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Free Energy!


Free Energy!02-02-2019 22:30
HarveyH55
★★☆☆☆
(288)
Had a vision the other day at work for a free energy device. It's not going to power a town, or even a household, but I believe it's a cheap way to harvest some free energy, shouldn't be very expensive to set up either.

Basically, we use water in our homes frequently, and flowing water can be used to generate electricity. I was figuring that a small generator could be placed inline with a home's main infeed line from the meter, so any water used, any where in the home, would spin the generator. It would have to be small, as not to reduce water pressure to much, but should be sufficient to keep a small battery bank charged, for cell phones, led emergency lighting around the home, maybe a rechargeable flashlight.

Not everybody experiences power outages, or even for extend periods, but getting your water cut off, almost never happens. But for some people, power can be out for days or weeks, and even just a little power is useful to help get through those times.
03-02-2019 02:10
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Had a vision the other day at work for a free energy device. It's not going to power a town, or even a household, but I believe it's a cheap way to harvest some free energy, shouldn't be very expensive to set up either.

Basically, we use water in our homes frequently, and flowing water can be used to generate electricity. I was figuring that a small generator could be placed inline with a home's main infeed line from the meter, so any water used, any where in the home, would spin the generator. It would have to be small, as not to reduce water pressure to much, but should be sufficient to keep a small battery bank charged, for cell phones, led emergency lighting around the home, maybe a rechargeable flashlight.

Not everybody experiences power outages, or even for extend periods, but getting your water cut off, almost never happens. But for some people, power can be out for days or weeks, and even just a little power is useful to help get through those times.
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.

This would give us about 25 gallons per hour to be very generous or about three gallons per minute. Water weighs about 8 1/3rd lbs per gallon and let us assume that the water pressure is high enough that you could withdraw power from the water flow without disrupting the normal uses by drawing off power.

Just as a rough approximation you would be able to generate about perhaps 1 watt in an entire day's use. The general household uses large amounts of power usually only for heating in the winter.
03-02-2019 22:35
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Had a vision the other day at work for a free energy device. It's not going to power a town, or even a household, but I believe it's a cheap way to harvest some free energy, shouldn't be very expensive to set up either.

Basically, we use water in our homes frequently, and flowing water can be used to generate electricity. I was figuring that a small generator could be placed inline with a home's main infeed line from the meter, so any water used, any where in the home, would spin the generator. It would have to be small, as not to reduce water pressure to much, but should be sufficient to keep a small battery bank charged, for cell phones, led emergency lighting around the home, maybe a rechargeable flashlight.

Not everybody experiences power outages, or even for extend periods, but getting your water cut off, almost never happens. But for some people, power can be out for days or weeks, and even just a little power is useful to help get through those times.


Why not just get gas? Those lines are buried too, and they produce a lot more power without blocking your water line.

Don't have gas? Just buy a backyard propane tank and fill it once in awhile. Then when power goes out, you have fuel to do whatever you want.

Or, how about this? Get a home generator! Don't need that much? Buy a battery and an inverter. You could also hook up a bicycle to a small generator and have your kid or your wife get exercise while charging a phone.

What I usually do in such situations is just charge the thing in the car while I drive.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 03-02-2019 22:50
03-02-2019 22:48
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
Had a vision the other day at work for a free energy device. It's not going to power a town, or even a household, but I believe it's a cheap way to harvest some free energy, shouldn't be very expensive to set up either.

Basically, we use water in our homes frequently, and flowing water can be used to generate electricity. I was figuring that a small generator could be placed inline with a home's main infeed line from the meter, so any water used, any where in the home, would spin the generator. It would have to be small, as not to reduce water pressure to much, but should be sufficient to keep a small battery bank charged, for cell phones, led emergency lighting around the home, maybe a rechargeable flashlight.

Not everybody experiences power outages, or even for extend periods, but getting your water cut off, almost never happens. But for some people, power can be out for days or weeks, and even just a little power is useful to help get through those times.
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day.

There are more than 10 days in a month, Wake.
Wake wrote:
This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.
[quote]Wake wrote:
This would give us about 25 gallons per hour to be very generous

There aren't 12 hours in a day, Wake. There are 24. Oh, wait, you still think there are 10 days in a month!
Wake wrote:
or about three gallons per minute.

