the US agricultural production. If the NAPA Valley goes dry which it is doing that is another 25% of the US agricultural production.
..But that's not a problem, right ? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/08/vanishing-aquifer-interactive-map/


..Just for laughs, the Ogallala Aquifer and other sources of fresh water is what the BBC was talking about. Maybe someone should've read the BBC article instead of just laughing at it ?
Edited on 04-05-2018 20:27
04-05-2018 20:44
Wake
★★★★★
(3417)
James___ wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.



Tim,
The U.S. east of the Mississippi is running out of fresh water. The Ogallala Aquifer should be dry within about 40 years. That represents about 15% of the US agricultural production. If the NAPA Valley goes dry which it is doing that is another 25% of the US agricultural production.
..But that's not a problem, right ? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/08/vanishing-aquifer-interactive-map/


..Just for laughs, the Ogallala Aquifer and other sources of fresh water is what the BBC was talking about. Maybe someone should've read the BBC article instead of just laughing at it ?


Leave it to you to believe anything from National Geographic. They also strongly believe in global warming and extreme sea level rise.
04-05-2018 22:00
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
James___ wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.



Tim,
The U.S. east of the Mississippi is running out of fresh water. The Ogallala Aquifer should be dry within about 40 years. That represents about 15% of the US agricultural production. If the NAPA Valley goes dry which it is doing that is another 25% of the US agricultural production.
..But that's not a problem, right ? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/08/vanishing-aquifer-interactive-map/


..Just for laughs, the Ogallala Aquifer and other sources of fresh water is what the BBC was talking about. Maybe someone should've read the BBC article instead of just laughing at it ?


The Ogalla Aquifer is not going to go dry. Overuse has reduced its levels in some places. In others, the Aquifer is seeing rising water levels.

This Aquifer is recharged from various sources at a slow rate. Overuse is the problem, not the weather or 'climate change'.

Get yer facts right. Instead of using a news magazine as the source of your information, you might try the water table monitoring stations throughout the plains and in northern Texas. The University of Oklahoma is working on ways to better track and improve the recharge rate of the Aquifer.

The NAPA valley is not going to go dry. They actually got EXTRA water last year, resulting in a spurt in grass growth (which fueled the fires later on). This year they AGAIN got extra water in the Spring season. Poor power line maintenance caused the ignition source and the high Santa Ana winds did the rest.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 04-05-2018 22:03
04-05-2018 22:25
Wake
★★★★★
(3417)
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.



Tim,
The U.S. east of the Mississippi is running out of fresh water. The Ogallala Aquifer should be dry within about 40 years. That represents about 15% of the US agricultural production. If the NAPA Valley goes dry which it is doing that is another 25% of the US agricultural production.
..But that's not a problem, right ? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/08/vanishing-aquifer-interactive-map/


..Just for laughs, the Ogallala Aquifer and other sources of fresh water is what the BBC was talking about. Maybe someone should've read the BBC article instead of just laughing at it ?


The Ogalla Aquifer is not going to go dry. Overuse has reduced its levels in some places. In others, the Aquifer is seeing rising water levels.

This Aquifer is recharged from various sources at a slow rate. Overuse is the problem, not the weather or 'climate change'.

Get yer facts right. Instead of using a news magazine as the source of your information, you might try the water table monitoring stations throughout the plains and in northern Texas. The University of Oklahoma is working on ways to better track and improve the recharge rate of the Aquifer.

The NAPA valley is not going to go dry. They actually got EXTRA water last year, resulting in a spurt in grass growth (which fueled the fires later on). This year they AGAIN got extra water in the Spring season. Poor power line maintenance caused the ignition source and the high Santa Ana winds did the rest.


PG&E is very good at power line maintenance. The problems came from a firebug and high winds and not PG&E. As these fires started you can see that they started progressively in a line directly along a road and each new fire up-wind. How they ever charged PG&E is absolutely crazy.

Now one thing they could do would be to put the power lines underground but since California is a state of very old cities the expense to do this would be crippling. So we're pretty much stuck with telephone pole power lines and these in turn are very sensitive to fires.