There are more than 20 minutes in an hour, Wake! Oh, wait, you still think there are 10 days in a month and 12 hours in a day!
Wake wrote:
Water weighs about 8 1/3rd lbs per gallon and let us assume that the water pressure is high enough that you could withdraw power from the water flow without disrupting the normal uses by drawing off power.

Finally, a number that is actually accurate. Water indeed does weight 8.32 lbs per gallon.
Wake wrote:
Just as a rough approximation you would be able to generate about perhaps 1 watt in an entire day's use.

A number made up out of thick air, Wake.
Wake wrote:
The general household uses large amounts of power usually only for heating in the winter.

Do you know what 'air conditioning' is? What is a 'general household'? What is 'large amounts of power'? Do they have an electric welder? Perhaps a home machine shop? Maybe a home electric kiln? How much do they cook?

In other words, you have no idea what you're talking about again, Wake.


The Parrot Killer
03-02-2019 22:52
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
[quote]HarveyH55 wrote:
Had a vision the other day at work for a free energy device. It's not going to power a town, or even a household, but I believe it's a cheap way to harvest some free energy, shouldn't be very expensive to set up either.

Basically, we use water in our homes frequently, and flowing water can be used to generate electricity. I was figuring that a small generator could be placed inline with a home's main infeed line from the meter, so any water used, any where in the home, would spin the generator. It would have to be small, as not to reduce water pressure to much, but should be sufficient to keep a small battery bank charged, for cell phones, led emergency lighting around the home, maybe a rechargeable flashlight.

Not everybody experiences power outages, or even for extend periods, but getting your water cut off, almost never happens. But for some people, power can be out for days or weeks, and even just a little power is useful to help get through those times.
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day.

There are more than 10 days in a month, Wake.
Wake wrote:
This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.
Wake wrote:
This would give us about 25 gallons per hour to be very generous

There aren't 12 hours in a day, Wake. There are 24. Oh, wait, you still think there are 10 days in a month!
Wake wrote:
or about three gallons per minute.

There are more than 20 minutes in an hour, Wake! Oh, wait, you still think there are 10 days in a month and 12 hours in a day!
Wake wrote:
Water weighs about 8 1/3rd lbs per gallon and let us assume that the water pressure is high enough that you could withdraw power from the water flow without disrupting the normal uses by drawing off power.

Finally, a number that is actually accurate. Water indeed does weight 8.32 lbs per gallon.
Wake wrote:
Just as a rough approximation you would be able to generate about perhaps 1 watt in an entire day's use.

A number made up out of thick air, Wake.
Wake wrote:
The general household uses large amounts of power usually only for heating in the winter.

Do you know what 'air conditioning' is? What is a 'general household'? What is 'large amounts of power'? Do they have an electric welder? Perhaps a home machine shop? Maybe a home electric kiln? How much do they cook?

In other words, you have no idea what you're talking about again, Wake.


In other words, you're saying that there is a lot of power there. Since you have a better idea than I do let's see your calculations.
Edited on 03-02-2019 23:04
03-02-2019 22:55
HarveyH55
★★☆☆☆
(288)
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.
03-02-2019 23:03
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.


My calculation were written wrong because I was touch typing while using a calculator that covered most of the screen. I think that you will find that the 1 watt level was correct.

The long and the short of it is that the drainage though the batteries would be much more than the power obtained from your idea of using a turbine in the water flow - I didn't even take into count the loss of the efficiency of the turbine which would knock 70% of that off at those levels.
03-02-2019 23:29
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.


Pathway lighting can be solar powered. They work pretty good these days. You can get them from most home center stores or even Walmart. Some are better than others though.

Charging a phone can be done with a battery. Use a car battery and an inverter. You can charge the car battery from your power when it's on, or even from your car.

If you have to evacuate, you have your car with you. That's a source of power. If you use a bike to evacuate, you have YOU with you. That's also a source of power. Get a generator for your bike.

Best way to deal with a hurricane coming is to be prepared beforehand. Filling bottles with water from your tap works well. You don't have to buy it. Make sure you have a supply of gasoline, propane, or some other fuel BEFORE reports of an approaching hurricane arrive. Then you can avoid the panic in the stores.


The Parrot Killer
03-02-2019 23:35
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.


My calculation were written wrong because I was touch typing while using a calculator that covered most of the screen. I think that you will find that the 1 watt level was correct.

What calculations? Oh, the ones where you think there are 10 days in a month and only 12 hours in a day and only 20 minutes in an hour?

Are you really THAT bad with a calculator, Wake? Do you actually NEED a calculator for that, Wake?

Where does the '1 watt' come from? That's a number that you just made up, and has nothing to do with your 'calculations'.
Wake wrote:
The long and the short of it is that the drainage though the batteries would be much more than the power obtained from your idea of using a turbine in the water flow - I didn't even take into count the loss of the efficiency of the turbine which would knock 70% of that off at those levels.

More made up numbers, Wake. You don't know the current draw, the size of the battery, the size of the turbine or the generator it's connected to, the size of the pipe, the allowable pressure drop, or any of the usual kinds of numbers to even BEGIN a calculation of that sort.


The Parrot Killer
03-02-2019 23:40
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.

My calculation were written wrong because I was touch typing while using a calculator that covered most of the screen. I think that you will find that the 1 watt level was correct.

What calculations? Oh, the ones where you think there are 10 days in a month and only 12 hours in a day and only 20 minutes in an hour?

Are you really THAT bad with a calculator, Wake? Do you actually NEED a calculator for that, Wake?

Where does the '1 watt' come from? That's a number that you just made up, and has nothing to do with your 'calculations'.
Wake wrote:
The long and the short of it is that the drainage though the batteries would be much more than the power obtained from your idea of using a turbine in the water flow - I didn't even take into count the loss of the efficiency of the turbine which would knock 70% of that off at those levels.

More made up numbers, Wake. You don't know the current draw, the size of the battery, the size of the turbine or the generator it's connected to, the size of the pipe, the allowable pressure drop, or any of the usual kinds of numbers to even BEGIN a calculation of that sort.

I'm waiting for you to show my starting and ending figures to be incorrect. Let's see your calculation when you've already told us what a math wiz you are.

I'll even give you a head start: Pwhp = q h SG / (3960 μ)
Edited on 03-02-2019 23:42
04-02-2019 00:10
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
HarveyH55 wrote:
I was thinking, on a much smaller scale, and no maintenance, emergency power for charging a phone, and running some simple, low-power lighting for pathway/utility areas. All your suggestions require fuel and regular maintenance. We usually get plenty of warning before a hurricane, the main cause of power outages here. The news media, usually over-hype the severity, and push being prepared. This usually means buying gas, batteries, bottled water... Well, people get all worked up, and clean out stores. Never seen a gas shortage, but the lines get long. It's good for the economy, better than holiday sales. Always thought it insane, since if you have to evacuate, you can't take a lot of stuff with you. Even if you are in the direct path, not likely to be without power for long if you live in town, maybe a week in most places.

My calculation were written wrong because I was touch typing while using a calculator that covered most of the screen. I think that you will find that the 1 watt level was correct.

What calculations? Oh, the ones where you think there are 10 days in a month and only 12 hours in a day and only 20 minutes in an hour?

Are you really THAT bad with a calculator, Wake? Do you actually NEED a calculator for that, Wake?

Where does the '1 watt' come from? That's a number that you just made up, and has nothing to do with your 'calculations'.
Wake wrote:
The long and the short of it is that the drainage though the batteries would be much more than the power obtained from your idea of using a turbine in the water flow - I didn't even take into count the loss of the efficiency of the turbine which would knock 70% of that off at those levels.

More made up numbers, Wake. You don't know the current draw, the size of the battery, the size of the turbine or the generator it's connected to, the size of the pipe, the allowable pressure drop, or any of the usual kinds of numbers to even BEGIN a calculation of that sort.

I'm waiting for you to show my starting and ending figures to be incorrect. Let's see your calculation when you've already told us what a math wiz you are.

I'll even give you a head start: Pwhp = q h SG / (3960 μ)


I already did, Wake. Pay attention.


The Parrot Killer
04-02-2019 00:27
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:I'll even give you a head start: Pwhp = q h SG / (3960 μ)


I already did, Wake. Pay attention.