If you go down to Phoenix there are many suburbs that have all of the phone and power lines underground. But the transformers still have to be above ground and so are possible sources of ignition. While I was just down there we had a power outage that lasted several hours since it is difficult to troubleshot underground lines.
04-05-2018 23:27
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
Tim the plumber wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
James___ wrote:
loudelmonte wrote:
This video discusses the convergence of global warming, a lull in solar activity, and the weakening of the Atlantic current. Based on the latest data, it suggests that the convergence of the three may result in a mini ice age. https://youtu.be/xYsQ6vy1WkA


..If we go by historical records (ice cores), 80,000 years ? At the moment we do not know why ice ages are cyclical. Before 1 million years ago they happened once every 40,000 years. Today it's about once every 100,000 years. What changed besides a decrease in CO2 ? CO2 levels dropped by about 10% between 800,000 to 1 million years ago. Why would this even make a difference when man has no ability to change this planet?
.A European news story. http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water


Ice cores do not tell you the temperature of the Earth. If anything, all it tells you is the temperature at the site of the ice core.

The world is not running out of fresh water. It still rains. It still snows. This BBC tripe is just another bit of propaganda using fake data to describe a 'crisis'.

Mismanagement of fresh water resources is quite another thing.


Can you imagine a program on the BBC talking about a water crisis? Most of Britain has two dry months out of the year. It's like Seattle in waders.


We don't get 2 dry months a decade.



Tim,
The U.S. east of the Mississippi is running out of fresh water. The Ogallala Aquifer should be dry within about 40 years. That represents about 15% of the US agricultural production. If the NAPA Valley goes dry which it is doing that is another 25% of the US agricultural production.
..But that's not a problem, right ? https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/08/vanishing-aquifer-interactive-map/


..Just for laughs, the Ogallala Aquifer and other sources of fresh water is what the BBC was talking about. Maybe someone should've read the BBC article instead of just laughing at it ?


The Ogalla Aquifer is not going to go dry. Overuse has reduced its levels in some places. In others, the Aquifer is seeing rising water levels.

This Aquifer is recharged from various sources at a slow rate. Overuse is the problem, not the weather or 'climate change'.

Get yer facts right. Instead of using a news magazine as the source of your information, you might try the water table monitoring stations throughout the plains and in northern Texas. The University of Oklahoma is working on ways to better track and improve the recharge rate of the Aquifer.

The NAPA valley is not going to go dry. They actually got EXTRA water last year, resulting in a spurt in grass growth (which fueled the fires later on). This year they AGAIN got extra water in the Spring season. Poor power line maintenance caused the ignition source and the high Santa Ana winds did the rest.


PG&E is very good at power line maintenance.

They actually have a record of poor maintenance.
Wake wrote:
The problems came from a firebug

That does seem to be more of a problem nowadays as well.
Wake wrote:
and high winds

The biggest contributing factor.
Wake wrote:
and not PG&E.

Nope. It was PG&E that started many of the fires. The high winds down the poorly maintained lines.
Wake wrote:
As these fires started you can see that they started progressively in a line directly along a road and each new fire up-wind. How they ever charged PG&E is absolutely crazy.

Not crazy at all. They didn't maintain their lines.
Wake wrote:
Now one thing they could do would be to put the power lines underground but since California is a state of very old cities the expense to do this would be crippling.

Both San Francisco and Los Angeles uses underground power lines. So does Oakland.
Wake wrote:
So we're pretty much stuck with telephone pole power lines and these in turn are very sensitive to fires.

It was primarily the high tension lines that failed.
Wake wrote:
If you go down to Phoenix there are many suburbs that have all of the phone and power lines underground.

True.
Wake wrote:
But the transformers still have to be above ground

Wrong. Transformers are mounted underground, for example, in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Wake wrote:
and so are possible sources of ignition.

They certainly can be, but they weren't in the Napa valley fires.
Wake wrote:
While I was just down there we had a power outage that lasted several hours since it is difficult to troubleshot underground lines.

It is not difficult at all. It is routine.


The Parrot Killer
04-05-2018 23:49
James___
★★★☆☆
(739)
Into the Night wrote:

The Ogalla Aquifer is not going to go dry. Overuse has reduced its levels in some places. In others, the Aquifer is seeing rising water levels.

This Aquifer is recharged from various sources at a slow rate. Overuse is the problem, not the weather or 'climate change'.

Get yer facts right.