I knew that you are all mouth and no ability. The load in the pipes means NOTHING. The water pressure was assumed to be high enough that putting a turbine in the line would not effect the flow rate.

But you have a violent inability to either read or understand the problem. You also seemed to have missed the fact that I said that I wasn't counting losses in the turbine and that the TODAL daily amount of power was the only thing being calculated.

So tell us stupid - calculate it and show your calculations.
Edited on 04-02-2019 00:31
04-02-2019 20:59
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:I'll even give you a head start: Pwhp = q h SG / (3960 μ)


I already did, Wake. Pay attention.


I knew that you are all mouth and no ability.

Starting with your usual insults.
Wake wrote:
The load in the pipes means NOTHING.

Pipes don't have a 'load,' Wake.
Wake wrote:
The water pressure was assumed to be high enough that putting a turbine in the line would not effect the flow rate.

Okay. You just assume that. Big deal.
Wake wrote:
But you have a violent inability to either read or understand the problem.

No, YOU are just making up numbers.
Wake wrote:
You also seemed to have missed the fact that I said that I wasn't counting losses in the turbine and that the TODAL daily amount of power was the only thing being calculated.

No, you were making up numbers.
Wake wrote:
So tell us stupid - calculate it and show your calculations.

I'm not trying to calculate his power. YOU are. There are too many values not defined.


The Parrot Killer
04-02-2019 21:26
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:I'll even give you a head start: Pwhp = q h SG / (3960 μ)


I already did, Wake. Pay attention.


I knew that you are all mouth and no ability.

Starting with your usual insults.
Wake wrote:
The load in the pipes means NOTHING.

Pipes don't have a 'load,' Wake.
Wake wrote:
The water pressure was assumed to be high enough that putting a turbine in the line would not effect the flow rate.

Okay. You just assume that. Big deal.
Wake wrote:
But you have a violent inability to either read or understand the problem.

No, YOU are just making up numbers.
Wake wrote:
You also seemed to have missed the fact that I said that I wasn't counting losses in the turbine and that the TODAL daily amount of power was the only thing being calculated.

No, you were making up numbers.
Wake wrote:
So tell us stupid - calculate it and show your calculations.

I'm not trying to calculate his power. YOU are. There are too many values not defined.

And yet another demonstration that you can't even envision what he is talking about. Size of the turbine? What is that supposed to mean?The AVERAGE WATER USE OF THE AVERAGE house is readily available and my water bill shows me to be slightly on the low side of average and shows the monthly water usage. Apparently this is so far over your head that the only response you have is to fiddle around and say that it isn't possible to do.
04-02-2019 23:27
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
And yet another demonstration that you can't even envision what he is talking about.
I completely understand what he is talking about, Wake.
Wake wrote:
Size of the turbine? What is that supposed to mean?

Size. Turbine. Which word are you having a problem with? I'm not even mentioning the size of any turbine. YOU are.
Wake wrote:
The AVERAGE WATER USE OF THE AVERAGE house is readily available and my water bill shows me to be slightly on the low side of average
YOU said you use 300 gallons a day, Wake. No wonder California is having a water shortage!
Wake wrote:
Apparently this is so far over your head that the only response you have is to fiddle around and say that it isn't possible to do.
It is possible to do, Wake. I've never said otherwise. It's impractical. There are better ways to charge phones and provide a bit of light during power outages. Charging the phone might be academic anyway since the cell towers near you may also not have power.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 04-02-2019 23:28
04-02-2019 23:37
gfm7175
★☆☆☆☆
(105)
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)
05-02-2019 00:00
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


You just said that you do mathematics in your work. Using a base of 3,000 gallons per month and assuming that the water pressure is sufficient that drawing power off of it doesn't diminish the flow that you are using and that the turbine or whatever method you are using is 100% efficient then by all means tell us what is the power that you could withdraw at that flow rate per day.

Do not pull a Nightmare and attempt to change the question to one of typos.
05-02-2019 00:14
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


The Parrot Killer
05-02-2019 00:21
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


You just said that you do mathematics in your work. Using a base of 3,000 gallons per month and assuming that the water pressure is sufficient that drawing power off of it doesn't diminish the flow that you are using and that the turbine or whatever method you are using is 100% efficient then by all means tell us what is the power that you could withdraw at that flow rate per day.

Do not pull a Nightmare and attempt to change the question to one of typos.


No machine is 100% efficient, Wake. There is no such thing a perpetual motion machine, Wake.

There is no magick cutoff for 'sufficient pressure'. If there is a pressure difference at all, the turbine will turn (assuming there is enough pressure to overcome friction and other loads).

Any household plumbing has sufficient pressure difference across a turbine, Wake (assuming the main valve is open!).

You keep going for these magick cutoff points, Wake. What is it with you and magick cutoff points?

You weren't making typos with your 'math'. It was just wrong, Wake, even though you claimed it was right, and insult people for trying to correct you.


The Parrot Killer
Edited on 05-02-2019 00:23
05-02-2019 00:24
gfm7175
★☆☆☆☆
(105)
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...
05-02-2019 00:25
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
Into the Night wrote:
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


You just said that you do mathematics in your work. Using a base of 3,000 gallons per month and assuming that the water pressure is sufficient that drawing power off of it doesn't diminish the flow that you are using and that the turbine or whatever method you are using is 100% efficient then by all means tell us what is the power that you could withdraw at that flow rate per day.

Do not pull a Nightmare and attempt to change the question to one of typos.


No machine is 100% efficient, Wake. There is no such thing a perpetual motion machine, Wake.

There is no magick cutoff for 'sufficient pressure'. If there is a pressure difference at all, the turbine will turn (assuming there is enough pressure to overcome friction and other loads).

Any household plumbing has sufficient pressure difference across a turbine, Wake (assuming the main valve is open!).

You keep going for these magick cutoff points, Wake. What is it with you and magick cutoff points?

You weren't making typos with your 'math'. It was just wrong, Wake, even though you claimed it was right, and insult people for trying to correct you.


This is all so simple as you say. So why haven't you shown us the power possible to get with a 3,000 gal/mth flow? I even gave you the formula so that you don't have to pretend that you can't find it.
05-02-2019 00:29
gfm7175
★☆☆☆☆
(105)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


You just said that you do mathematics in your work. Using a base of 3,000 gallons per month and assuming that the water pressure is sufficient that drawing power off of it doesn't diminish the flow that you are using and that the turbine or whatever method you are using is 100% efficient then by all means tell us what is the power that you could withdraw at that flow rate per day.

Do not pull a Nightmare and attempt to change the question to one of typos.


Yes, I make use of certain bits of mathematics on a regular basis in my line of work, and unit conversion calculations are certainly a part of that.

I'm not sure why you're talking about efficiency rating calculations when you don't even have correct calculations to base the efficiency rating calculations off of... Let's get the initial calculation correct before moving forward, Wake...
05-02-2019 00:29
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question. Instead you wish to change the subject to typos. When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?
05-02-2019 00:42
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question.

I did. I suggested other ways for him to produce the power for the purposes he wants.
Wake wrote:
Instead you wish to change the subject to typos.

No, Wake. YOU are changing the subject to typos. Inversion fallacy.
Wake wrote:
When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?

Insult fallacy.


The Parrot Killer
05-02-2019 00:43
gfm7175
★☆☆☆☆
(105)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question. Instead you wish to change the subject to typos. When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?


Just be a man and admit that you ****ed up your calculation, Wake... Everybody ****s up once in a while... I corrected another one of your math errors in another thread, and have seen other math errors from you. You do seem to be very illiterate in mathematics... Not like I am any math genius either, but I do have my areas of study, knowledge, and many years of experience when it comes to mathematics.
05-02-2019 01:05
Wake
★★★★★
(3805)
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question. Instead you wish to change the subject to typos. When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?


Just be a man and admit that you ****ed up your calculation, Wake... Everybody ****s up once in a while... I corrected another one of your math errors in another thread, and have seen other math errors from you. You do seem to be very illiterate in mathematics... Not like I am any math genius either, but I do have my areas of study, knowledge, and many years of experience when it comes to mathematics.
This was a rather simple question: as an average home uses about 3,000 gallons per month HOW much power can you draw off of that. Rather than tell me I'm screwed up show me that calculation that prove it or you're the one that's screwed up.
05-02-2019 02:04
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question. Instead you wish to change the subject to typos. When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?