ITN,
..Since you are correcting me, please show where I said climate change was the cause. Failure to show where I made such a claim merely demonstrates that you are a know nothing troll.
..My link stated that 30% of all water in the U.S. pumped from aquifers for irrigation happens in the Ogallala Aquifer. Does that mean weather or climate change to you ? It does, you just posted that's what the link I referenced says.
It also shows most of where levels are rising is in Nebraska and lowering about everywhere else. So when you repeat what my link shows, you say it's not something that I know because I am wrong.
.. It doesn't matter what I say, you'll disagree with me because that's how you win a debate. That's all it's about, right ? Right !
..It's sad itn, you'll openly lie to say I am wrong.
BTW idiot, Iowa is right next door to Nebraska. It's on bedrock and has plenty of water. maybe they should find out if that's what's refilling the Ogallala Aquifer under Nebraska ? But we have to assume it's not since it's not a question that you asked. Just about everything in your post was a lie. Next you're going to say your wife is Jewish. Oops, sorry, you already went there. And all for the love of Wake.
..That's funny. You'll lie for wake.
05-05-2018 00:42
Wake
★★★★★
(3417)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
PG&E is very good at power line maintenance.

They actually have a record of poor maintenance.
Wake wrote:
The problems came from a firebug

That does seem to be more of a problem nowadays as well.
Wake wrote:
and high winds

The biggest contributing factor.
Wake wrote:
and not PG&E.

Nope. It was PG&E that started many of the fires. The high winds down the poorly maintained lines.
Wake wrote:
As these fires started you can see that they started progressively in a line directly along a road and each new fire up-wind. How they ever charged PG&E is absolutely crazy.

Not crazy at all. They didn't maintain their lines.
Wake wrote:
Now one thing they could do would be to put the power lines underground but since California is a state of very old cities the expense to do this would be crippling.

Both San Francisco and Los Angeles uses underground power lines. So does Oakland.
Wake wrote:
So we're pretty much stuck with telephone pole power lines and these in turn are very sensitive to fires.

It was primarily the high tension lines that failed.
Wake wrote:
If you go down to Phoenix there are many suburbs that have all of the phone and power lines underground.

True.
Wake wrote:
But the transformers still have to be above ground

Wrong. Transformers are mounted underground, for example, in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Wake wrote:
and so are possible sources of ignition.

They certainly can be, but they weren't in the Napa valley fires.
Wake wrote:
While I was just down there we had a power outage that lasted several hours since it is difficult to troubleshot underground lines.

It is not difficult at all. It is routine.


You seem to be forgetting that I live in the Bay Area. I haven't been to Los Angeles in a long time but in the bay area underground utility lines are VERY scarce and usually only in rich neighborhoods.

PG&E has very good maintenance. The "fires" they supposedly triggered were all in one area. The high winds were over the entire Napa and Sonoma valleys. As I noted the fires started separately and moved upwind at substantial distances from each other. This is not what occurs in power line fires. In several other cases the transformers had holes shot in them with high powered rifles. This drained the oil coolant from them and allowed them to overheat and start fires.

There are places in San Francisco where they can mount the transformers underground because there are underground tunnels for the San Francisco transit authority. But BART and home utilities are all mounted above ground so that maintenance can be performed. And there are circuit breakers mounted on them that must be readily available and not underground where transformer explosions can cause massive damage.

I wonder where you come up with these things. I designed the PG&E remote reading system and am presently being considered for a large upgrade.

Even in Seattle they run overhead power lines unless citizen committees from neighborhoods specifically request underground facilities and then they are required to pay for them. Or perhaps you think that Seattle Light is rich?
05-05-2018 03:20
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
James___ wrote:
Into the Night wrote:

The Ogalla Aquifer is not going to go dry. Overuse has reduced its levels in some places. In others, the Aquifer is seeing rising water levels.

This Aquifer is recharged from various sources at a slow rate. Overuse is the problem, not the weather or 'climate change'.

Get yer facts right.



ITN,
..Since you are correcting me, please show where I said climate change was the cause.

Your reference to the UK article.
James___ wrote:
Failure to show where I made such a claim merely demonstrates that you are a know nothing troll.

Buzzword fallacy.
James___ wrote:
..My link stated that 30% of all water in the U.S. pumped from aquifers for irrigation happens in the Ogallala Aquifer. Does that mean weather or climate change to you ? It does, you just posted that's what the link I referenced says.

That is what it says.
James___ wrote:
It also shows most of where levels are rising is in Nebraska and lowering about everywhere else. So when you repeat what my link shows, you say it's not something that I know because I am wrong.

Some parts are rising, some are falling.
James___ wrote:
.. It doesn't matter what I say, you'll disagree with me because that's how you win a debate. That's all it's about, right ? Right !

You seem to think it is for some reason.
James___ wrote:
..It's sad itn, you'll openly lie to say I am wrong.

Mantra 5.
James___ wrote:
BTW idiot, Iowa is right next door to Nebraska.

So?
James___ wrote:
It's on bedrock and has plenty of water.

So? They happen to have more lakes than Nebraska.
James___ wrote:
maybe they should find out if that's what's refilling the Ogallala Aquifer under Nebraska ?

They already know. The upper playa lake and the runoff from the east side of the Rockies.
James___ wrote:
But we have to assume it's not since it's not a question that you asked. Just about everything in your post was a lie.

Mantra 5.
James___ wrote:
Next you're going to say your wife is Jewish. Oops, sorry, you already went there.

She is Jewish. For some reason you refuse to believe that.
James___ wrote:
And all for the love of Wake.

Wake doesn't matter on that point.
James___ wrote:
..That's funny. You'll lie for wake.

Mantra 5.


The Parrot Killer
05-05-2018 03:44
Into the Night
★★★★★
(5881)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
PG&E is very good at power line maintenance.

They actually have a record of poor maintenance.
Wake wrote:
The problems came from a firebug

That does seem to be more of a problem nowadays as well.
Wake wrote:
and high winds

The biggest contributing factor.
Wake wrote:
and not PG&E.

Nope. It was PG&E that started many of the fires. The high winds down the poorly maintained lines.
Wake wrote:
As these fires started you can see that they started progressively in a line directly along a road and each new fire up-wind. How they ever charged PG&E is absolutely crazy.

Not crazy at all. They didn't maintain their lines.
Wake wrote:
Now one thing they could do would be to put the power lines underground but since California is a state of very old cities the expense to do this would be crippling.

Both San Francisco and Los Angeles uses underground power lines. So does Oakland.
Wake wrote:
So we're pretty much stuck with telephone pole power lines and these in turn are very sensitive to fires.

It was primarily the high tension lines that failed.
Wake wrote:
If you go down to Phoenix there are many suburbs that have all of the phone and power lines underground.

True.
Wake wrote:
But the transformers still have to be above ground

Wrong. Transformers are mounted underground, for example, in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Wake wrote:
and so are possible sources of ignition.

They certainly can be, but they weren't in the Napa valley fires.
Wake wrote:
While I was just down there we had a power outage that lasted several hours since it is difficult to troubleshot underground lines.

It is not difficult at all. It is routine.


You seem to be forgetting that I live in the Bay Area.

Not at all. You just seem to be unaware of a lot of things in the place you live.
Wake wrote:
I haven't been to Los Angeles in a long time but in the bay area underground utility lines are VERY scarce and usually only in rich neighborhoods.

WRONG. Downtown transformers and power lines are underground.
Wake wrote:
PG&E has very good maintenance.

Not really. They have a long history of stupid failures due to poor maintenance.
Wake wrote:
The "fires" they supposedly triggered were all in one area.

Like the Napa valley.
Wake wrote:
The high winds were over the entire Napa and Sonoma valleys.

True. They were all over Northern California (and later include Southern California) at the time.
Wake wrote:
As I noted the fires started separately and moved upwind at substantial distances from each other.

They did start in a variety of places.
Wake wrote:
This is not what occurs in power line fires.

Yes it is.
Wake wrote:
In several other cases the transformers had holes shot in them with high powered rifles.

Which probably didn't help. Why idiots in your State take potshots at things like transformers and passing aircraft is beyond me. It's a regular problem in California.
Wake wrote:
This drained the oil coolant from them and allowed them to overheat and start fires.

I have heard of no such reports. The fires were started by downed power lines.
Wake wrote:
There are places in San Francisco where they can mount the transformers underground because there are underground tunnels for the San Francisco transit authority.

Those transformers are for more than the transit authority!
Wake wrote:
But BART and home utilities are all mounted above ground so that maintenance can be performed.

BART has transformers mounted both above and below ground. It also has power lines mounted above and below ground. Maintenance in BART is easy. Just map out the block and ride a service car there.
Wake wrote:
And there are circuit breakers mounted on them that must be readily available and not underground

The circuit breakers are underground too. They are readily available.
Wake wrote:
where transformer explosions can cause massive damage.

That trips the previous breaker, doesn't it?
Wake wrote:
I wonder where you come up with these things.

Simple. It's easy to see in any city, including San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Wake wrote:
I designed the PG&E remote reading system and am presently being considered for a large upgrade.

Bull.
Wake wrote:
Even in Seattle they run overhead power lines unless citizen committees from neighborhoods specifically request underground facilities and then they are required to pay for them.

Nope. Downtown Seattle and downtown Bellevue both run underground power lines, transformers, and breakers.
Wake wrote:
Or perhaps you think that Seattle Light is rich?

It happens to be.


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