Just be a man and admit that you ****ed up your calculation, Wake... Everybody ****s up once in a while... I corrected another one of your math errors in another thread, and have seen other math errors from you. You do seem to be very illiterate in mathematics... Not like I am any math genius either, but I do have my areas of study, knowledge, and many years of experience when it comes to mathematics.
This was a rather simple question: as an average home uses about 3,000 gallons per month HOW much power can you draw off of that. Rather than tell me I'm screwed up show me that calculation that prove it or you're the one that's screwed up.

Indeterminate. You still screwed up.


The Parrot Killer
05-02-2019 02:09
gfm7175
★☆☆☆☆
(105)
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Into the Night wrote:
gfm7175 wrote:
Wake wrote:
I consume about 3,000 gallons a month the year round. That is about 300 gallons a day. This water consumption is the morning shower and shave, toilets flushing a couple of times a day and washing the dished and filling the coffee pot for me and the tea pot for the missus.


Once again, your math "skills" fail you, Wake... According to your calculation, apparently you think there are only 10 days per month?? There are actually, 30.4375 days per month (365.25 days per year), Wake.

So, if you consume about 3,000 gallons of water per month, then you consume about 98.5626 gallons of water per day. (could just say 100 gallons/day for a nice simplistic number)


Nah. He said he consumes 300 gallons of water per day. That must be why California is so short of water. Wake is using it.


If he's instead correct about the 300 gallons of water per day, then he is consuming closer to 9,100 gallons of water per month... For the business that I work for, we have plenty of student housing (multiple students living in the same house [more than a typical sized family]) who don't even make use of that much water per month...

Like you say, Wake is certainly not helping the water shortage situation in California if he's using that much water...


It does seem a bit odd that neither you nor Nightmare with your supposed mathematical skills seem able to answer Harvey's question. Instead you wish to change the subject to typos. When do you expect to graduate from the 6th grade?


Just be a man and admit that you ****ed up your calculation, Wake... Everybody ****s up once in a while... I corrected another one of your math errors in another thread, and have seen other math errors from you. You do seem to be very illiterate in mathematics... Not like I am any math genius either, but I do have my areas of study, knowledge, and many years of experience when it comes to mathematics.
This was a rather simple question: as an average home uses about 3,000 gallons per month HOW much power can you draw off of that. Rather than tell me I'm screwed up show me that calculation that prove it or you're the one that's screwed up.

Not enough information to calculate... doesn't excuse you from your math error.
05-02-2019 02:39
HarveyH55
★★☆☆☆
(288)
Actually, I didn't give an numbers, that could be used to make any sort of energy calculations. I suppose if you knew physics pretty good, average water usage, flow rate (pipe pressure), one might be able to calculate how much work could be done. From that, you could calculate how much resistance to the water flow, a generator could put on the flow, without causing an unfavorable drop in water pressure. I did mention that it would be low voltage, enough current to charge a small power cell. Since, I was interest in only occasional use, would need to charge the batteries quickly, could be days or weeks, to reach a full charge.

Was just thinking of the moving water, has the potential to perform some side work, while we use the water as we normally do on a daily basis.
05-02-2019 02:46
Into the Night
★★★★★
(6585)
HarveyH55 wrote:
Actually, I didn't give an numbers, that could be used to make any sort of energy calculations. I suppose if you knew physics pretty good, average water usage, flow rate (pipe pressure), one might be able to calculate how much work could be done. From that, you could calculate how much resistance to the water flow, a generator could put on the flow, without causing an unfavorable drop in water pressure. I did mention that it would be low voltage, enough current to charge a small power cell. Since, I was interest in only occasional use, would need to charge the batteries quickly, could be days or weeks, to reach a full charge.

Was just thinking of the moving water, has the potential to perform some side work, while we use the water as we normally do on a daily basis.


It does, but it's really not a practical way. There are easier ways to charge batteries than using your water flow in your pipes.


The Parrot Killer
05-02-2019 20:11
Tim the plumber
★★★★☆
(1283)
The energy you would take out of the water flow was put in there by the water company when it pumped it to your house.




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